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Old 01-18-2020, 01:42 PM
 
5,251 posts, read 2,584,910 times
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National Hurricane Center averages are here: https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/climo/ - Per this page Wilmington NC area sees the center/eye of a Cat1/2 within 58 miles every 6yrs, and Cat3+ every 17yrs. Just averages mind you. You'll see more hurricanes then that though as those average don't take into account center/eye of storms 59+ miles away, and hurricanes are a few hundred miles in diameter, but worse weather is typically found at the eye/center and less from that point. Storms typically are trying to recurve up and out to sea and come near when they can't turn in time. Florence was a rare exception of a storm moving in from from the East. The HurricaneCity link above has it's own averages but a lot of useful info as well.

If live near the water you'll want to also look at storm surge maps, but Wilmington is not as susceptible to storm surge as other areas nearby (be sure to change the category number at top of page as surge is usually higher the stronger the storm, and map is considered accurate down at 'neighborhood' level once you've zoomed in): https://noaa.maps.arcgis.com/apps/Ma...935fad&entry=1

You'll also want to check out the FEMA flood maps, search by address here (you'll have to zoom in and click on the map sometimes for the flood plane layers to appear): https://msc.fema.gov/portal/search Keep in mind any terms you see such as 100year or 500year flood are actually your annual chance so a 500year flood is actually a 1 in 500 chance (or 0.2% odds) of occurring any given year. The terminology causes confusion and yes they are looking at changing it to better convey.

The main hazards of a hurricane are winds (tree/power and if strong enough then structural issues), storm surge (rise in water above the normal tide level) (largest risk), rainfall flooding (second largest risk), small brief tornadoes, rough surf,
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Old 01-18-2020, 04:23 PM
 
569 posts, read 225,916 times
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These statistics are based on historical data and don't reflect future trends. The absolute number one threat to coastal areas is ocean warming and rising sea levels. There was a very informative "60 Minutes" on this topic last Sunday. Even if the frequency of major storms doesn't change, the rise in sea levels will make their damage much more severe. In addition, ocean warming can cause major storms to meander longer and dump more rain than would historically be the case. Hurricane Florence is a perfect example of this, and it won't be the last.

I don't mean to scare the OP, or anyone else, but this a ticking time bomb and the US has not done enough to address this. North Carolina has none zero, and in fact, passed legislation a few years ago, limiting ocean warming studies and planning for terms not to exceed 30 years, sort of like they made actual climate change studies for the coast illegal. We were widely rediculed for doing that.
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Old 01-18-2020, 05:30 PM
 
2,064 posts, read 1,054,024 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Raleigh View Post
These statistics are based on historical data and don't reflect future trends. The absolute number one threat to coastal areas is ocean warming and rising sea levels. There was a very informative "60 Minutes" on this topic last Sunday. Even if the frequency of major storms doesn't change, the rise in sea levels will make their damage much more severe. In addition, ocean warming can cause major storms to meander longer and dump more rain than would historically be the case. Hurricane Florence is a perfect example of this, and it won't be the last.

I don't mean to scare the OP, or anyone else, but this a ticking time bomb and the US has not done enough to address this. North Carolina has none zero, and in fact, passed legislation a few years ago, limiting ocean warming studies and planning for terms not to exceed 30 years, sort of like they made actual climate change studies for the coast illegal. We were widely rediculed for doing that.
Then why recommend Charleston to OP? Whats the difference between Wilmington and Charleston, relative to this issue. And are you supporting, and voting for, politicians who acknowledge the reality of global warming and are putting forth policies to do something about it? (i.e. not Trump, Tillis, Burr, etc.)
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Old 01-18-2020, 07:46 PM
 
569 posts, read 225,916 times
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Originally Posted by Edward Teach View Post
Then why recommend Charleston to OP? Whats the difference between Wilmington and Charleston, relative to this issue. And are you supporting, and voting for, politicians who acknowledge the reality of global warming and are putting forth policies to do something about it? (i.e. not Trump, Tillis, Burr, etc.)
The original OP indicated that they were moving to Wilmington from Portland OR withought going into any detail as to why Wilmington specifically, and despite the fact that they had never been to Wilmington before. Furthermore the OP asked for feedback and opinions and I quote: "I want the good, the bad and the ugly."

I pointed out to the OP that coming from Portland, Charleston might be a better fit culturally, and I gave my reasons. Regarding sea level rising being a problem, I clearly stated that this applied to other cities in the southeast, and gave Charleston and Miami as examples. Frankly it applies to all coastal cities worldwide.

Dr. Orrin Pilkey is a retired geology professor from Duke University (Nicholas School of the Environment) and has written extensively about global warming concerns generally, and specifically its effects on the North Carolina coast. The News & Observer runs some of his writings occasionally. I would urge all non-believers to read his opinions, particularly the ones pertaining to the NC barrier islands and coastal cities. Rising sea levels will make the barrier islands essentially disappear in the not too distant future, according to Dr. Pilkey. Increased sea levels is the number one threat to all coastal areas. Period.

