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Old 09-30-2009, 02:22 PM
 
Location: ITP
2,138 posts, read 6,295,787 times
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I gotta clarify this as a native born Midwesterner: THERE IS NOTHING ABOUT DALLAS THAT'S MIDWEST!!!
  • It has a different climate than the Midwest
  • It doesn't have the same patterns of urban development, or even ethnic enclaves, that you would find in cities in the Midwest
  • It's more conservative politically and culturally than the Midwest
  • It has a different religious fabric than the Midwest
  • It has a different history than the Midwest
  • It doesn't have the same foliage as the Midwest (live oaks don't grow in the Midwest)

Dallas is more Southern than Midwestern--with a heavy Western influence. There is nothing Midwest about a town when one of the largest parks is named after Robert E Lee, one of the largest high schools is named after Stonewall Jackson, a major sporting event is named the Cotton Bowl, and most of the suburbs were built on former cotton fields.

Also--and no offense to anyone here--Oklahoma and Arkansas are not the Midwest!!!
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Old 09-30-2009, 02:24 PM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,982 posts, read 35,028,608 times
Reputation: 7427
Quote:
Originally Posted by south-to-west View Post
I gotta clarify this as a native born Midwesterner: THERE IS NOTHING ABOUT DALLAS THAT'S MIDWEST!!!
  • It has a different climate than the Midwest
  • It doesn't have the same patterns of urban development, or even ethnic enclaves, that you would find in cities in the Midwest
  • It's more conservative politically and culturally than the Midwest
  • It has a different religious fabric than the Midwest
  • It has a different history than the Midwest
  • It doesn't have the same foliage as the Midwest (live oaks don't grow in the Midwest)

Dallas is more Southern than Midwestern--with a heavy Western influence. There is nothing Midwest about a town when one of the largest parks is named after Robert E Lee, one of the largest high schools is named after Stonewall Jackson, a major sporting event is named the Cotton Bowl, and most of the suburbs were built on former cotton fields.
Well this depends on if you consider Oklahoma and Arkansas southern or not. You disqualifying those two is going to open up a huge debate about what's southern and what's not.
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Old 09-30-2009, 02:24 PM
 
14,256 posts, read 26,789,930 times
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Originally Posted by grindin View Post
Not disagreeing with you on that. I was just referring to the D/FW area in that instance.

When I was a child, we would drive every summer from Cali to Mississippi , but we didn't feel like we were down in the south until we hit the D/FW area. That was the first city we'd hit where there were R&B radio stations way back when, and the DJ's had obviously southern accents. When we'd drive east on I-20 and start seeing the scenery change from plains and farmland to southern forest somewhere in Van Zandt County (or wherever east of Dallas), my mom and dad would get really happy and think, "we're home!" even though we still had another 5 or 6 hrs to drive.
Exactly, when you start seeing those TALL pines trees that's when you have the feeling you're in the South. That's why I never call places like Austin, San Antonio, and other cities along the I35 Corridor Southern. They are hardly Southern.
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Old 09-30-2009, 02:28 PM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,982 posts, read 35,028,608 times
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Originally Posted by polo89 View Post
Exactly, when you start seeing those TALL pines trees that's when you have the feeling you're in the South. That's why I never call places like Austin, San Antonio, and other cities along the I35 Corridor Southern. They are hardly Southern.
Waco, Hearne, Marlin,Southern Dallas, Calvert, and more. Hearne and Calvert can feel almost or just as southern as cities in east Texas. Anyone who knows about Waco's past and have experienced the city will tell you it's definitely southern compared to western.
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Old 09-30-2009, 02:30 PM
 
4,775 posts, read 8,787,009 times
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Anybody been to Vickburg Mississppi. Its characteristics are very similar to Dallas.

