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Old 01-06-2014, 03:13 PM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
1,523 posts, read 1,860,385 times
Reputation: 1225

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Since half of Clevelanders and all of the national media seem so negative about Cleveland, I always assumed that NE Ohio lost a lot of people in the past few decades, especially since the city of Cleveland witnessed significant decline in population. To my surprise, the region as a whole actually gained residents despite a 0.38 percent decline in 2012:

Census estimates show Greater Cleveland population down slightly | cleveland.com

Quote:
In 1960, some 2,825,417 people lived in the eight counties that make up the government-defined Cleveland-Akron area. In 2012, the population totaled an estimated 2,866,186 in those counties. At the same time, however, the country has grown about 75 percent to more than 300 million people.
So we did bad considering that the country grew 75 percent. However, we still gained people, which is hard to believe considering our reliance on declining manufacturing.

I think that the population will see strong growth starting very soon, and that opinion is probably in the minority. Ignore the pessimists and start buying property if you are lucky enough to live in the area. Unfortunately, I am not, and cannot afford anything in my new location (Seattle area). So glad I bought my place in Euclid despite so many warning me not to (the most profitable investment I have ever made in my life). Waterfront and even water-proximate (like most of Euclid) property in Seattle costs $1 million minimum.

Last edited by usernametaken; 01-06-2014 at 03:36 PM..

 
Old 01-06-2014, 08:02 PM
 
79 posts, read 144,559 times
Reputation: 32
From 1960 to 1970, the Cleveland metro area grew at a respectable pace. From 1970 till 2000, most people moved from cuyahoga county to suburban counties (with little immigration). From 2000 till today, people are starting to leave the Cleveland area entirely (and deaths exceed births), while immigration is still low. That trend is accelerating, which means in 50 years, Cleveland will probably stabilize to a metro area of Louisville size and importance. Pretty hard fall from the 1970s, when Cleveland was more akin to Houston's current level of national importance.
 
Old 01-06-2014, 08:12 PM
 
Location: Cleveland
4,665 posts, read 4,977,549 times
Reputation: 6023
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cali1976 View Post
From 1960 to 1970, the Cleveland metro area grew at a respectable pace. From 1970 till 2000, most people moved from cuyahoga county to suburban counties (with little immigration). From 2000 till today, people are starting to leave the Cleveland area entirely (and deaths exceed births), while immigration is still low. That trend is accelerating, which means in 50 years, Cleveland will probably stabilize to a metro area of Louisville size and importance. Pretty hard fall from the 1970s, when Cleveland was more akin to Houston's current level of national importance.
Which trend is accelerating, of the three you list?
 
Old 01-06-2014, 08:16 PM
 
79 posts, read 144,559 times
Reputation: 32
Deaths exceeding births is probably the fastest growing. Anyone with skills and opportunities has left Cleveland. The people left are pensioners, welfare recipients, and folks in healthcare or govt jobs (and the people who serve them)
 
Old 01-06-2014, 08:31 PM
 
Location: Cleveland
4,665 posts, read 4,977,549 times
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Deaths didn't exceed births in the Cleveland-Akron area at least through 2009:

Cleveland-Akron area is third in the nation in population loss from 2008 to 2009 | cleveland.com

Do you have some information I don't?
 
Old 01-06-2014, 08:38 PM
 
79 posts, read 144,559 times
Reputation: 32
It's 2014. And the trend is clearly pointing in favor of my assessment
 
Old 01-06-2014, 08:39 PM
 
Location: Cleveland
4,665 posts, read 4,977,549 times
Reputation: 6023
OK, do you have evidence supporting that?
 
Old 01-06-2014, 08:43 PM
 
79 posts, read 144,559 times
Reputation: 32
No
 
Old 01-06-2014, 10:49 PM
 
4,361 posts, read 7,177,213 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tribecavsbrowns View Post
OK, do you have evidence supporting that?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cali1976 View Post
No
I'm shocked.
 
Old 01-06-2014, 11:22 PM
 
79 posts, read 144,559 times
Reputation: 32
Shocked I don't have data at my fingertips to substantiate the deaths claim, or shocked that Cleveland is one of a select group of metropolitan areas that has the same population it had in 1960 while the US population has increased 75%?
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