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View Poll Results: I would rather live in the...
Rust Belt 182 44.61%
Sun Belt 226 55.39%
Voters: 408. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 09-21-2009, 10:34 PM
 
1,512 posts, read 8,133,490 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by loillon892 View Post
It seems that there is a lot of discussion here about regional preferences, but I couldn't find this poll. Not "North vs. South", but more specifically, Rust Belt (i.e. Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, Pennsylvania) versus Sun Belt (i.e., California, Arizona, Nevada, Florida.) Some "northern" states aren't in the Rust Belt (i.e., Vermont) just as some Southern states (i.e., Kentucky or West Virginia) aren't in the Sun Belt.

Which of those two broad regions do you prefer, and why?

Having lived in both...my vote is with the Sun Belt. Rust Belt cities and states had absolutely no appeal to me at all, and I was never happy living in that region.
The Rust Belt, baby!
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Old 04-03-2010, 09:36 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX/Chicago, IL/Houston, TX/Washington, DC
10,138 posts, read 15,918,331 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Summers View Post
I'd take the Sunbelt easily: Pittsburgh, Buffalo, Syracuse, Milwaukee, Detroit, Toledo, Cleveland, etc against ATL, Miami, LA, New Orleans, Houston, San Diego...Keep going?OK, vs Dallas, Las Vegas, Phoenix, Tampa, Orlando,OKC, and San Antonio. I can live in Pittsburgh and Milwaukee easily, but forget the rest of the rustbelt towns. The Sunbelt has more to offer.
A fair match up would be:

1. NYC, Chicago, Philadelphia, Boston, DC, Baltimore, Milwaukee, Indianapolis, Buffalo, Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati, Detroit, Minneapolis, St. Louis, Louisville, St. Paul, Rochester, Grand Rapids, Kansas City, Raleigh, Charlotte, Omaha.

VERSUS

2. LA, Houston, Dallas, San Deigo, San Antonio, San Jose, San Francisco, Phoenix, Denver, Austin, Jacksonville, Miami, Tampa, Orlando, Tucson, Fort Worth, Las Vegas, Atlanta, New Orleans, Salt Lake City, El Paso, Fort Lauderdale, Nashville, Memphis, Knoxville, Sacramento, Oklahoma City, Tulsa, Albuquerque, Mobile.

That should be a good group match up.

I don't know where to put Portland, and Seattle though...
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Old 04-03-2010, 09:40 AM
 
6,041 posts, read 11,428,361 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OmShahi View Post
A fair match up would be:

1. NYC, Chicago, Philadelphia, Boston, DC, Baltimore, Milwaukee, Indianapolis, Buffalo, Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati, Detroit, Minneapolis, St. Louis, Louisville, St. Paul, Rochester, Grand Rapids, Kansas City, Raleigh, Charlotte, Omaha.

VERSUS

2. LA, Houston, Dallas, San Deigo, San Antonio, San Jose, San Francisco, Phoenix, Denver, Austin, Jacksonville, Miami, Tampa, Orlando, Tucson, Fort Worth, Las Vegas, Atlanta, New Orleans, Salt Lake City, El Paso, Fort Lauderdale, Nashville, Memphis, Knoxville, Sacramento, Oklahoma City, Tulsa, Albuquerque, Mobile.

That should be a good group match up.

I don't know where to put Portland, and Seattle though...
Why do you put Raleigh and Charlotte in the first group? They belong with the Sunbelt cities, especially since you included Nashville and Knoxville as Sunbelt.
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Old 04-03-2010, 09:45 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX/Chicago, IL/Houston, TX/Washington, DC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by city_data91 View Post
Why do you put Raleigh and Charlotte in the first group? They belong with the Sunbelt cities, especially since you included Nashville and Knoxville as Sunbelt.
Haha, I'm sorry about that, I was just referring to their geographical location and vicinity to Virginia/DC area so I might have classified them incorrectly.
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Old 04-03-2010, 02:01 PM
 
Location: Northridge, Los Angeles, CA
2,684 posts, read 7,346,355 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OmShahi View Post
A fair match up would be:

1. NYC, Chicago, Philadelphia, Boston, DC, Baltimore, Milwaukee, Indianapolis, Buffalo, Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati, Detroit, Minneapolis, St. Louis, Louisville, St. Paul, Rochester, Grand Rapids, Kansas City, Raleigh, Charlotte, Omaha.

VERSUS

2. LA, Houston, Dallas, San Deigo, San Antonio, San Jose, San Francisco, Phoenix, Denver, Austin, Jacksonville, Miami, Tampa, Orlando, Tucson, Fort Worth, Las Vegas, Atlanta, New Orleans, Salt Lake City, El Paso, Fort Lauderdale, Nashville, Memphis, Knoxville, Sacramento, Oklahoma City, Tulsa, Albuquerque, Mobile.

That should be a good group match up.

I don't know where to put Portland, and Seattle though...
It's difficult to define the 'Sunbelt' the further north you go. For example, San Francisco is located at 37'46 N while Washington DC is located at 38'53 N. In other words, if SF was on the East Coast, it would only be 60-70 miles away from DC! By all intents purposes, they are both located in the same latitudinal range, but they are typically classified differently (SF in the Sunbelt, DC typically part of the NE).