Raymond, Mississppi "The Battle of Raymond" site from the civil war....


http://theminiaturespage.com/profiles/?id=894321
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Old 09-30-2009, 02:30 PM
 
14,256 posts, read 26,789,930 times
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Originally Posted by kdogg817 View Post
Basically what your doing is ignoring DFW southern roots and the towns in between. The South begins East of I 35 not I 45. You have to live here and experience it to really get a feel of the southern roots. Those big Mega Churches, gospel singers, and the soulful atmosphere of Dallas can't be ignored. Brown and Cora natives of the area from Tyler Perry plays attend church in Fort Worth, Texas. Gospel Artist Kirk Franklin is from Fort Worth, Texas you better believe we have strong proud southern tradition in DFW. DFW and Atlanta politically and culturally are mirror images of each other. Also what distinguish them from Houston is there is a large concentrated black middle class. Houston has a slightly larger black population due to the Katrina effect, but its not as concentrated as the Dallas middle class. The biggest difference between Dallas & Atlanta is Dallas has Oak trees and Atlanta has the numerous Pine trees.
All of this is true indeed. The black communities in DFW and there Southern roots can't be ignored. Kirk Franklin is from Fort Worth I believe, and gospel music is HUGE there. But OVERALL, the whites there seem to be as "frontier west" COWBOY, as ANY other city in that north Texas Oklahoma region. And then you got the HUGE Mexican population, which is another story.
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Old 09-30-2009, 02:33 PM
 
2,531 posts, read 6,221,170 times
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Originally Posted by kdogg817 View Post
Basically what your doing is ignoring DFW southern roots and the towns in between. The South begins East of I 35 not I 45. You have to live here and experience it to really get a feel of the southern roots. Those big Mega Churches, gospel singers, and the soulful atmosphere of Dallas can't be ignored. Brown and Cora natives of the area from Tyler Perry plays attend church in Fort Worth, Texas. Gospel Artist Kirk Franklin is from Fort Worth, Texas you better believe we have strong proud southern tradition in DFW. DFW and Atlanta politically and culturally are mirror images of each other. Also what distinguish them from Houston is there is a large concentrated black middle class. Houston has a slightly larger black population due to the Katrina effect, but its not as concentrated as the Dallas middle class. The biggest difference between Dallas & Atlanta is Dallas has Oak trees and Atlanta has the numerous Pine trees.
I've always thought that Houston was supposedly the more "black-friendly" city in Texas. Don't get me wrong, Dallas is not too far behind, but it seems like Houston is held in higher regard (press, polls, events, etc.) in that instance. Not disputing what your saying, just trying to get a clear POV. Missouri City seems to be where the black middle class is going to in Houston, while in D/FW, the Best Southwest area and the southern portions of Arlington and Grand Prairie seem to be the major destination areas for the black middle class.

I'd say that they're still a bit more integrated than say, Stone Mountain/Lithonia here in Atlanta or Prince Georges County, MD outside DC.
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Old 09-30-2009, 02:37 PM
 
14,256 posts, read 26,789,930 times
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Originally Posted by kdogg817 View Post
Southern Characteristics as far as geography, but what about the people and the history. The entire south is not dominated by pine trees. A myth that should be dispelled.
Are you sure? I've seen the WHOLE South from VA DOWN TO Miami, all the way to Texas, and the furthest WEST I've been is Austin. EVERYWHERE I went was dominated by Piney Trees, with exception of Austin and Miami. That's probably the ONE thing that binds the South together, the SOLE thing that you can say EVERY Southern state has. Well at least in my opinion and observation.
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Old 09-30-2009, 02:37 PM
 
2,531 posts, read 6,221,170 times
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Originally Posted by kdogg817 View Post
Anybody been to Vickburg Mississppi. Its characteristics are very similar to Dallas.

Raymond, Mississppi "The Battle of Raymond" site from the civil war....


[TMP] Exploring Mississippi Battlefields

I lived in Jackson, MS for almost a decade (and I have peoples in Raymond and gambled in Vicksburg). The topography and trees are a bit different. They resemble Tyler and Marshall in character, look and feel a lot more than they do Dallas. Which makes sense, considering they're on the Gulf Coastal plain and Dallas is on a prairie.

However, the housing styles couldn't be more alike. A lot of the 60's and 70's era ranch houses in the D/FW area look just like my grandmother's neighborhood in North Jackson.
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Old 09-30-2009, 02:41 PM
 
14,256 posts, read 26,789,930 times
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Originally Posted by jluke65780 View Post
I disagree big time. Austin would definitely fit more into the southern category than San Antonio. The whole "Austin" feels like California or more western is overrated. The city has southern influence to me.
Yes indeed it does have a Southern influence to it, within the Black community, and the native whites tend to have Southern accents. But that's basically where it ENDS. Nothing more. EVERYTHING ELSE, including the Tejano influence, Cactus being native to the area, No pine trees, Limestone hills, dry grassland and shrubbery, proximity to South Texas, all of that gives it a undeniably Western influence.
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