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Old 06-18-2019, 10:10 AM
 
14,400 posts, read 14,303,039 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jotucker99 View Post
What do you mean you run across STEM folks that can't write a decent essay or comprehend easy theories? Can you elaborate? I don't see how an Engineering guy can't structure a sentence properly, formulate a decent essay nor understand "easy theories," when he has demonstrated the ability to do much HARDER tasks.

The issue with Psychology and even Marketing for that matter (in terms of degree programs), is that they are both routine memorization and simple regurgitation. To be honest with you, the majority of the Business degrees offered today should be placed in a category very similar to the liberal arts degree.

What it comes down to, is the answer already there? Has the answer already been provided to you? And if it has, all you have to do is "study" which is memorize the answer and spit it back out. If your degree program is structured like this, I believe it's of low quality UNLESS you are going to go all the way to the PhD level and teach this stuff back to other college students.

If your degree program, to quote myself from earlier, "Has very complicated concepts, calculations, deductive reasoning, as well as old theories that build upon new theories that build upon prospective theories coming up down the line....the answer isn't so CUT AND DRY to arrive at, sometimes the answer can be a multitude of options and the person has to have not just the skill, but the discipline and IQ to comprehend the area to deductively and critically arrive to the proper answer.".......then I would say your degree program is a "hard" program.

One of the things I hate and I think someone touched on this earlier, is that with the news being out that liberal arts and regurgitation degree programs being of low quality today, they are pushing students to go into STEM, go into STEM, go into STEM! Okay, but what if those students lack the ability to handle a STEM?

This is why I think about 70% of the people IN college right now have no business being there. They are only there to grab ANY 4 year college degree to slap on a resume and say, "I'm educated, hire me!". Most of these 70%'ers will be in the liberal arts and regurgitation degree programs. The other 30% are in the harder subjects, and if you are in those subjects then going to college makes sense as it does require research, study, examinations, etc.

A big part of the college BUBBLE is requiring all of these students to just "go to college and grab anything" instead of focusing on building up an efficient career outside of the college degree system which for MOST students...the college degree has NOTHING to do with what they end up doing in their career anyway.


Writing is a talent and the reality is that many people do not have it. I see plenty of examples of it here on CDF among adults. I see it in the professional world as an attorney.

There is always a need to look at people as individuals and some multi-talented persons truly can do it all. They can do advanced mathematics, understand physics, and still write a very good essay. However, there are not--in my observation--a whole lot of people that are multi-talented. With most people, talents predominate in certain areas. I have a b-i-l who is a very gifted surgeon. However, he cannot write worth beans and I've seen plenty of examples of it. Worse, he has very poor social skills. I will give him credit for realizing it. He allows his office staff and wife to do most of his communicating for him.

Because talents tend to be predominate in certain areas it is more common to find someone who is strong in STEM, but mediocre or average when it comes to writing and communication. It is also common to find many people in my area--law--who are very poor mathematicians.

There are students who don't belong in college, but it isn't anywhere near 70% of the total there currently. Maybe you ought to share with me exactly what your own experience with college was? Do you hold undergraduate or graduate degrees?

Finally, what leads you to conclude that most people who obtained a college degree work in a field that is not connected in any way with the degree they earned? Do you have an article or some statistics to cite?

Hint: I think we have just been bombarded with a lot of hot air.
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Old 06-18-2019, 10:18 AM
 
Location: Squirrel Tree
1,199 posts, read 724,794 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markg91359 View Post
[/b]

Writing is a talent and the reality is that many people do not have it. I see plenty of examples of it here on CDF among adults. I see it in the professional world as an attorney.

There is always a need to look at people as individuals and some multi-talented persons truly can do it all. They can do advanced mathematics, understand physics, and still write a very good essay. However, there are not--in my observation--a whole lot of people that are multi-talented. With most people, talents predominate in certain areas. I have a b-i-l who is a very gifted surgeon. However, he cannot write worth beans and I've seen plenty of examples of it. Worse, he has very poor social skills. I will give him credit for realizing it. He allows his office staff and wife to do most of his communicating for him.

Because talents tend to be predominate in certain areas it is more common to find someone who is strong in STEM, but mediocre or average when it comes to writing and communication. It is also common to find many people in my area--law--who are very poor mathematicians.

There are students who don't belong in college, but it isn't anywhere near 70% of the total there currently. Maybe you ought to share with me exactly what your own experience with college was? