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Old 03-25-2021, 08:31 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WaterLvr View Post
Thank you @SlideRules99. I may take you up on the car transport service recommendation, I have a 2015 Jetta with pretty low ground clearance. I might just sell it here and get something a little more snow friendly after I arrive.

I’m currently reading your “Charming Towns” thread. It’s taking awhile because I keep going back to realtordotcom to check out houses in each one. I’m really looking forward to my trip to Cleveland later in the year to see all of these places in person.

Thank you also @WRnative, I did subscribe to clevelanddotcom. Also following your links on snow. It’s interesting, CBS Sunday morning show did a segment on how climate change is affecting where people are moving and mentioned Cleveland. I’ve rewatched it several times.

This link might work for the segment.

https://www.cbs.com/shows/cbs-sunday...eather-events/

I don’t know if these @‘s work to tag posters. Still new here but it works for another board I’m on.
Exceptional link, which marks the first time on a major network that I've seen U.S. "climate change" and "climate change refugees" mentioned along with Cleveland as possible target destination city. It confirms much of what I've been arguing in this forum for several years about Cleveland being a premier climate change destination city. E.g., see post 16 and subsequent posts here:

https://www.city-data.com/forum/clev...-travel-2.html

The CBS Sunday Morning report is based on "How to Prepare for Climate Change," a new book by famed technology and science writer and broadcaster David Pogue, who also is a correspondent for CBS Sunday Morning.

<<You might not realize it, but we’re already living through the beginnings of climate chaos.>>

https://www.simonandschuster.com/boo.../9781982134518

It's interesting that this book was released over a year ago, and only now is receiving publicity, even on CBS which notoriously features books published by CBS affiliate Simon & Schuster on "60 Minutes." It reinforces my belief that self-censorship is the norm about the inevitable reality of climate change.

In the segment, one focus is on the Great Lakes as a target region for those fleeing climate change, and features Madison, WI. The segment makes it sound as if Madison is located on the Great Lakes. It is not; it's over an hour from Milwaukee and Lake Michigan. Madison is part of the Mississippi River watershed and not the Great Lakes watershed (which means under the current U.S./Canadian treaty governing use of Great Lakes water resources, it likely can't rely on Lake Michigan water even if plagued in the future by severe drought).

https://urbanmilwaukee.com/2015/08/1...ichigan-water/

Reportedly due to climate change, drought conditions are becoming more commonplace in the western U.S. This article explains how climate change will make living in the Southwest more problematic, but also how drought conditions conceivably will engulf the Great Plains, possibly reaching as far east as Madison.

<<La Nina, a cool patch of water across the equatorial Pacific Ocean that helped push the winter storm track away from California, is partly to blame for this year’s dryness. But a bigger factor is climate change, which is fueling a ridge of high pressure off the coast, effectively keeping storms away “and leaving the southwestern states mostly warm, dry, and prone to wildfires,’’ said Jennifer Francis, a senior scientist at the Woodwell Climate Research Center....

The pain could spread eastward into the corn belt if spring rains don’t sweep the Great Plains, where very little snow fell this past winter. As much of one-third of winter wheat in the region could be damaged by water scarcity, a cruel ending to a season marked by devastating cold. ``In some places it is going to be tough to tell the damage from drought and freeze out there,’’ Rippey said.>>

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/featu...imate-disaster

The segment says climate refugees will look for good weather, but also for lower cost of living, art, hospitals, pro sports, etc. I am unaware of any other city that offers Cleveland's combo of cultural (especially high culture) amenities, great hospitals, pro sports, and also a lower but increasing cost of home ownership. I would throw in natural amenities and park systems, let alone Lake Erie.

Madison, WI, IMO is a boring place to live compared with Cleveland. It is a Columbus-like college town and state capital, with none of the industrial age legacies (especially premier cultural and healthcare institutions) found in Cleveland. I would rather live in Columbus -- better sports, better amenities and better location. Despite claims to the contrary, Milwaukee's cultural institutions are regional institutions, not remotely on par with those in Cleveland. I was shocked when I visited the Milwaukee Art Museum just a few years ago. Madison is two hours from Chicago, but four hours from Minneapolis, both cities with great cultural institutions. Columbus is two hours from both Cleveland and Cincinnati, but also has easy access to cultural institutions in Dayton, Toledo, and Akron, and is only 2-3 hours from Indianapolis and Pittsburgh. It's a reasonable day trip to the great cities of the East Coast, and just a few hours to mountains, including great rafting on the New River in WV. It's five hours from Chicago and three hours from Detroit and many great destinations in Kentucky. Ohio Amish Country and especially the Mohican Region are nearby, as are great state parks such as Hocking Hills. Madison offers nothing on par with the Columbus Zoo/The Wilds.

