Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education > Colleges and Universities
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-11-2014, 12:38 PM
 
Location: London
12,275 posts, read 7,156,171 times
Reputation: 13661

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by thatguydownsouth View Post
Accounting involves NO hard math, its all about rules and regulations. Its more in line with law than with any other field. I love getting the "oh you must be good at math" line from people when I tell them what I do. No. Let me explain: Your business purchases a generator for $100k with an estimated salvage value of 10k. The asset has a useful life of 5 years. How much depreciation expense do you record monthly? (100k-10k)/5/12=$1500/month. That's it, its 4th grade math. The COMPLEX part is the fact that that's one of the several different methods of depreciation and knowing that you use this method for your financial statements but use a completely different method for tax purposes, and that this is one of the kagillion things that you need to know in order to pass the CPA exam. Its all about knowing the rules of financial reporting, and contract law, and personal tax, and corporate tax, and not for profit tax, and on and on and on. It really is a special subset of law.

And that doesn't even touch on the comprehension of the flow of information between financial statements, like how one transaction flows from the income statement through the balance sheet.
stop, stop! !!! You're triggering my ptsd
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-11-2014, 12:43 PM
 
Location: USA
7,776 posts, read 12,458,776 times
Reputation: 11817
I took Accounting I and II at a community college when I needed credits to keep my teaching license updated and made A's in both. They weren't difficult but very tiring in some areas. I remember once spending hours on a workbook problem trying to find a 2 cent mistake. In real life, I would put 2 cents in the pot and forget it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-11-2014, 01:24 PM
 
6,129 posts, read 6,821,266 times
Reputation: 10821
Quote:
Originally Posted by jotucker99 View Post
"Hard" is subjective, for example a "fit" guy could run a mile easily while a person out of shape would find running that mile extremely difficult. I think that we should step back and look at this from a general perspective in terms of "the average person".

The average person can get through majoring in Psychology, Communications, English, History, or another liberal arts study because there's very little if any math and science involved. There's no complicated ratios, calculations, etc. Most of it is easy "theory," routine memorization or simple regurgitation. In other words, "the answer" is already there and it's easy to pinpoint based on just reading chapters, memorizing what you read and regurgitating.

However, the average person will have difficulty getting through Accounting, Engineering, Chemistry, Biology, and other Stem related areas. The reason being is that it's not just simple theory or regurgitation, it's very complicated concepts, calculations, deductive reasoning, as well as old theories that build upon new theories that build upon prospective theories coming up down the line. The "answer" isn't so CUT AND DRY to arrive at, sometimes the "answer" can be a multitude of options and the person has to have not just the skill, but the discipline and IQ to comprehend the area to deductively and critically arrive to the proper answer. The average person can't do this, however, that doesn't mean that someone that is skilled in Math would find Accounting "hard" per say. But understand, someone that is skilled in Math isn't AVERAGE by any sort.

LOL.

I would be more inclined to believe this if I didn't have to deal with so many engineering/science types that can't write a decent essay or comprehend "easy" abstract theories.

Also, psychology also involves a lot of stats, especially as you get deeper into the major. There is math involved with that major even though it's doesn't seem like it to the layman... it's similar to marketing in that respect.

I do think whether a major is "hard' just depends of what each individual's strengths are.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-11-2014, 01:26 PM
 
1,054 posts, read 1,430,876 times
Reputation: 2442
As a CPA, I can say that most people consider accounting hard because they don't get it. The concepts are difficult to grasp if you don't have the kind of brain that "gets accounting". I have the right kind of brain for accounting so it wasn't too difficult for me in college, but wasn't all that easy either. It's a much harder major than general business, marketing, or most liberal arts majors but not as hard as physics, math, chemistry or engineering. The beginning and intermediate accounting classes are definitely designed to weed out people who don't have the aptitude for accounting, but I wouldn't say they're that much harder than the upper level classes.

One misconception with accounting - you don't really have to be that great at math. I hate math and am not great with anything more than basic math and I had no trouble with accounting classes or passing the CPA exam. In school and on the job we have software and calculators to take care of the math. High level accounting is all about the reading and memorization of big amounts of complex information, and then be able to correctly process this incoming information and turn it into the correct output. You have to have very strong reading comprehension skills or you will struggle with accounting classes and especially with the CPA exam. To successfully become a CPA you have to have well above average intelligence as well as the right type of brain; this is a pretty small percentage of the population that possess these qualities.

I shake my head about hearing of people going into accounting just because they think it's a cushy office job. They will hate every day of their life as long as they have an accounting job if they don't have a brain that "gets and actually enjoys accounting". The day to day work in accounting I mostly enjoy, but for someone who does not enjoy accounting I doubt there are too many more miserable jobs available.

If you are looking for an easy cushy office job, accounting is not for you; not unless you want to just do bookkeeping and/or payroll which doesn't pay all that much better than a receptionist position. High level accounting/CPA jobs have deadlines, sometimes crappy hours and can be very stressful at times.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-11-2014, 05:25 PM
 
Location: Clinton Township, MI
1,901 posts, read 1,832,831 times
Reputation: 2329
Quote:
Tinawina

LOL.

I would be more inclined to believe this if I didn't have to deal with so many engineering/science types that can't write a decent essay or comprehend "easy" abstract theories.

Also, psychology also involves a lot of stats, especially as you get deeper into the major. There is math involved with that major even though it's doesn't seem like it to the layman... it's similar to marketing in that respect.

