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Old 03-22-2011, 06:07 PM
 
Location: NY
343 posts, read 1,310,072 times
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I want to take 1 or 2 under-grad level or graduate level courses for Accounting/Finance/database systems/Economics.
What courses would you guys suggest? And should a grad level course be better,I have completed my under grad degree 6 years back but I'm looking to start grad school now. Many of the programs that I'm interested need accounting/fin/systems etc so I thought I should just go ahead and take one class this summer;may even help my grad school application isnt it ?

I'm kind of worried if I"ll be too old in an under grad class,if I choose to go to one.
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Old 03-25-2011, 12:19 PM
 
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Depending upon your other qualifications for the graduate program you're interested in, they may simply assign the finance/accounting courses to you as a conditional acceptance, or as "pre-reqs" that you would have to take before you could start the majority of your class material.

If you're looking at a specific degree program - I would look to see exactly what classes they are requiring. It will do you no good to take "history of accounting" if what they are looking for is a fundamental knowledge of accouting that is really ACC I and ACC II.

Same with economics. The first class you take is generally Macro, followed by Micro. Then you go off into the specializations....

I'd talk with a counselor (admissions counselor) from the school you're interested in and find out what they think would be helpful.

I'm all for taking classes just to better yourself -- but it would be irritating for you to take the "wrong" fin/acct/econ classes and find out you didn't improve your chances of being accepted and you didn't actually complete any of their pre-reqs.

good luck on the grad school application!
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Old 03-29-2011, 01:53 PM
 
Location: NY
343 posts, read 1,310,072 times
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Briolet - good reply. thank you

I was wondering if taking up courses at a community college will be useful? I could use this against my pre requisites and get credits at a cheaper rate of tuition??
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Old 03-29-2011, 05:13 PM
 
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Please. I started grad school 12 years after finishing my undergrad. And 80% of my classmates are my age and older. So you're definitely not to old.

I agree, you need to talk to an admissions counselor and discuss their curriculum. Programs vary widely from one school to the next.

Community colleges do offer credits for less $$, but if you need to take any undergrad courses before starting grad school, they are likely at a higher level than what a community college would offer.
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Old 03-29-2011, 06:15 PM
 
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Re: Comm/Coll --- it really depends on what type of grad program you're taking. I am finishing up an MBA from a mid-tier business school. Because I was not a business major in undergrad (was a science major) - I had to take an extra 26 credits of "pre-reqs" of business classes before I could actually start the "core" curriculum. These were at the 500 level. I doubt that community college courses would have counted for any of them - even though they were basically high-level "Intro to" classes (Intro to Acct, Econ, Fin, Business Systems, etc..)

I'd really start narrowing down what program you are interested in and what schools. Then contact them - call and talk to an admissions counselor for the GRADUATE school. They may suggest you talk directly to the college/department that your degree falls under.

Don't worry about the fact that you may not be ready to apply RIGHT now. Its not weird to call 6 months to a year or two before you're ready to apply. They are used to it -- esp. with so many "non-traditional" students going to grad school while they work full time.

This is what their full time job is - so really - they are the best source of info.

Don't worry about being "older" either -- I started my MBA in my mid 30's. Most of the people in my classes range from late 20's (the kids) to mid 50's. Their are a few people who *just* finished their business undergrad and went directly to grad school, but honestly that's a minority. Most of us work full time and go to grad school in our "spare" time.

Granted - MBAs in general are set up for that more than some traditional heavily theoretical grad programs. For instance you're probably not going to find commuter students with full time jobs going to get their PhD in Quantum Mechanics.

But for programs (like MBAs) - its not uncommon. And I'm not going to Phoenix or DeVry -- its a traditional midwestern public main campus university. They just recognize that a lot of students have other commitments and so make classes available on evenings/weekends.

Good luck to you!!
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Old 03-30-2011, 02:54 PM
 
1,624 posts, read 4,852,863 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Briolat21 View Post
Re: Comm/Coll --- it really depends on what type of grad program you're taking. I am finishing up an MBA from a mid-tier business school. Because I was not a business major in undergrad (was a science major) - I had to take an extra 26 credits of "pre-reqs" of business classes before I could actually start the "core" curriculum. These were at the 500 level. I doubt that community college courses would have counted for any of them - even though they were basically high-level "Intro to" classes (Intro to Acct, Econ, Fin, Business Systems, etc..)
That sucks. When I looked into some MBAs before, it seemed like most of them didn't have these pre-reqs., but required non business people to do sort of a summer bootcamp where they went over the basics in seminar style classes. Those classes weren't meant to be comprehensive, but were designed to get students to able to know enough to get started in the core MBA curriculum. Some programs also offered self study programs as an alternative.
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Old 03-31-2011, 10:21 AM
 
3,763 posts, read 12,490,188 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slim04 View Post
That sucks. When I looked into some MBAs before, it seemed like most of them didn't have these pre-reqs., but required non business people to do sort of a summer bootcamp where they went over the basics in seminar style classes. Those classes weren't meant to be comprehensive, but were designed to get students to able to know enough to get started in the core MBA curriculum. Some programs also offered self study programs as an alternative.

Well - I don't know that I'd put it that strongly. But - it obviously meant it added about 2+ years on to what should have been a 2 year degree. And - those 500 level courses aren't free... so added several thousand dollars to the total cost.

But at the time I started - I worked at a place where a lot of us were following this path - and most of them were not business undergrads either - so it was just kinda normal.

And since you were admitted into the degree program right away - and the company did some tuition reimbursement - that helped. So the money thing wasn't as bad as it could have been.

The time thing though - that is kind of annoying. But - c'est la vie.

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