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View Poll Results: What city is the most comparable to Baltimore?
Philadelphia 44 40.00%
Wilmington (Delaware) 15 13.64%
Washington, D.C. 8 7.27%
Norfolk 6 5.45%
Richmond 10 9.09%
Pittsburgh 11 10.00%
Boston 2 1.82%
Other 14 12.73%
Voters: 110. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 02-05-2021, 10:02 PM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
5,858 posts, read 4,557,151 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NW4me View Post
Any more claims that Baltimore is a southern city ought to be posted in the forum where they belong - Paranormal.
In my lifetime, I'd never heard any notion of Southernness and Baltimore in the same sentence, until logging on C-D. Admiteddly I'd heard it about DC by a few, but in real life about Baltimore never.
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Old 02-05-2021, 10:57 PM
 
3,640 posts, read 3,559,487 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the resident09 View Post
In my lifetime, I'd never heard any notion of Southernness and Baltimore in the same sentence, until logging on C-D. Admiteddly I'd heard it about DC by a few, but in real life about Baltimore never.
Baltimore actually had a Robert E. Lee Park within its borders, all the way until 2015; just 6 years ago. However, following the infamous Charleston church massacre by a confederate flag-waving white supremacist, public pressure mounted to drop the name ... and it is now simply Lake Rowland Park. Not surprising. Maryland, though not officially a CSA state during the Civil War, was still a hotbed of Southern sympathizers, especially in Baltimore; John Wilkes Booth was among them.
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Old 02-05-2021, 11:13 PM
 
74 posts, read 25,224 times
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Of these it’s probably Wilmington, which is like a mini-mix between Philly and Baltimore. But I went with other—St. Louis. They feel very similar in terms of size, economics, crime/urban blight issues, collections of some very nice remaining neighborhoods, and both have a prestigious but sometimes overlooked university, WashU and JHU.
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Old 02-06-2021, 01:13 AM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
8,301 posts, read 4,063,325 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the resident09 View Post
In my lifetime, I'd never heard any notion of Southernness and Baltimore in the same sentence, until logging on C-D. Admiteddly I'd heard it about DC by a few, but in real life about Baltimore never.
Actually, IMO, the best-known quip about Washington wrt Southernness was John F. Kennedy's observation that the national capital "combined Southern efficiency with Northern charm."

Baltimore comes awfully close to meeting that standard.
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Old 02-06-2021, 01:40 AM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
5,758 posts, read 2,751,188 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
Time out! Coming from a logical standpoint, you think that St. Louis, a city that is 730 miles away from Baltimore is very comparable, while a city that is 90 miles away has absolutely nothing in common?

People may start tuning you out if your blatant Northeast bias keeps seeping through your posts, Baltimore area native.
It's mainly a size-scale thing. Both are mid-sized cities. Both have industrial backbones. Both have very large and prominent African American populations and also historic Jewish populations and influence. Both have a light rail system. Wash U and Hopkins are somewhat comparable (although Wash U is in a nice part of the city). They are very comparable despite being in different regions.

Philly is so much larger and more grand (in terms of its size and scale) that it's not very comparable to Baltimore. I don't think that Baltimore and Philly have nothing in common, but outside the rowhomes, which even look different, I just don't see much similarities. In Baltimore, the predominant rowhome style is short, flat (with no porch), and colorful. In Philly, it's taller, has a porch, and is not super colorful.

It's really because of the size/scale that I find St. Louis more comparable.
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Old 02-06-2021, 02:08 AM
 
Location: BMORE!
8,745 posts, read 7,232,869 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by personone View Post
It's mainly a size-scale thing. Both are mid-sized cities. Both have industrial backbones. Both have very large and prominent African American populations and also historic Jewish populations and influence. Both have a light rail system. Wash U and Hopkins are somewhat comparable (although Wash U is in a nice part of the city). They are very comparable despite being in different regions.

Philly is so much larger and more grand (in terms of its size and scale) that it's not very comparable to Baltimore. I don't think that Baltimore and Philly have nothing in common, but outside the rowhomes, which even look different, I just don't see much similarities. In Baltimore, the predominant rowhome style is short, flat (with no porch), and colorful. In Philly, it's taller, has a porch, and is not super colorful.

It's really because of the size/scale that I find St. Louis more comparable.
Continuing with your logic, do you find more similarities between Philly and NYC? The scale of those two cities are even greater than Baltimore and Philly. Also, JHU is located in a nice neighborhood, however, it is only a few blocks away from the hood on its southeastern edge. It's northern fringes are bordered by nicer neighborhoods. Examples: Dropped pin
https://maps.app.goo.gl/izin7jcrmR8zSsRR6

This street is a block away from JHU; the campus is at the end of the block.

Baltimore has tall rowhouses as well and in variety of styles. That assertion is, in essence, false. 3-4 story rowhouses are not uncommon here.
https://maps.app.goo.gl/xxJpvPwRKNzY4Kpt9

Baltimore is the only other predominantly rowhouse city in the country, so of course it's gonna have 3 story rowhouses.
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Old 02-06-2021, 04:08 AM
 
1,075 posts, read 291,013 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
Continuing with your logic, do you find more similarities between Philly and NYC? The scale of those two cities are even greater than Baltimore and Philly. Also, JHU is located in a nice neighborhood, however, it is only a few blocks away from the hood on its southeastern edge. It's northern fringes are bordered by nicer neighborhoods. Examples: Dropped pin
https://maps.app.goo.gl/izin7jcrmR8zSsRR6

This street is a block away from JHU; the campus is at the end of the block.