I do think whether a major is "hard' just depends of what each individual's strengths are.
What do you mean you run across STEM folks that can't write a decent essay or comprehend easy theories? Can you elaborate? I don't see how an Engineering guy can't structure a sentence properly, formulate a decent essay nor understand "easy theories," when he has demonstrated the ability to do much HARDER tasks.

The issue with Psychology and even Marketing for that matter (in terms of degree programs), is that they are both routine memorization and simple regurgitation. To be honest with you, the majority of the Business degrees offered today should be placed in a category very similar to the liberal arts degree.

What it comes down to, is the answer already there? Has the answer already been provided to you? And if it has, all you have to do is "study" which is memorize the answer and spit it back out. If your degree program is structured like this, I believe it's of low quality UNLESS you are going to go all the way to the PhD level and teach this stuff back to other college students.

If your degree program, to quote myself from earlier, "Has very complicated concepts, calculations, deductive reasoning, as well as old theories that build upon new theories that build upon prospective theories coming up down the line....the answer isn't so CUT AND DRY to arrive at, sometimes the answer can be a multitude of options and the person has to have not just the skill, but the discipline and IQ to comprehend the area to deductively and critically arrive to the proper answer.".......then I would say your degree program is a "hard" program.

One of the things I hate and I think someone touched on this earlier, is that with the news being out that liberal arts and regurgitation degree programs being of low quality today, they are pushing students to go into STEM, go into STEM, go into STEM! Okay, but what if those students lack the ability to handle a STEM?

This is why I think about 70% of the people IN college right now have no business being there. They are only there to grab ANY 4 year college degree to slap on a resume and say, "I'm educated, hire me!". Most of these 70%'ers will be in the liberal arts and regurgitation degree programs. The other 30% are in the harder subjects, and if you are in those subjects then going to college makes sense as it does require research, study, examinations, etc.

A big part of the college BUBBLE is requiring all of these students to just "go to college and grab anything" instead of focusing on building up an efficient career outside of the college degree system which for MOST students...the college degree has NOTHING to do with what they end up doing in their career anyway.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-12-2014, 12:23 PM
 
1,761 posts, read 2,608,960 times
Reputation: 1569
jotucker99- you certainly hit the nail on the head, that is the big issue with college grads and finding work. Another thing is many are graduating or have graduated with the belief that "even though I don't have the exact degree X company is looking for, I still have a good shot at getting hired because the employer will be willing to train"- only to graduate and realize that is not really the case. Yes maybe your uncle, your cousin, some older family member was able to achieve such a thing in the past, but today with entry level being more like "must have 2-3 years previous experience in A and highly prefer graduates with a degree in B" , it most likely won't happen today.

Also perhaps there should be a push or at least some sort of information on paths outside of going to college. Certainly when I was in highschool the message largely was "Hey if you don't want to end up working the register at Burger King or Target for the rest of your life then you better go to college!" .
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-12-2014, 01:27 PM
 
Location: Clinton Township, MI
1,901 posts, read 1,832,831 times
Reputation: 2329
dazeddude,

Correct, and the irony is that a lot of college graduates ENDED UP working back at Burger King or Target or waiting tables anyway.

The main issue is a lack of Career Planning. A college degree is just one tool in a toolbox of TOOLS that are at your disposal, that you have available to utilize to construct a Career. But I don't believe EVERYBODY should be utilizing the "college degree tool". As I mentioned, I believe that over 50% of the people in college right now have no business being there. It's why there's a bubble, it's why the cost is through the roof, and it's why the education quality has gone down as they have to dumb down the education to keep their grad rates efficient or they could lose Title IV and other benefits.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-13-2014, 01:44 PM
 
4,059 posts, read 5,628,003 times
Reputation: 2892
Quote:
Originally Posted by jotucker99 View Post
dazeddude,

It's why there's a bubble, it's why the cost is through the roof, .
Supply/demand is more complex than that when it comes to tuition. Enrollments have actually been declining the past few years, but that hasn't translated to sub-inflation tuition increases.

Ironically downward enrollment pressures can and do actually push tuition up - colleges that are struggling or nervous look to add new programs, new amenities, and otherwise spend on new shinies to compete against their peer schools for enrollments.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-02-2015, 04:59 AM
 
Location: Philippines
1 posts, read 3,185 times
Reputation: 10
Hi I'm Newbies here And this coming school year I will go in college taking BSAccounting and i dont have any idea how hard is it HAHAHAHA I hope That you can give me some idea, so that i can prepare my self.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-02-2015, 11:57 AM
 
24,488 posts, read 41,181,679 times
Reputation: 12921
Quote:
Originally Posted by jotucker99 View Post
dazeddude,

Correct, and the irony is that a lot of college graduates ENDED UP working back at Burger King or Target or waiting tables anyway.

The main issue is a lack of Career Planning. A college degree is just one tool in a toolbox of TOOLS that are at your disposal, that you have available to utilize to construct a Career. But I don't believe EVERYBODY should be utilizing the "college degree tool". As I mentioned, I believe that over 50% of the people in college right now have no business being there. It's why there's a bubble, it's why the cost is through the roof, and it's why the education quality has gone down as they have to dumb down the education to keep their grad rates efficient or they could lose Title IV and other benefits.
The cost hasn't yet gone through the roof. It's still lower than historical norms when compared to median income.

The quality of education across all the universities that exist today has gone down. But if you focus on the good universities, it's still high quality.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education > Colleges and Universities
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top