U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > North Carolina > Coastal North Carolina
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-15-2020, 09:26 PM
 
2 posts, read 1,860 times
Reputation: 10

Advertisements

Hi,


I am sure if I take the time to sift through the myriad threads to answer most, if not all, of my questions, I am hoping some of you out there can help me via this new thread.


My husband and I are considering moving to the Wilmington area. We have never been there before but will be visiting for the first time the first week of May. I have wanted to move back to the East Coast for some time (I am originally from LI). I won't get into all the reasons why Wilmington specifically, but I am curious what those who live in or near the area have to say - I want the good, the bad, and the ugly. Websites can paint a rosy picture and there is only so much one can learn from a distance.


I have heard from several people that it is just lovely there. I have also heard people are rude, the area is expensive, and there are no jobs. However, the positive comments have been outranking the negatives.



For us, housing will be cheaper. We currently live in Portland, OR. We are fairly well educated and have good jobs. I am an accountant and my husband a manager by trade, so I think we should be able to find work somewhat quickly. We don't have children.



What neighborhoods should we check out? Which ones should we stay away from? How do the surrounding towns compare? How is traffic in and out of Wilmington? From maps, it looks like routes out of town are pretty sparse.


Thinking we should also meet with a few job agencies and maybe a relocation specialist to get a sense of the finer details. If anyone has suggestions, it would be greatly appreciated.


Thanks much,
A
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-16-2020, 06:46 AM
 
2,064 posts, read 1,054,024 times
Reputation: 2105
"I have heard from several people that it is just lovely there. I have also heard people are rude, the area is expensive, and there are no jobs."

Those are very subjective attributes, so its hard to give anything other than a subjective response, which may or may not be helpful to you. One person's beauty is another's ugly; one person's rude may be another's nice, etc.

It would be helpful to have more details on what you're looking for and what your expectations are:

1. Whats your housing budget?
2. What type of house do you want? Small, large, close-in neighborhood, suburban, rural, on a golf course, on the water, on the beach, etc.?
3. How long of a commute do you want?
4. What amenities do you want close by?

Etc., etc.

Here's some of my pros and cons:

Pros: Mild, sunny winters; great beaches; nice revitalized downtown; great restaurant scene; good arts amenities and entertainment; great natural beauty; lots of outdoor recreation opportunities (boating, fishing, etc.); real estate is fairly affordable for the most part.

Cons: Very hot, humid summers; economy is largely based on tourism, higher education and healthcare (I'm retired so this doesn't bother me); very fast growth; pockets of troublesome crime; somewhat isolated location (being on the coast and 2-3 hours from a larger city and 5 hours to the mountains); hurricanes; rush hour traffic can be bad in certain spots, especially during summer tourist season (and again "bad" is highly subjective).

I think a lot of people move here with outsized or unrealistic expectations, and of course that leads to disappointment. Wilmington is a fairly small city, and its only been in the past 20 to 25 years that its been "discovered". A lot of growth has occurred in that 25 years, and in some ways that growth overwhelmed the area. As I said, its also created unrealistic expectations. People have moved here and been unhappy because there isn't an eastern european grocery store, for example; or they have move to a somewhat remote part of the area and complain there is nothing to do. With careful consideration and realistic expectations, this is a great place to live.

Depending on what kind of accounting work you do and what industry your husband is in, you probably will find jobs. They'll most likely pay less than Portland.

Some of the more popular smaller towns around Wilmington include Leland, Hampstead and Carolina Beach.

Here are some existing threads that may be helpful:

https://www.city-data.com/forum/coas...nc-headed.html
https://www.city-data.com/forum/coas...pe-winter.html
https://www.city-data.com/forum/coas...ilmington.html
https://www.city-data.com/forum/coas...ilmington.html
https://www.city-data.com/forum/coas...on-nc-bad.html
https://www.city-data.com/forum/coas...cating-ny.html
https://www.city-data.com/forum/coas...a-instead.html
https://www.city-data.com/forum/coas...ome-towns.html

Last edited by Edward Teach; 01-16-2020 at 08:05 AM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-16-2020, 07:53 AM
 
Location: Sneads Ferry, NC
11,919 posts, read 21,898,104 times
Reputation: 5625
Quote:
Originally Posted by Edward Teach View Post
......
Cons: Very hot summers; ......
Add to the Cons: very high humidity and bugs. That makes being outside in summer very uncomfortable. I know Portland and have been there in the summer. Also the risk of hurricanes is real, and that adds to the cost of your homeowners insurance.

