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View Poll Results: What city is the most comparable to Baltimore?
Philadelphia 44 40.00%
Wilmington (Delaware) 15 13.64%
Washington, D.C. 8 7.27%
Norfolk 6 5.45%
Richmond 10 9.09%
Pittsburgh 11 10.00%
Boston 2 1.82%
Other 14 12.73%
Voters: 110. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 02-05-2021, 06:40 PM
 
Location: The High Desert
10,399 posts, read 5,593,953 times
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St. Louis.
Both old. Both independent cities. Both port cities - river/bay. Both with some southern roots. Both in "border slave states". Both with high diversity. Both with ethnic neighborhoods. Both with similar old architecture. Both with a lot of history. St. Louis Browns became the Baltimore Orioles.
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Old 02-05-2021, 06:50 PM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
5,858 posts, read 4,557,151 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheProf View Post
NOTE: I've lived in both, too (and am currently living in one of them: Philly)

Both are old Colonial big cities that were very significant in America's founding.

They share the same general region; only 90 miles separating them.

Architecturally, some neighborhoods are nearly indistinguishable -- rowhouses in Baltimore are as similar to those in Philly as anywhere else; both in working-class neighborhoods and upscale ones, too (ie Fitler Square/Rittenhouse West = Mount Vernon)

Both are old port, historic shipping, longshoremen towns.

Both have tons of cobblestone streets (Hello: Fell's Point!) which I HATE driving on; (I'm not wild about walking them, either).

Both founded/were homes to the oldest, largest, and most historical American railroads: the Pennsylvania Railroad vs. the Baltimore & Ohio, respectively. (btw both are among the few (still) heavily passenger RR-travel dependent cities that are located on Amtrak's Northeast Corridor -- the historic, and only high-speed intercity rail line in the nation... which is a great thing).

Both have a similar-type, working-class (mostly white) neighborhood culture (with their own distinct accents); ie Highlandtown = NE Philly and much of Roxborough.

... as for those 'city accents', both are diphthong-y which gives both cities a sort of country-town-within-a-big-city air.

... thus, both have strong-distinctive, marble-stoop, brick front yard rowhouse cultures.

That said, both similarly have experienced lots of gentrification in these rowhouse/formerly working-class nabes: Fishtown = Canton, Brewerytown = Hampden, etc...


Following the last, both have their own unique, insular natures.


Both have insecurity issues with their nearby neighbors -- Philly-to-NYC, Balto-to-DC.

... this list is not exhaustive.
These guys are going to defend Baltimore's "uniqueness" and independence of a relationship to anywhere else outside of 695 til the casket drops. It's no point of explaining this much honestly.

Of the cities being compared above Baltimore is most similar to Wilimingtom and Philadelphia, it's not hard to see, feel, or understand to any outsider. No one is saying these cities aren't independent of one another with differences. All major cities have differences by comparison. The big brother little brother comparison fits pretty well regarding Philly-Baltimore.

FWIW Baltimore and DC do have similarities too, that's been foregone here by the assumption the cities have nothing in common, which is also false. If you've lived in or around the cities/region and know the history, it exists. But overall Wilmington/Philly come closest.
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Old 02-05-2021, 07:38 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
5,758 posts, read 2,751,188 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the resident09 View Post
These guys are going to defend Baltimore's "uniqueness" and independence of a relationship to anywhere else outside of 695 til the casket drops. It's no point of explaining this much honestly.

Of the cities being compared above Baltimore is most similar to Wilimingtom and Philadelphia, it's not hard to see, feel, or understand to any outsider. No one is saying these cities aren't independent of one another with differences. All major cities have differences by comparison. The big brother little brother comparison fits pretty well regarding Philly-Baltimore.

FWIW Baltimore and DC do have similarities too, that's been foregone here by the assumption the cities have nothing in common, which is also false. If you've lived in or around the cities/region and know the history, it exists. But overall Wilmington/Philly come closest.
DC is waaaay more similar to Baltimore than Philly is. Heck it’s only 30 mins from Bmore and they are in the same region.
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Old 02-05-2021, 07:53 PM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
5,174 posts, read 8,273,381 times
Reputation: 5331
Quote:
Originally Posted by the resident09 View Post
These guys are going to defend Baltimore's "uniqueness" and independence of a relationship to anywhere else outside of 695 til the casket drops. It's no point of explaining this much honestly.

Of the cities being compared above Baltimore is most similar to Wilimingtom and Philadelphia, it's not hard to see, feel, or understand to any outsider. No one is saying these cities aren't independent of one another with differences. All major cities have differences by comparison. The big brother little brother comparison fits pretty well regarding Philly-Baltimore.

FWIW Baltimore and DC do have similarities too, that's been foregone here by the assumption the cities have nothing in common, which is also false. If you've lived in or around the cities/region and know the history, it exists. But overall Wilmington/Philly come closest.
As a Philly area native, I agree. There's a distinct "Mid-Atlantic feel" that stretches from the DC area to the NYC area, in my experience. In fact, having now lived in another district Northeast subregion (New England), I feel the Mid-Atlantic vibe more strongly than ever when visiting.