Trump, Tillis, Burr and company are irrelevant to this conversation.
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Old 01-18-2020, 07:57 PM
 
Location: NC But Soon, The Desert
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I'm glad I talked my fiance into moving out West rather than back to the coast (Wilmington area) where he's from. I am not fond of eastern NC at all. My favorite part is Western NC. Should we decide we don't care for desert life, if we come back to NC - highly unlikely - we'd move to the mountains. Hurricanes, humidity, heat...and for moderate little me, conservativism. OP might like it though.
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Old 01-18-2020, 08:03 PM
 
2,064 posts, read 1,054,024 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Raleigh View Post
The original OP indicated that they were moving to Wilmington from Portland OR withought going into any detail as to why Wilmington specifically, and despite the fact that they had never been to Wilmington before. Furthermore the OP asked for feedback and opinions and I quote: "I want the good, the bad and the ugly."

I pointed out to the OP that coming from Portland, Charleston might be a better fit culturally, and I gave my reasons. Regarding sea level rising being a problem, I clearly stated that this applied to other cities in the southeast, and gave Charleston and Miami as examples. Frankly it applies to all coastal cities worldwide.

Dr. Orrin Pilkey is a retired geology professor from Duke University (Nicholas School of the Environment) and has written extensively about global warming concerns generally, and specifically its effects on the North Carolina coast. The News & Observer runs some of his writings occasionally. I would urge all non-believers to read his opinions, particularly the ones pertaining to the NC barrier islands and coastal cities. Rising sea levels will make the barrier islands essentially disappear in the not too distant future, according to Dr. Pilkey. Increased sea levels is the number one threat to all coastal areas. Period.

Trump, Tillis, Burr and company are irrelevant to this conversation.
If Wilmington isn't appropriate for the OP due to sea level rise, then neither is Charleston. Period. What is SC doing that NC isn't?

I'd urge all non-global warming believers to pay attention to Dr. Pilkey as well. And of course, some of those non-believers include Trump, Tillis and Burr. Thus, they are quite relevant, especially since it will take coordinated international action by all nations to combat global warming. Anyone voting for those gentlemen while proclaiming to be concerned about sea level rise is a hypocrite.
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Old 01-18-2020, 08:20 PM
 
569 posts, read 225,916 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Edward Teach View Post
If Wilmington isn't appropriate for the OP due to sea level rise, then neither is Charleston. Period.

I'd urge all non-global warming believers to pay attention to Dr. Pilkey as well. And of course, some of those non-believers include Trump, Tillis and Burr. Thus, they are quite relevant, as it will take coordinated international action to combat global warming. Anyone voting for those gentlemen, while proclaiming to be concerned about sea level rise is a hypocrite.
The OP seemed intent on leaving Portland for Wilmington. The reasons are none of my business, and none were given. In that narrow sliver of communication, all I did was recommend that they consider Charleston as well. That's a cultural argument, not a global warming argument.

Regarding global warming and sea level rising, the OP can make their own decision as to whether or not that would be a factor in their choosing to relocate to the US Southeast coast.

I definitely blame the NC Government and the tourism lobby for blocking any reasonable discussion and planning for future problems on the coast caused by sea level changes. Spending hundreds of millions of dollars on "beach renourishment" is a silly waste of taxpayer dollars, and is most certainly not a reasonable plan.

All about the money. Someday, the bailout money won't be there.
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Old 01-18-2020, 08:34 PM
 
2,064 posts, read 1,054,024 times
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Originally Posted by Mr. Raleigh View Post
The OP seemed intent on leaving Portland for Wilmington. The reasons are none of my business, and none were given.
And given that, there's no reason to suggest Charleston, or anywhere else. The OP asked about Wilmington. Period. I don't know why people can't simply answer the question as asked. But again, if Wilmington doesn't work due to sea level rise, neither does Charleston, so mentioning it seems pointless.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Raleigh View Post
Regarding global warming and sea level rising, the OP can make their own decision as to whether or not that would be a factor in their choosing to relocate to the US Southeast coast.
They certainly can, and they didn't ask for anyone's opinions on the subject.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Raleigh View Post
I definitely blame the NC Government and the tourism lobby for blocking any reasonable discussion and planning for future problems on the coast caused by sea level changes. Spending hundreds of millions of dollars on "beach renourishment" is a silly waste of taxpayer dollars, and is most certainly not a reasonable plan.
And do you blame SC government for doing the same? What reasonable plan does SC have to combat sea level rise? And again, do you support politicians who acknowledge the reality of global warming and back policies to combat it? Thats the only way to actually solve the problem.
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Old 01-18-2020, 08:45 PM
 
569 posts, read 225,916 times
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Why are you badgering me ?

The OP asked for opinions and feedback: Quote "The good, the bad and the ugly". I would have never brought up Charleston had the OP not asked for feedback.

Regarding South Carolina, they have have done nothing to combat global warming, to the best of my knowledge. "60 MINUTES" did a piece about flooding in Charleston, and how the historic district would be in danger if nothing is done.


Please move on to another thread and stop attacking me. Thank you.
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Old 01-19-2020, 06:52 AM
 
4,026 posts, read 10,250,922 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Screenwriter70 View Post
I'm glad I talked my fiance into moving out West rather than back to the coast (Wilmington area) where he's from. I am not fond of eastern NC at all. My favorite part is Western NC. Should we decide we don't care for desert life, if we come back to NC - highly unlikely - we'd move to the mountains. Hurricanes, humidity, heat...and for moderate little me, conservativism. OP might like it though.
It really comes down to a person’s specific preferences, likes and dislikes. Personally, husband and I hate the desert....dislike NV, AZ, NM although I’ll admit there are pockets of beauty in each place. Driving outside of Phoenix, I felt I was on “the moon”. We also much prefer the beach to the mountains as we grew up in coastal New England.
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