Add to the Pros: Pleasant, mostly sunny weather in the winters.

Mixed: - You will not find the regulations on development that there is in Portland. Here, we have clear-cutting and open burning by developers in many areas. If you have asthma, that may be a problem.
- Politics tends to be more conservative here, and religion is more influential at the state level.

Last edited by goldenage1; 01-16-2020 at 08:59 AM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-16-2020, 09:15 AM
 
2,700 posts, read 3,825,556 times
Reputation: 1575
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nycoor View Post
Hi,


I am sure if I take the time to sift through the myriad threads to answer most, if not all, of my questions, I am hoping some of you out there can help me via this new thread.


My husband and I are considering moving to the Wilmington area. We have never been there before but will be visiting for the first time the first week of May. I have wanted to move back to the East Coast for some time (I am originally from LI). I won't get into all the reasons why Wilmington specifically, but I am curious what those who live in or near the area have to say - I want the good, the bad, and the ugly. Websites can paint a rosy picture and there is only so much one can learn from a distance.


I have heard from several people that it is just lovely there. I have also heard people are rude, the area is expensive, and there are no jobs. However, the positive comments have been outranking the negatives.



For us, housing will be cheaper. We currently live in Portland, OR. We are fairly well educated and have good jobs. I am an accountant and my husband a manager by trade, so I think we should be able to find work somewhat quickly. We don't have children.



What neighborhoods should we check out? Which ones should we stay away from? How do the surrounding towns compare? How is traffic in and out of Wilmington? From maps, it looks like routes out of town are pretty sparse.


Thinking we should also meet with a few job agencies and maybe a relocation specialist to get a sense of the finer details. If anyone has suggestions, it would be greatly appreciated.


Thanks much,
A
Coming from Portland, with no children...I would suggest living in downtown Wilmington to start. Lots of apartments going up and you may decide you really like the downtown lifestyle...with theaters, restaurants, riverwalk, etc...right at the door. I would also suggest you stay downtown when you come, Embassy Suites is brand new and check out the scene. Take a carriage ride through the Historic district. You'll notice that Wilmington is developing daily.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-16-2020, 03:43 PM
 
Location: Richmond Virginia
96 posts, read 55,869 times
Reputation: 89
My wife and I have been here about 4 years now. We started a business that has done fairly well with more work than we can handle, which is a great problem to have. Last month we decided to sell, and this month will be relocating back down to Charleston. We've been honest with ourselves and realized that Wilmington was more of a stepping stone than a place to establish roots, especially with a little one on the way. We've realized that we prefer a larger, more established and fine-tuned metropolitan area near us where the cost of living more closely matches the standard of living.

Wilmington seems to be trying to figure a lot out and is focused on bringing people in left and right, but not equally focused on how to keep them here. From what I have read, they're working on that. As for hurricanes, I've been through my fair share of CAT4+. From what I have noticed, the Monkey Junction area handles really well compared to others. Keep in mind hurricanes and coastlines go hand in hand just like tornadoes and the central U.S.

Something that bothers me is the road system. There are only a few roads going through and around with plenty of cars to fill them up almost all day. People behind the wheel at rush hour can get, as you said "rude", and that's when the crazy comes out.

To get more direct answers to all your questions, be a little more specific with what you have in mind.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-17-2020, 08:58 PM
 
2 posts, read 1,860 times
Reputation: 10
Thank you all for the responses and links to additional reading.



