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Old 11-22-2011, 05:05 PM
 
24,488 posts, read 40,994,789 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rock_chalk View Post
Think about how you define the term "masters degree" and the answer should be clear.
Please clarify.
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Old 11-22-2011, 05:16 PM
 
Location: MO->MI->CA->TX->MA
7,021 posts, read 14,412,205 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJBest View Post
There's value to the piece of paper. I would wager that most people with good degrees from good schools do not apply the material they learned.
Including me.. you learn a lot of 'fundamental' but important skills in problem solving, critical thinking, etc. when pursuing a degree at a good school that are transferable to most jobs.

I'm thinking more along the lines of people today who went through the "system" like robots, going to a top school thinking it's a ticket to a well paying job but ended up working in fast food or retail. Not all graduates from the top schools are that way but it's still sad to think there are some (yeah the economy's a mess.) If they had the ability to graduate from, say, an ivy league school, some out of the box thinking should take them a long way..

Quote:
Originally Posted by ragnarkar View Post
People with the creativity and the ability to take risk willing to start innovative new businesses.

What good is a top school's MBA and advanced degree if you can't put it to use?
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Old 11-22-2011, 05:26 PM
 
24,488 posts, read 40,994,789 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ragnarkar View Post
Including me.. you learn a lot of 'fundamental' but important skills in problem solving, critical thinking, etc. when pursuing a degree at a good school that are transferable to most jobs.

I'm thinking more along the lines of people today who went through the "system" like robots, going to a top school thinking it's a ticket to a well paying job but ended up working in fast food or retail. Not all graduates from the top schools are that way but it's still sad to think there are some (yeah the economy's a mess.) If they had the ability to graduate from, say, an ivy league school, some out of the box thinking should take them a long way..
I see... I didn't consider that people could make it through good schools without learning the material.

I assumed that those who are in it for the paper, still had to learn the material in order to get the paper.
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Old 11-22-2011, 05:43 PM
 
Location: Midwest
504 posts, read 1,266,248 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJBest View Post
Please clarify.
If you exactly describe a "masters degree" as this term exists today, you won't be surprised that people with this credential could be unemployed.
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Old 11-22-2011, 05:52 PM
 
24,488 posts, read 40,994,789 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rock_chalk View Post
If you exactly describe a "masters degree" as this term exists today, you won't be surprised that people with this credential could be unemployed.
Fair enough. There is a fundamental problem with higher education.
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Old 11-22-2011, 10:43 PM
 
127 posts, read 199,789 times
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Thanks for all the observations, but I think we've strayed from the main question here In a world where *everyone* goes to grad/MBA/law/MD, who are the few people that manage to "get ahead", and what have they done that make them different from the millions of others who attended/graduated from the top-notch schools and interned at the most prestigious places?
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Old 11-22-2011, 10:45 PM
 
Location: Out in the Badlands
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Those that drop out like messers Jobs and Gates.
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Old 11-22-2011, 10:56 PM
 
18,837 posts, read 37,213,800 times
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It is called "motivation". I did not have wealthy parents who could loan me money to buy a house. I have a friend, he has worked the same job for 20 years. He was comfortable. His parents help him out, he gets by, has a nice house. I have moved several times, to get ahead, and earn more money. I often wonder, if I had rich parents would I have worked this hard?! Moved as much? No. I got ahead by moving any where for the best job
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Old 11-22-2011, 11:02 PM
 
127 posts, read 199,789 times
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Motivation? I'm saying that we should assume, for the most part, that if someone is at a top-notch grad school/MBA/med/law, then they've already demonstrated "motivation", or at least the potential to compete on par with those who are motivated.
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Old 11-22-2011, 11:11 PM
hsw
 
2,144 posts, read 7,135,612 times
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Would argue the inverse

Many/most of today's highest-earning <40yo guys are CS undergrads from Stanford/Berk/IL/CMU or college dropouts and earned their greatest "alumni" cred not at any college but rather at some place like GOOG in its early days before its smartest engineers had retired

And some of older ~35yo stars were Wharton finance undergrads who had started at Goldman (where most early training for financiers happened) before moving on to more lucrative hedge funds (in ancient era when hedge funds paid more than leading-edge software cos.)

Era of MBA or MS/PhD in CS, etc ended back in early '90s for any smart kids...arguably tech/Net&self-learning has made entire concept of formal college education (let alone grad school) quite the costly Luddite miseducation path...hell, SV is dominated by college dropouts who are now >65yo (like Ellison), as well as <30yo dropouts, like the fb clowns...as well as numerous billionaire dropouts from Stanford's CS PhD pgm like ~55yo Bechtolsheim and the <40yo GOOG co-founders...
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