Last edited by WRnative; 03-25-2021 at 09:11 AM..
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Old 03-25-2021, 09:45 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WaterLvr View Post
But not used to Cleveland snow.
Don't worry about it. Heavy snow is only a few times a year, and even then it gets cleared from the roads pretty quickly. I am disappointed in how people don't clear their sidewalks in a timely manner, though....if they even clear them at all, that is.

If you purchase a home with a driveway and sidewalk, keep in mind you will have to budget to contract with a snow removal service each winter.

Quote:
I know a condo would be wise, but I’m drawn to University Heights
How about a condo in Shaker Heights or Shaker Square? You can get the benefits of being in a condo, while still being tucked right into a "regular" neighborhood that you can walk around in.

Also the condos in these areas are very close to the Blue and Green rapid light rail lines, which is a great benefit if you don't want to drive or deal with parking everywhere.

Being in these condo districts might also help you build social connections more easily.

Quote:
Originally Posted by greenvillebuckeye View Post
Maybe not Cleveland, but looking at home prices in Toledo at age 40 has had me thinking about moving back after being away these 17 years. Could drop my savings down on a decent home in the Glass City right now and never have a mortgage again.
I am curious if she has any specific thing drawing her to the Cleveland metro. $150-$200k is definitely doable here, but it can go further in other parts of Ohio.

Though one big perk of Cleveland, and the Heights in particular, is the good public transit and healthcare access, which can matter a great deal as one ages.
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Old 03-25-2021, 10:31 AM
 
9,838 posts, read 6,641,455 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ferraris View Post
Don't worry about it. Heavy snow is only a few times a year, and even then it gets cleared from the roads pretty quickly. I am disappointed in how people don't clear their sidewalks in a timely manner, though....if they even clear them at all, that is.

If you purchase a home with a driveway and sidewalk, keep in mind you will have to budget to contract with a snow removal service each winter.
Most persons, especially retired persons, don't contract with a snow removal service. The few persons that I know who have done so in recent years consider it a big waste of money. Most retired persons rely on thaws to clear their driveways sufficiently to be able to drive in the rare case the driveway apron is too deep (due to street plows) to drive through. Some use neighborhood kids, or perhaps pay neighbors. The handful of times I used my snow blower this year (I live in the snowbelt), rather than shovel, I did the driveways of a couple neighbors gratis. It doesn't take much extra time, and it doesn't aggravate what I hate most about using a snow blower -- cleaning out snow after I use it. I'm obsessive about cleaning my drive and house walks and steps, partially because I've enjoyed the process since I was a kid, and I consider it a good way to get outside in the winter more regularly. I wear a ski mask when the temperature is much below freezing to avoid breathing cold air directly.

For a retired person who wants their driveway cleared, and can wait several hours or perhaps even a day, before the winter season call local snow removal services and ask which offer "per shove" services. Call them when you want your driveway cleared (many persons just drive through most snowfalls without clearing their driveways), and they will clear your driveway after they've completed their contractual obligations. Pay them in cash and they'll be very, very happy. When I've decided to wait for a thaw in the past, I've actually had gypsy snow plowers knock on my door and offer a "per shove" service; if you find a good "per shove" service, don't lose the phone number!

The most important consideration IMO for a retired, especially older, person is to buy a residence with an attached garage. Know and respect black ice as it is the most dangerous aspect of winter IMO, especially for pedestrians. It is more frequent given warming winters and more numerous freeze/thaw cycles. Learn to walk on snow rather than icy/paved surfaces when possible.

Consider buying a small freezer. Three cubic uprights are available and they greatly enhance the ability to wait out a snowfall. So does a big kitchen or basement pantry.

BTW, many northeast Ohio communities, in Lake County townships as well as cities, use sidewalk plows to clear sidewalks before the beginning of school days, even if there is only a few inches of snow. For persons that like to walk daily, perhaps this is a consideration (buy slip-resistant shoes such as worn by mailmen, much better than "ducks" and other winter shoes that claim to be slip resistant).
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Old 03-25-2021, 10:42 AM
 
9,838 posts, read 6,641,455 times
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Originally Posted by WaterLvr View Post
Thank you also @WRnative, I did subscribe to clevelanddotcom.
Perhaps also consider subscribing to Cleveland Magazine. They soon will be publishing their 2021 "Rating the Suburbs" issue, which isn't available online, and sometimes is stolen from libraries.

https://clevelandmagazine.com/at-hom...ng-the-suburbs
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Old 03-25-2021, 10:46 AM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
41,978 posts, read 52,142,174 times
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We lived in NE Ohio for over 40 years, so I understand the charms of living there that draw you. We moved to the south, which is OK, but we miss the seasons in Ohio. The only thing I grew to hate about Ohio, is that the sun didn’t shine from January to May. We fought this by taking a trip to anywhere sunny every year.