To address the questions: We are in our mid 40s with not kids (or plans for any), so not looking for kid-friendly places or good schools (although this could be a good indicator of the surrounding area). We do have two larger breed, somewhat energetic dogs (Lab and mini Aussie). For housing, we are looking to settle in a suburban neighborhood that is close to shopping and entertainment but not right in the middle of it. We tend to be homebodies. Ideally, we would like a single family home or duplex. Looking at a housing budget of 200-300k. We will probably rent at first though. We prefer a quieter area with the ability to drive to something if we want. Currently we are about a 10 minute drive from Downtown Portland, which is perfect. We do drive, so no need to be near mass transit. Also not necessarily looking to live on or near the beach or a golf course. Regarding traffic, we are no strangers to congestion. Portland can be difficult to get around too. The city is divided in half by the Willamette River and although we have several bridges, traffic can get bad. Plus population has grown here too and this hasn't helped the traffic situation.



We don't need lots of shops or variety. But it would be nice to have the basic amenities within a 20 minute commute. For us the basics are a large grocery store, pet store, gas stations, department-type store like Target/Walmart, doctors, dentist. Also would like jobs that are close to home as well - within a 30 minute commute.


We do like the idea of less "big brother" type politics. Portland is becoming a bit too liberal for our comfort level and more conservative would be a welcome change.



How much damage do hurricanes typically cause in the Wilmington area? How often do they come near the area? Sandy aside, we have gotten some bad tropical storms on LI resulting from hurricanes. Strong winds, some downed trees and power outages were the main effects we saw.



What neighborhoods see the most crime? What types of crime are prevalent in these areas?



Regarding taxes - do you feel that the government gouges you with taxes? We do not have sales tax in Oregon, but property taxes keep going up. Lots of people rent in Portland and since they assume property taxes don't affect them, they continuously vote "yes" to raising property taxes to pay for every little thing. (Then they wonder why their rent goes up and complain about the high cost of living here.). It is expensive to live here, but we are still living fairly comfortably. One of the draws for us for Wilmington is the cheaper cost of living. We do understand that that probably also means less income than we make now. We are researching that to make sure we won't end up putting ourselves in a bad position. I have been looking at job ads to get a sense of pay and we plan to meet with a few recruitment agencies on our trip out there.



Lots of information and questions, I know! I do thank you for any insight, comments, suggestions, or recommendations you can share.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-17-2020, 09:18 PM
 
2,064 posts, read 1,054,024 times
Reputation: 2105
It would be difficult to live in Wilmington and not be within 20 minutes of most shopping. I would say the government doesn't gouge you with taxes.

Here is some good information on hurricanes, but remember they are random and unpredictable. The most common problem with them is flooding, pwoer outages and trees falling down.

Wilmington,North Carolina hurricanes

The median house price in Wilmington is $230,000, so your budget is should be ok, but won't get you a mansion. Look at the area east of College Road, south of Oleander Drive and north of Piner Road.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-17-2020, 10:48 PM
 
569 posts, read 225,916 times
Reputation: 308
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nycoor View Post
Thank you all for the responses and links to additional reading.



To address the questions: We are in our mid 40s with not kids (or plans for any), so not looking for kid-friendly places or good schools (although this could be a good indicator of the surrounding area). We do have two larger breed, somewhat energetic dogs (Lab and mini Aussie). For housing, we are looking to settle in a suburban neighborhood that is close to shopping and entertainment but not right in the middle of it. We tend to be homebodies. Ideally, we would like a single family home or duplex. Looking at a housing budget of 200-300k. We will probably rent at first though. We prefer a quieter area with the ability to drive to something if we want. Currently we are about a 10 minute drive from Downtown Portland, which is perfect. We do drive, so no need to be near mass transit. Also not necessarily looking to live on or near the beach or a golf course. Regarding traffic, we are no strangers to congestion. Portland can be difficult to get around too. The city is divided in half by the Willamette River and although we have several bridges, traffic can get bad. Plus population has grown here too and this hasn't helped the traffic situation.



We don't need lots of shops or variety. But it would be nice to have the basic amenities within a 20 minute commute. For us the basics are a large grocery store, pet store, gas stations, department-type store like Target/Walmart, doctors, dentist. Also would like jobs that are close to home as well - within a 30 minute commute.


We do like the idea of less "big brother" type politics. Portland is becoming a bit too liberal for our comfort level and more conservative would be a welcome change.



