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View Poll Results: What city is the most comparable to Baltimore?
Philadelphia 60 39.74%
Wilmington (Delaware) 24 15.89%
Washington, D.C. 14 9.27%
Norfolk 6 3.97%
Richmond 12 7.95%
Pittsburgh 11 7.28%
Boston 3 1.99%
Other 21 13.91%
Voters: 151. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 02-05-2021, 08:17 AM
 
Location: Howard County, Maryland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by personone View Post
-There is no equivalent to University City in Baltimore. This area continues to develop and grow in Philly. The closest thing in Baltimore would be the area around University of Maryland at Baltimore, which isn't nearly as lively, developed, or provide the entertainment, dining, living options that UCity does.
Charles Village and Bolton Hill both bear a resemblance to University City (at least the residential parts of it), though it's obviously not an exact match.


Quote:
Originally Posted by rowhomecity View Post
I agree with all said above.

If anyone has actually lived in the two cities they would realize. Philadelphia and Baltimore are really not that alike.
I lived and worked in Philadelphia for 10 years. I've worked in downtown Baltimore for 27 years. And I believe that they are in fact fairly much alike.

Granted, Center City and downtown Baltimore are not much alike. Center City is more akin to Manhattan, on a very reduced scale. But the residential neighborhoods of Philadelphia have their counterparts in the residential neighborhoods of Baltimore. Both cities have a mix of rowhouses, duplexes, modest singles, and even large, grand houses. To me, Philadelphia's residential neighborhoods feel like Baltimore's, only there are more of them.

Some folks have mentioned Wilmington, which to me reminds me of a miniaturized Philadelphia. But since Philadelphia also reminds me of Baltimore, if A=B and B=C, then A=C. Thus, I'll grant the "once-removed" resemblance between Wilmington and Baltimore.
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Old 02-05-2021, 08:53 AM
 
Location: BMORE!
9,332 posts, read 7,752,708 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
Well, when the discussion is limited to East Coast cities, the parallels are stronger with Philadelphia than they are with any other single city, though the poster who said Baltimore is more a blend of Philly, Richmond and Norfolk is probably closer to hitting the mark.

But even though the built environments (especially the residential development) of the two cities differ dramatically, I think STLgasm has a point about Baltimore resembling St. Louis. The Southern influence is stronger in Maryland than it is in Missouri, but both states have it; it tends to be a bone of contention in Missouri (whether or not they like it, the residents of Missouri's other large city, which sees itself as more Western than Southern, live in a part of the state that was a hotbed of pro-Confederate activity in both the runup to the Civil War ["Bleeding Kansas"] and the war itself; that's why there are two Civil War battlefields in the Kansas City area and none in metro St. Louis) and less of one in Maryland, but even so, Baltimore in no way feels like a Southern city save maybe for a less-hectic pace than one finds just up I-95 in Philly. And even though Philadelphia and Baltimore both share the status of being heavily industrialized cities where the industry fled, St. Louis has that same status too, and as STLgasm noted, both Baltimore and St. Louis are politically isolated independent cities in border states. (If you doubt that Baltimore is politically isolated, given Maryland's general liberalism, I invite you to examine [Republican] Gov. Larry Hogan's track record on transportation investments in that state; they show a clear bias towards the Maryland suburbs of Washington, which voted for him by and large, and away from Baltimore City, which didn't. In a perhaps Freudian gaffe early in his first term, Gov. Hogan released a map showing how his administration had made "transportation investments for all of Maryland" that had a hole where Baltimore City should have been.)

Because of those parallels, I voted "Other." However: for those who draw a bright line between Pennsylvania and Maryland, let's not forget that said bright line is the Mason-Dixon Line. Philadelphia actually did a good bit of commerce with the South prior to the Civil War; Penn's medical school, for instance, trained most of the South's doctors. And there was also opposition to the abolitionist cause here, as the destruction of Pennsylvania Hall one week after it opened in 1855 demonstrates.
I'm fully aware of Hogan's neglect of the Baltimore area, and Baltimore City in particular. We've had spirited discussions on the matter.
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Old 02-05-2021, 09:23 AM
 
Location: Land of the Free
4,959 posts, read 4,795,919 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
Because of those parallels, I voted "Other." However: for those who draw a bright line between Pennsylvania and Maryland, let's not forget that said bright line is the Mason-Dixon Line. Philadelphia actually did a good bit of commerce with the South prior to the Civil War; Penn's medical school, for instance, trained most of the South's doctors. And there was also opposition to the abolitionist cause here, as the destruction of Pennsylvania Hall one week after it opened in 1855 demonstrates.
Philly was more abolitionist than New York. In 1800, Manhattan had nearly 3,000 slaves, all of Philadelphia County had fewer than 100. As late as 1820, Manhattan/Brooklyn/Staten Island had around 2,000 slaves, Philadelphia County had 7. The Quakers were way more abolitionist than the Dutch and NY did more business with the South due to being a major cotton hub, which Philly wasn't. Philly did much of its business with Delaware Valley farmers as a leading grain milling hub. The location closer to the Mason-Dixon line really didn't influence its history much in terms of being Southern.

Baltimore has a lot of parallels to Philly, Wilmington, and Richmond as a Fall Line city. But it was also the only city east of the Appalachains to become a major steel producing city with the Sparrows Point plant. This has made its decline even worse, and more along the lines of what's typical around the Great Lakes.