Portland and Seattle aren't Sunbelt cities, but they aren't Rust Belt either. They're a weird mix of growing areas with mild weather (temperature range is somewhat constant).

I personally consider SF and the rest of the Bay Area the sunbelt, since most areas get more than 65% sunny days/year, but most people would consider the sunbelt between 25-35'N (roughly corresponding to South Florida and South Texas northward to the border of SC/NC, border of TN and GA/MS/AL, MO/AR border, straight line northern border of OK/NM/AZ, northern border of Clark County, NV and straight line northern border of San Bernardino/Kern/SLO Counties in CA), with 35-36 N (roughly states of NC and TN) to be transition zones.

It's really hard to define it. We should have a poll on what the sunbelt is.
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Old 04-03-2010, 09:22 PM
 
4,692 posts, read 9,251,378 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lifeshadower View Post
It's difficult to define the 'Sunbelt' the further north you go. For example, San Francisco is located at 37'46 N while Washington DC is located at 38'53 N. In other words, if SF was on the East Coast, it would only be 60-70 miles away from DC! By all intents purposes, they are both located in the same latitudinal range, but they are typically classified differently (SF in the Sunbelt, DC typically part of the NE).

Portland and Seattle aren't Sunbelt cities, but they aren't Rust Belt either. They're a weird mix of growing areas with mild weather (temperature range is somewhat constant).

I personally consider SF and the rest of the Bay Area the sunbelt, since most areas get more than 65% sunny days/year, but most people would consider the sunbelt between 25-35'N (roughly corresponding to South Florida and South Texas northward to the border of SC/NC, border of TN and GA/MS/AL, MO/AR border, straight line northern border of OK/NM/AZ, northern border of Clark County, NV and straight line northern border of San Bernardino/Kern/SLO Counties in CA), with 35-36 N (roughly states of NC and TN) to be transition zones.

It's really hard to define it. We should have a poll on what the sunbelt is.
Yea, based on your definition I don't consider cities in NC to be sunbelt but most of the cities in SC to be apart of it. I think wikipedia has a map.
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Old 04-03-2010, 10:26 PM
 
Location: Greeley, Colorado
631 posts, read 1,568,978 times
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Sunbelt all the way.

1-My kind of weather

2-I've found people from the Sunbelt to be more friendly and open

3-That 99.9999999999999999% humidity is something I'd love to have every single day, but here in Colorado I'm lucky to get 40%.
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Old 04-04-2010, 02:54 AM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,180 posts, read 14,767,368 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adavi215 View Post
Yea, based on your definition I don't consider cities in NC to be sunbelt but most of the cities in SC to be apart of it. I think wikipedia has a map.


It's funny that the map excludes some states that the actual article goes on to include in the Sunbelt: "The Sun Belt comprises the southern tier of the United States and is usually considered to include at least the states of Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, roughly half of California, southern Nevada, and southern Virginia; more expansively, Colorado and Utah (and all of California and Nevada) are sometimes considered as Sun Belt states."
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Old 04-04-2010, 05:34 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX/Chicago, IL/Houston, TX/Washington, DC
10,138 posts, read 15,918,331 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Akhenaton06 View Post

It's funny that the map excludes some states that the actual article goes on to include in the Sunbelt: "The Sun Belt comprises the southern tier of the United States and is usually considered to include at least the states of Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, roughly half of California, southern Nevada, and southern Virginia; more expansively, Colorado and Utah (and all of California and Nevada) are sometimes considered as Sun Belt states."
Raleigh seems to be at level, it can go either way from what I can see on this map.
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Old 04-04-2010, 01:11 PM
 
Location: roaming gnome
12,385 posts, read 28,359,391 times
Reputation: 5877
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lifeshadower View Post
It's difficult to define the 'Sunbelt' the further north you go. For example, San Francisco is located at 37'46 N while Washington DC is located at 38'53 N. In other words, if SF was on the East Coast, it would only be 60-70 miles away from DC! By all intents purposes, they are both located in the same latitudinal range, but they are typically classified differently (SF in the Sunbelt, DC typically part of the NE).

Portland and Seattle aren't Sunbelt cities, but they aren't Rust Belt either. They're a weird mix of growing areas with mild weather (temperature range is somewhat constant).

I personally consider SF and the rest of the Bay Area the sunbelt, since most areas get more than 65% sunny days/year, but most people would consider the sunbelt between 25-35'N (roughly corresponding to South Florida and South Texas northward to the border of SC/NC, border of TN and GA/MS/AL, MO/AR border, straight line northern border of OK/NM/AZ, northern border of Clark County, NV and straight line northern border of San Bernardino/Kern/SLO Counties in CA), with 35-36 N (roughly states of NC and TN) to be transition zones.

It's really hard to define it. We should have a poll on what the sunbelt is.
sf the city isn't really that sunny and certainly not warm, temps rarely get past 75, less than 30 days a year on average.. you always need a jacket at night. the winters are cold and damp with regular river flooding in the suburbs, lots of stringed together days of gray. nothing like southern california/az/texas/florida where the bulk of "sun belters" claim home. it does get pretty hot inland in napa/inland east bay and san jose though. probably why it is not on that dividing map above. it is also very urban more in tune to cities in the north, not so much like other sun belt cities.

Last edited by grapico; 04-04-2010 at 01:19 PM..
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