I’m a few years older than you, and if I were you, I’d go for it. I’m not familiar with the Cleveland neighborhoods, but I feel sure you could find a sweet little house to buy or rent. I’m sure you know that the medical care is stellar there.

Driving in snow is like riding a bike. If you’ve done it before you can always do it.

What’s the worst that could happen? If you don’t like it, you can go somewhere else.
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Old 03-27-2021, 06:58 PM
 
170 posts, read 77,083 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WaterLvr View Post
But first I’d like the perspective from folks that live here or who’ve moved here in the last few years and I have a couple questions.

I’m used to snow, I can drive in the snow, I even love it. I have Blizzaks on my car right now. But not used to Cleveland snow. I can handle 9-10” of snowfall, but what concerns me is 3-4 months of it. Can a single, tough but soon to be old lady handle it?

Also, I have 3 cats, so renting will be a problem. Could I find a safe neighborhood to buy a $150-200k house? East or West side doesn’t matter, but safe does. I know a condo would be wise, but I’m drawn to University Heights, the housing stock there just makes me happy, even in my price range.

I’d appreciate any insight I can get. I’ve turned here a lot as I’ve searched and I’ve gotten so much help from others experiences.
If you like University Heights, you like the older housing stock. Here in CLE, that means (more often than not) the East side.

I just boomeranged back myself from Boston to Shaker Heights. I am younger than you, and have Blizzaks on my car. They were SO not needed. We received 2 fairly significant storms this year, the rest were just a few inches here/there. Snow removal is VERY good here, within 4-8 hours most major arteries were down to wet pavement, pretty much all streets to pavement within 24.

You can still buy in Shaker in that price range (the upper end), particularly in the Lomond neighborhood. Cleveland Heights you can definately buy in your price range...and the taxes are lower too! (schools aren't as good, but you don't need to worry about that!) I was surpised how expensive University Heights is, though. But they pretty much share the same housing stock with CH.

Cleveland Heights definitely has some more marginal areas going towards the East Cleveland Border...and there is 1 area of Shaker that is still a bit iffy (borders 1 particularly depressed CLE neighborhood) but just check out some of the previous threads for more specific guidance.

If it helps, I've heard many driveway/walkway plowing contracts to be in the $400ish range for the season here in Shaker. Personally, I prefer it, but to each their own

I think many of the condos in "The Heights" (Cleveland/Shaker/University) are pre-WWII so you might be able to find the charm while still enjoying a bit less maintenance hassle. I know my Mom (a bit older than you) just sold her home and moved into a condo and she LOVES not having to worry about lawn/plowing/roofing. So definitely check out the condos.

Also, who says you have to buy right away? You could rent for a year (or two) to at least allow the COVID portion of market fever to calm down....also, it may allow you to 'check out' different neighborhoods to make sure you are buying in the one that feels right.



Finally, it is DEFINATELY gray here in the winter. But, if you are on the coastal side of the West Coast ranges, it's pretty gray there too. So you might be trading like for like. Get a SAD light, or take vitamin D, or just get outside...it's manageable, but it was definately a shocker after being in Boston (and VT) for many years.

Last edited by TechieTechie; 03-27-2021 at 07:08 PM..
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Old 03-28-2021, 01:34 AM
 
9,838 posts, read 6,641,455 times
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Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
We lived in NE Ohio for over 40 years, so I understand the charms of living there that draw you. We moved to the south, which is OK, but we miss the seasons in Ohio. The only thing I grew to hate about Ohio, is that the sun didn’t shine from January to May. We fought this by taking a trip to anywhere sunny every year.
Winter trips are great, but I've discovered just getting outside and hiking in the winter, even on cloudy days, alleviates the gloom substantially. Warmer winter temperatures and other less harsh conditions (much shallower snow accumulations and less severe winds/wind chills) make winter hiking much more palatable.

As I'm unaware of any source of current cloud cover percentages, I can't document my theory that winter cloudy days are decreasing in Cleveland along with the frequency and severity of winter storms in northeast Ohio. Why? As the Arctic warms rapidly, winter weather no longer is dominated by northern storm, low pressure fronts. Southern storm fronts and good weather, high pressure zones are becoming more dominant.

You probably remember when "Alberta clippers" was a favorite term and topic of discussion among Cleveland weathermen. No longer. I don't remember ever hearing the term this past winter.

This thread discusses in more detail the changes in Cleveland winter weather.

https://www.city-data.com/forum/clev...east-ohio.html

Persons who consider the historic difference in cloud cover in Cleveland vs. other cities/regions, especially in the Southeast, should ponder whether these differences are worth the high humidity, high temperature, increasing climate change impacts (sea level rise, more severe storms, including tornadoes outside of hurricane season) becoming increasing burden in the Southeast.