There are a lot of parallels to St. Louis, but Wash U Med School did a lot for more the city than Johns Hopkins has ever done for Baltimore with the Central West End redevelopment in the 70s. The Central West End-Forest Park-Delmar Loop section of St. Louis blows away anything in Baltimore today. Hopkins has sent a lot of money to DC and Montgomery County, Wash U didn't have a similar option, and also rejected a move to the suburbs during some of the worst times for post-industrial cities. The rowhouses around the CWE remind me more of the luxurious DC rowhouses than what you see in Baltimore.
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Old 02-05-2021, 09:48 AM
 
Location: BMORE!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by personone View Post
As someone from Maryland who has lived in Baltimore and Philly, the 2 cities are not very similar at all. The similarities are completely overblown on this site. There are some stretches (style) of row homes in certain parts of the city that do look similar, but that is about it.

Here is my take on their differences:
-Philadelphia's scale is MUCH bigger than Baltimore's, and it's palpable. When you are in the heart of downtown Philly, you get a canyon feeling, similar to NY and Chicago. That is not the case at all with Baltimore, a city that doesn't even have a single skyscraper that is 600ft or greater. Philly has a 1000 ft skyscraper and several 600+ buildings. The size/scale of the cities are very different.
-The downtowns feel completely different. Baltimore's is centered around the harbor, whereas Philly's is in Center City, which has a much more traditional downtown feel to it. The heart of Center City feels absolutely nothing like the heart of downtown Baltimore.
-Philly feels much more ethnic and international than Baltimore. Philly has a real Chinatown, and South Philly feels much more authentically Italian. The Italian population in Philly is infinitely larger than Baltimore's and its influence is felt throughout the city. Philly also has a sizable Puerto Rican and Vietnamese population (although neither of these populations felt very pervasive to me). But overall, Philly has much more of an old-school ethnic feel than Baltimore.
-There is no equivalent to University City in Baltimore. This area continues to develop and grow in Philly. The closest thing in Baltimore would be the area around University of Maryland at Baltimore, which isn't nearly as lively, developed, or provide the entertainment, dining, living options that UCity does.
-I have only been to Druid Hill park in Baltimore once, and it seemed ok, but nothing like the scale or scenery of Fairmount Park in Philly.
-There is a tiny subway in Baltimore (that many people don't even know about). There is nothing like the the SEPTA in Philly, with the old school rail lines/subway combos akin to what you find in NY, Boston, and Chicago.

Outside of the "look" of a few of the residential areas, Philly and Baltimore are not very similar. Even the predominant row homes in Baltimore look a lot different. They tend to be shorter, flat (no porch), and very colorful. Now there are different styles, but this is the predominant style in Baltimore. You don't really see this style in Philly. They tend to be taller with porches.
Baltimore doesn't need a Philly equivalent in whatever random comparison because they're nothing a like. That's like me saying what's Philly's equivalent to Beverly Hills, Santa Monica, Hollywood, Korea Town. Baltimore isnt required to be like Philly; they're technically not even in the same region of the country.
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Old 02-05-2021, 10:28 AM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
I've been to Wilmington several times. It looks like Philly. The demographics is far more similar to Philly, accents are that of Philly. The rowhouses look like Philly rowhouses.

I just don't see the Baltimore correlation
It's pretty clear actually.

Philly= Beyonce
Baltimore= Kelly
Wilmington= Michelle

They're all Destiny's Child.
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Old 02-05-2021, 10:36 AM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woxyroxme View Post
I would have to say Philadelphia based on what I have seen on CharlieBo313’s worst ghetto hoods of __________ youtube channel, narrow streets and row houses.
Of the big cities, it's Philly, but if you take a walk on a street in Wilmington, believe me you wouldn't know the difference of walking through East Baltimore, it's just much smaller. I agree with some that there are a few more distinctive differences as you compare Philly to Baltimore cause it's a lot more real "big city". But the neighborhoods in the two cities are enough to be considered sister cities, and some of their suburbs favor one another in certain areas.
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Old 02-05-2021, 10:42 AM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the resident09 View Post
Of the big cities, it's Philly, but if you take a walk on a street in Wilmington, believe me you wouldn't know the difference of walking through East Baltimore, it's just much smaller. I agree with some that there are a few more distinctive differences as you compare Philly to Baltimore cause it's a lot more real "big city". But the neighborhoods in the two cities are enough to be considered sister cities, and some of their suburbs favor one another in certain areas.
I don't see it. The "feel" of the 2 cities is too different. I don't see Baltimore as a smaller version of Philly. The downtowns, people, scale, look and feel are just too different. Even the rowhome styles are very different.
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Old 02-05-2021, 10:43 AM
 
Location: Houston, TX
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Baltimore reminds me of a cross between Philly and Wilmington in a weird way.
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Old 02-05-2021, 10:46 AM
 
Location: BMORE!
9,332 posts, read 7,752,708 times
Reputation: 4833
Quote:
Originally Posted by the resident09 View Post
It's pretty clear actually.

Philly= Beyonce
Baltimore= Kelly
Wilmington= Michelle

They're all Destiny's Child.
Lol!! That was pretty good.
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Old 02-05-2021, 10:48 AM
 
Location: BMORE!
9,332 posts, read 7,752,708 times
Reputation: 4833
Quote:
Originally Posted by personone View Post
I don't see it. The "feel" of the 2 cities is too different. I don't see Baltimore as a smaller version of Philly. The downtowns, people, scale, look and feel are just too different. Even the rowhome styles are very different.
The rowhouses are very different, but in response to your earlier post, Baltimore has a ton of 3 story rowhouses. They are by no means an anomaly in Baltimore.
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