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Old 03-23-2010, 06:17 PM
 
11,289 posts, read 26,191,557 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by westhou View Post
I wouldn't be surprised if Houston became the 3rd largest. With the size of the city limits there is just so much room for growth. Most cities have much smaller city limits so you can be near the city but not be within the city limits. Our city limit encompasses an area that most cities would call their suburbs. Seems to be a bit unfair when it comes to ranking the cities. If Chicago spread out their city limit to be the size of Houston they probably wouldn't be challenged by Houston in the ranking.
Well if Chicago blew its city limits out to 600 square miles it would have around 4.5 million people.

I don't think Houston will take the 3rd place as of right now.

Houston is expected to have grown by 300,000 people to around 2.2 million as of 2008, and Chicago is estimated to have around 2.9 million. I don't think Houston is going to get over 700,000 people from 2008 to 2010.


I don't think there's going to be many huge surprises given how the Census has gotten into the habit of doing much more involved estimates than they use to in past decades.

Slow steady growth in areas like NYC, Boston, Chicago, San Fran, etc.

High growth in the sunbelt cities.

Population loses in Philly, Detroit, Cleveland.

Cities that had been falling like Milwaukee, St. Louis and Cincy are holding steady and slowly growing again.


A lot of it just comes down to who has vacant land to grow on, and who's already built out.
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Old 03-23-2010, 06:44 PM
 
Location: Houston
6,870 posts, read 14,854,658 times
Reputation: 5891
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago60614 View Post
Well if Chicago blew its city limits out to 600 square miles it would have around 4.5 million people.

I don't think Houston will take the 3rd place as of right now.

Houston is expected to have grown by 300,000 people to around 2.2 million as of 2008, and Chicago is estimated to have around 2.9 million. I don't think Houston is going to get over 700,000 people from 2008 to 2010.


I don't think there's going to be many huge surprises given how the Census has gotten into the habit of doing much more involved estimates than they use to in past decades.

Slow steady growth in areas like NYC, Boston, Chicago, San Fran, etc.

High growth in the sunbelt cities.

Population loses in Philly, Detroit, Cleveland.

Cities that had been falling like Milwaukee, St. Louis and Cincy are holding steady and slowly growing again.


A lot of it just comes down to who has vacant land to grow on, and who's already built out.
Houston has waaaaaay too much vacant land and too many suburban neighborhoods taking up space within the inner loop. It annoys me most that the people living within those sprawling suburban neighborhoods within the inner loop complain when the city wants to make changes to make the area more dense (Ashbury tower, Richmond line). Houston really is a mess when it comes to the layout and that's why it would be sad if we do add enough people to surpass Chicago. It's such a headache to get to the different districts within the city limits because the public transportation and freeways are a mess. The future Uptown line will be the biggest joke of them all with the Richmond line coming in at a close second. It would have been great if all the districts were connected by rail in a smart manner but because of all those Inner loop suburbs the lines will be nothing but a waste of money and not used very often. Population growth should only take place with smart planning and that's definitely not the case here.
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Old 03-23-2010, 07:04 PM
 
Location: Mission Viejo, CA
2,498 posts, read 11,437,098 times
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Most of the California Department of Finance population estimates should be pretty right on. The US Census and the population estimate taken from the CA Department of Finance usually only have a very small difference and the CA estimate is considered more accurate by some.

This is what the CA Department of Finance currently has (I ROUNDED).
For the 10 major big cities in CA look for numbers around this:
Los Angeles: 4,000,000
San Diego: 1,350,000
San Jose: 1,000,000
San Francisco: 850,000
Fresno: 495,000
Long Beach: 492,000
Sacramento: 481,000
Oakland: 425,000
Santa Ana: 355,000
Anaheim: 345,000

Biggest Urban/Metro/CSA Areas in California:
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Riverside CSA (Greater Los Angeles): 18,500,000
San Francisco-Oakland-San Jose CSA (The Bay Area): 7,645,000
San Diego-Carlsbad-San Marcos MSA: 3,173,407
Sacramento-Arden-Arcade-Roseville MSA: 2,150,000

California as a whole should have around 38,000,000
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Old 03-23-2010, 07:57 PM
 