See cloud cover statistics for Cleveland and Atlanta here, but also look at humidity and temperature data:

https://weatherspark.com/y/18154/Ave...tes-Year-Round

https://weatherspark.com/y/15598/Ave...tes-Year-Round

Check out the "Great Climate Change Migration" report discussed in this thread (post 22) and consider when the getting not only will be good, but perhaps even necessary.

https://www.city-data.com/forum/clev...-travel-3.html

I actually don't enjoy promoting Cleveland, as I detest sprawl, and enjoy the relatively uncrowded nature of life in NE Ohio. I detest the disappearance of farmland and open space, and I certainly am appalled by the anti-science, anti-democratic politics prevalent in the Southeast, and to a lesser but still significant extent now in Ohio. Yet, reality is reality, and hopefully persons that feel as I do will exert pressure on our legislators to reign in sprawl and prepare for a likely explosion in population over the next two decades.

Increasing tornado frequency and severity are the latest concern that may drive persons from the Southeast.

<<This threat comes as a new study shows tornadoes are often much stronger and wider than typically estimated by the National Weather Service — estimating that over 20% of tornadoes are capable of causing catastrophic damage, equal to the highest intensity EF4 to EF5 ratings. >>

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/tornado...essee-alabama/

<<This is the change Dr. Gensini observed: it shows a decrease in tornadoes in the brown color in the Plains, an increase east in that green color…including the Carolinas. The core of tornado alley is shifting east into the Mid-South and Southeast....

Climate change is making droughts in the southwest worse, expanding the dry air and expanding deserts to the east. As the traditional tornado alley loses moisture — the key ingredient for tornadoes — areas east are seeing a muggy surge....

But what is most concerning…these changes are happening fast. Over our life spans, not thousands of years.>>

https://www.weather.gov/lmk/niu_tornado_frequency_study

How nice is that tornadoes currently remain a minimal worry in Greater Cleveland, especially northeast of Cleveland?

Last edited by WRnative; 03-28-2021 at 01:54 AM..
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Old 03-28-2021, 02:08 PM
 
1,678 posts, read 3,928,196 times
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Originally Posted by WaterLvr View Post
I have to admit that the drive does worry me. So much can go wrong. I’ve driven from southern Calif to Seattle with 2 cats, but I was much younger.
I’m going to think about flying. I have friends that might help out. They have family in Detroit and for free tickets, they might be willing to each take a cat. Then I’d just have to rent a car and drive to Cleveland.
I’ll have to look into transporting my Jetta.

Thanks for the ideas. Really gives me some things to think about.



I had 2 cats when I moved from NY to Texas. I bought a friend a ticket so she could fly with me and we each could have one cat in the cabin with us. She was also a flight attendant but I paid for her seat just to be absolutely sure she would be on the flight with me and not bumped off. I also did not want to deal with a long car drive with the cats. Even then I begged the vet to sedate the cats as much as possible! I kid you not I worried for MONTHS about going thru airport security with them as they HAD to be removed from their carriers! I had visions of a frantic, stressed-out cat tearing out of my arms and running off into the terminal never to be seen again...but it was over in a few minutes and each was fine. I also had them collared and leashed.



I sold my beater car before moving and bought a better one in Texas, so that was not an issue for me. But IMO moving is absolute HELL, even if you want to and are happy about your destination.


So I will follow your saga here... good luck to you!!
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Old 03-29-2021, 07:17 AM
 
10 posts, read 4,641 times
Reputation: 25
I just wrote out a long post and when I posted, it omitted most of it. So I deleted it as it didn’t make sense. Not sure what happened but I’ll go back and find the rules for posting.
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Old 03-29-2021, 07:17 AM
 
Location: Wooster, Ohio
2,117 posts, read 1,306,467 times
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WRnative:

This source does not have data for cloud cover directly, but it does have solar radiation in Langleys:
https://www.oardc.ohio-state.edu/weather1/

Way back when, the Wooster Sewage Plant was on their mailing list, and received monthly weather summaries, which were used as a part of the monthly Plant Operation Report.

I'm so glad I caught your comment about cloud cover. In my search to respond, I found that this site has historical records in PDF form prior to 1982. I am curious about the winter of 1978-1979. The book, Kentucky Weather by Jerry Hill states that it was another bad winter, but I don't remember it. I remember the winters of 1976-1977 and 1977-1978 quite well. Cruel, wicked weather; just no other way to put it. According to Dick Goddard's book United States Weather Ohio Edition, the winter of 1976-1977 was the coldest in recorded history for this part of the nation. The winter of 1977-1978, which occurred after the publication of the book, was even colder.
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