Baltimore has tall rowhouses as well and in variety of styles. That assertion is, in essence, false. 3-4 story rowhouses are not uncommon here.
https://maps.app.goo.gl/xxJpvPwRKNzY4Kpt9

Baltimore is the only other predominantly rowhouse city in the country, so of course it's gonna have 3 story rowhouses.
Exactly, by stats alone tell us this. Philly has links say 60% and some 70% as rowhomes and that does not include the twins/duplex half-doubles which are not considered rows. Baltimore also is up there at least 60%.

Only if I had to pick a Midwestern city most like a East Coast city and especially a Philly/Baltimore would I pick St Louis.

From what I have seen and perceived. Baltimore does not have the very narrow alley-sized streets as so many of those sub-divided blocks common in Philly back-in-a-day were split and alleys eliminated. Baltimore seems to have far more alleys intact with backyards.

But in styles of rows ..... just way more similar and alike even then not.

Gentrified block in Baltimore of the taller rows that yes..... Philly has too. 4-floor ones were probably more high-end when built too. ALL JUST RANDOM STREETVIEWS I CLICKED ON.....

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.3076...7i16384!8i8192

Its alleyway
https://www.google.com/maps/@39.3076...7i16384!8i8192


https://www.google.com/maps/@39.3078...7i16384!8i8192

Its Alleyway
https://www.google.com/maps/@39.3077...7i16384!8i8192


https://www.google.com/maps/@39.3082...7i16384!8i8192

Its alleyway
https://www.google.com/maps/@39.3080...7i16384!8i8192


Other tall rows...
https://www.google.com/maps/@39.3022...7i16384!8i8192

Its alley is still there .... just all around it are new rows/townhouses and streetview does not go down the actual alley here. Still I zoomed in on it

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.3010...7i16384!8i8192

Other nice rows that were saved and with Victorian Gilded-Age features

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.3163...7i16384!8i8192

You also have the Green porchy rows

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.3171...7i16384!8i8192

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.3159...7i16384!8i8192

There are alleys also all over Baltimore like Chicago (though not a rowhome city in any sense as Philly/Baltimore. Chicago has the most alleys as the much larger city of course and 90% of the city is. But just as Chicago .... Streetview goes down Baltimore Alleys also...

Really, I do not know why someone says Philly has more Porch rows?? Both have them depending on the era/decade they were built. Just by far and I mean by far.... Philly has those super-narrow streets with rows. Alley-sized and due to their era streets were sub-divided further to get more mass-built rows in and alleys totally eliminated. Seem Baltimore has FAR MORE ALLEYS intact like Chicago behind its row blocks also.

Size of the city has little to do with its majority of blocks and how they compare with another city. St Louis again may be the most Eastern looking Midwest city. But still not the scale or % of the city is rows..... as both Philly and Baltimore.....
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Old 02-06-2021, 05:49 AM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
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NoHyping: The alleys in Philadelphia were not "eliminated"; they simply weren't built to begin with. In those parts of the city built before the First World War, what took their place were the interstitial "little streets," the older of which are even narrower than the alleys you find in other cities. On many blocks, you will find pedestrian paths — with lights, even — separating the backyards of the houses on the main and the interstitial streets.

As the automobile rose in popularity, builders altered rowhouse designs here to add one-car garages in their basements. As these were located at the back of the house, what would have been a backyard in times past became a driveway accessed from an alley; together, the alleys and driveways formed a single expanse of concrete stretching from the backs of the houses on one street to the backs of the houses on the next. From about the 1960s onward, some owners would attach decks to the backs of their houses' main floors in order to create some (more) private outdoor space; in some neighborhoods, you will find that some rowhouses have backyard trappings like patios and grills in their front yards.
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Old 02-06-2021, 08:24 AM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
5,758 posts, read 2,751,188 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the resident09 View Post
In my lifetime, I'd never heard any notion of Southernness and Baltimore in the same sentence, until logging on C-D. Admiteddly I'd heard it about DC by a few, but in real life about Baltimore never.
Baltimore (and Maryland and DC) are "officially" classified as Southern by the US CENSUS. That same Census we use to provide definitive facts and statistics to back up our claims on this site (and for official federal reporting purposes).

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southern_United_States

I grew up in Maryland (born in the 80's) and earlier in life and even in school heard Southerness and Baltimore in the same sentence. Not so much anymore. It's usually not mentioned with northern or southern nowadays.

But how many times have you heard Southerness and Miami, Southerness and Tampa, or Southerness and Raleigh-Durham (in modern Research Triangle times) in the same sentence? That's a bad barometer for whether or not a city is officially classified as Southern or not. Outside of the really Deep South, many of the characteristics of "The South" have died out. I was in Chapel Hill about a year ago and didn't hear one southern accent (slight exaggeration, but you get my point).
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Old 02-06-2021, 08:27 AM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
5,758 posts, read 2,751,188 times
Reputation: 6513
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
Actually, IMO, the best-known quip about Washington wrt Southernness was John F. Kennedy's observation that the national capital "combined Southern efficiency with Northern charm."

Baltimore comes awfully close to meeting that standard.
Yeah. I've always thought that quote applies nicely to Baltimore and DC!
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