Location: Virginia Beach, VA
11,157 posts, read 13,999,826 times
Reputation: 14940
The U.S. Census Bureau just released estimates for counties and metro areas today.
Denver county (which is the same as the city) had 610,345 which is an all time high for the city/county. At this rate it should hit 625,000-630,000 for the official 2010 count, which will be released in July next year.
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Old 03-23-2010, 08:32 PM
 
Location: Cleveland bound with MPLS in the rear-view
5,509 posts, read 11,875,397 times
Reputation: 2501
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZLiam View Post
Can't speak for the other cities, but Phoenix is the 5th youngest city in the US. Are you trolling?
Not if the populaton growth is fueled by retiring empty-nesters......I was making light of the Healthcare Reform and its potential impact on state budgets -- or at least as I understood it...
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Old 03-23-2010, 09:18 PM
 
Location: Surprise, AZ
8,613 posts, read 10,143,894 times
Reputation: 7969
Quote:
Originally Posted by west336 View Post
Not if the populaton growth is fueled by retiring empty-nesters......I was making light of the Healthcare Reform and its potential impact on state budgets -- or at least as I understood it...
What makes you think that the population growth has been fueled by retiring empty-nesters?
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Old 03-23-2010, 10:08 PM
 
2,744 posts, read 6,110,118 times
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San Antonio city nearly 1.5 million and metro nearly 2.3 million.

Austin proper 820,000
metro 1.8 million.
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Old 03-23-2010, 11:13 PM
 
Location: Houston, TX
571 posts, read 1,281,832 times
Reputation: 295
Quote:
Originally Posted by westhou View Post
Houston has waaaaaay too much vacant land and too many suburban neighborhoods taking up space within the inner loop. It annoys me most that the people living within those sprawling suburban neighborhoods within the inner loop complain when the city wants to make changes to make the area more dense (Ashbury tower, Richmond line). Houston really is a mess when it comes to the layout and that's why it would be sad if we do add enough people to surpass Chicago. It's such a headache to get to the different districts within the city limits because the public transportation and freeways are a mess. The future Uptown line will be the biggest joke of them all with the Richmond line coming in at a close second. It would have been great if all the districts were connected by rail in a smart manner but because of all those Inner loop suburbs the lines will be nothing but a waste of money and not used very often. Population growth should only take place with smart planning and that's definitely not the case here.
Those protesting the Richmond Line annoy me to no end. Granted, when all the proposed lines get built Houston will still be no where near NY or DC when it comes to public transportation but it'll be better than what we've got now! Honestly, I live a few blocks from the East Line which is being built right now and on some days I REALLY don't want to drive...like REEEALLY...and the East Line would take me right to where I need to be.

Honestly, I think that Houston should consider turning some of the HOV lanes into tracks and having commuter type trains run into and out of the suburbs...SOMETHING!. Although, I'll admit, the 8-lane autobahn that is I-10 can be fun to drive on sometimes
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Old 03-23-2010, 11:39 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
13,966 posts, read 24,156,607 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DailyJournalist View Post
I predict Texas, Georgia, and the Carolinas will be the biggest gainers. While Florida will see a major drop in population compared to recent estimates.

The Northeast will remain steady with moderate growth, especially in the metros of NYC, Philadelphia, Boston, and DC.

Midwest states like Ohio and Michigan may see a decline, while the west coast as a whole should remain steady.
I agree with your other biggest gainers (percentage wise) but I disagree with what you say about Florida. Certainly FL has not grown by the huge numbers as of late but, remember, the Census comparisons are once every ten years and Florida's growth since 2000 has been tremendous.
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Old 03-23-2010, 11:54 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
13,966 posts, read 24,156,607 times
Reputation: 14762
...on a unrelated note to my last post...
Wake County (Raleigh) surpasses Mecklenburg County (Charlotte) as the most populated county in the State of NC. Raleigh grows by about 45% since 2000 to reach ~400,000 in its city limits. Raleigh's adjacent suburban towns grow by huge percentages and are among the fastest growing communities in the nation over the last ten years.

MiamiDade County in FL reaches 2.5 official residents but hundreds of thousands of undocumented residents go uncounted for fear of deportation despite the county's best efforts to assure them that the Census does not result in a witch hunt.
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