And while no two cities are obviously carbon copies, there are definitely common overtones in those that are in proximity to one another.
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Old 02-05-2021, 08:21 PM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
8,301 posts, read 4,063,325 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
They are not similar. You don't see people from Philly or Baltimore saying that they are. Better yet, why would Baltimore want to be similar to Philly in the first place. You in particular, play up the notion that people think that the cities are similar that it fits into your own narrative that Baltimore thinks that it's a Northeastern city. Baltimore is not a Northeastern city, nor is it trying to be. Hell, Baltimore isn't even a mid-atlantic city. It is an old school, urban southern city.
Only one other Southern city had any real industrial base to speak of: Birmingham, which was not founded until after the Civil War.

All the others were one of the following: port cities, tobacco-trading centers, market towns.

Even if it has elements of Richmond and Norfolk with it, Baltimore doesn't have the "antebellum charm" or languid pace of most of the Southern cities I know about. (Atlanta is probably an exception on the languid-pace part, which might be fitting for a city that pretty much willed itself into existence because a bunch of railroads ended there.)

I can't think of a highway through any Southern city save Birmingham that looks like I-95 through Baltimore. The closest parallels to that highway I can think of in other cities are I-95 through Philadelphia's River Wards and the Chicago Skyway. Parts of Interstates 70 and 55 in St. Louis ditto.

Baltimore may be in the South, but it's not a Southern city IMO. And Maryland's claim to Southernness is not as strong as the states below the Potomac's are. Remember, Maryland didn't secede, even though some of the firecest battles of the Civil War were fought there. (They were fought there for the same reason the battles of Lexington and Westport in Missouri were fought: the Confederates hoped both would succumb to secession with enough pressure.)
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Old 02-05-2021, 08:31 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
5,758 posts, read 2,751,188 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SunGrins View Post
St. Louis.
Both old. Both independent cities. Both port cities - river/bay. Both with some southern roots. Both in "border slave states". Both with high diversity. Both with ethnic neighborhoods. Both with similar old architecture. Both with a lot of history. St. Louis Browns became the Baltimore Orioles.
This is the correct answer.
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Old 02-05-2021, 09:08 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by personone View Post
DC is waaaay more similar to Baltimore than Philly is. Heck it’s only 30 mins from Bmore and they are in the same region.
DC and Baltimore aren't al that similar either.
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Old 02-05-2021, 09:33 PM
 
Location: Northern California
2,125 posts, read 1,112,435 times
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Any more claims that Baltimore is a southern city ought to be posted in the forum where they belong - Paranormal.
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Old 02-05-2021, 09:34 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
8,745 posts, read 7,232,869 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
Only one other Southern city had any real industrial base to speak of: Birmingham, which was not founded until after the Civil War.

All the others were one of the following: port cities, tobacco-trading centers, market towns.

Even if it has elements of Richmond and Norfolk with it, Baltimore doesn't have the "antebellum charm" or languid pace of most of the Southern cities I know about. (Atlanta is probably an exception on the languid-pace part, which might be fitting for a city that pretty much willed itself into existence because a bunch of railroads ended there.)

I can't think of a highway through any Southern city save Birmingham that looks like I-95 through Baltimore. The closest parallels to that highway I can think of in other cities are I-95 through Philadelphia's River Wards and the Chicago Skyway. Parts of Interstates 70 and 55 in St. Louis ditto.

Baltimore may be in the South, but it's not a Southern city IMO. And Maryland's claim to Southernness is not as strong as the states below the Potomac's are. Remember, Maryland didn't secede, even though some of the firecest battles of the Civil War were fought there. (They were fought there for the same reason the battles of Lexington and Westport in Missouri were fought: the Confederates hoped both would succumb to secession with enough pressure.)
Great Post. However, we have to stop saying that a city is not southern because it doesn't look, doesn't function like the stereotypical southern city. I don't think NYC are particularly similar, but one isn't any more or less part of that region than the other. It's narrow-minded, and insulting to the south. Me and Personone agree that Baltimore is a southern city, and not similar to Philly for two completely different reasons. At the end of the day, I'd say Baltimore was most similar to Norfolk. Two old southern port cities, similar demographics, similar chesapeake Bay culture/tidewater influence.
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Old 02-05-2021, 09:45 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
8,745 posts, read 7,232,869 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by personone View Post
I completely agree. I can buy St. Louis as a very comparable city.
Time out! Coming from a logical standpoint, you think that St. Louis, a city that is 730 miles away from Baltimore is very comparable, while a city that is 90 miles away has absolutely nothing in common?

People may start tuning you out if your blatant Northeast bias keeps seeping through your posts, Baltimore area native.
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