How much damage do hurricanes typically cause in the Wilmington area? How often do they come near the area? Sandy aside, we have gotten some bad tropical storms on LI resulting from hurricanes. Strong winds, some downed trees and power outages were the main effects we saw.



What neighborhoods see the most crime? What types of crime are prevalent in these areas?



Regarding taxes - do you feel that the government gouges you with taxes? We do not have sales tax in Oregon, but property taxes keep going up. Lots of people rent in Portland and since they assume property taxes don't affect them, they continuously vote "yes" to raising property taxes to pay for every little thing. (Then they wonder why their rent goes up and complain about the high cost of living here.). It is expensive to live here, but we are still living fairly comfortably. One of the draws for us for Wilmington is the cheaper cost of living. We do understand that that probably also means less income than we make now. We are researching that to make sure we won't end up putting ourselves in a bad position. I have been looking at job ads to get a sense of pay and we plan to meet with a few recruitment agencies on our trip out there.



Lots of information and questions, I know! I do thank you for any insight, comments, suggestions, or recommendations you can share.

Honestly, coming from Portland to Wilmington, you will experience a lot of culture shock. Wilmington is a beautiful laid back historical southern coastal city, but very conservative and small "townish" in a way. On the other hand, as the other poster mentioned, Charleston is a much more urban metropolitan city with a bit of international sophistication, with a thriving culture and culinary scene.

At the end of the day, it all depends on what you are looking for and what you makes you happy. You may want to check out both before making a decision.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-18-2020, 08:07 AM
 
Location: Sneads Ferry, NC
11,919 posts, read 21,898,104 times
Reputation: 5625
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nycoor View Post
How much damage do hurricanes typically cause in the Wilmington area? How often do they come near the area? .......
Regarding taxes - do you feel that the government gouges you with taxes?
As said, hurricane occurrence is random. However, you could probably see a hurricane hit somewhere on the North Carolina coast every two years. Typically you would find tree branches knocked off if you missed a direct hit.

The last hurrricane left parts of Wilmington without power for a week. Some parts were cut off by flooded streets. But that was a hundred-year flood. It is a good idea to plan to have a generator and emergency supplies.

Regarding taxes-- No, I do not feel gouged. Property taxes are in the mid-range for states, and I feel there is a decent balance of service and cost. Property is re-assessed every three years. I am more concerned about hurricane insurance. Ours has gone up by 10% every year for the past three years. We now pay more for homeowner insurance than we do for property tax.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-18-2020, 09:52 AM
 
569 posts, read 225,916 times
Reputation: 308
Quote:
Originally Posted by goldenage1 View Post
As said, hurricane occurrence is random. However, you could probably see a hurricane hit somewhere on the North Carolina coast every two years. Typically you would find tree branches knocked off if you missed a direct hit.

The last hurrricane left parts of Wilmington without power for a week. Some parts were cut off by flooded streets. But that was a hundred-year flood. It is a good idea to plan to have a generator and emergency supplies.

Regarding taxes-- No, I do not feel gouged. Property taxes are in the mid-range for states, and I feel there is a decent balance of service and cost. Property is re-assessed every three years. I am more concerned about hurricane insurance. Ours has gone up by 10% every year for the past three years. We now pay more for homeowner insurance than we do for property tax.

These so called 100 year flooding events are becoming much more common and frequent on most parts of the southeast coast due to global warming. Rising sea levels and sunny day flooding are major long term threats. This is not unique Wilmington, of course; cities like Charleston SC are experiencing serious flooding problems which over time could threaten the structures in the historical districts. Miami is considered to be particularly vulnerable to rising sea levels and associated flooding. The NC coast has made zero preparations for global warming issues and I don't think any other southeast state has done so either.

I have a cousin that lived on the NJ shore for years. After Hurricane Sandy, he packed up and moved to another town 30 miles inland.

These are things that you may want to consider before you move from the west coast to the southeast coast. The big wild card here IMO is the unknown frequency and intensity of future storms (hurricanes or tropical storms).
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:



Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > North Carolina > Coastal North Carolina

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top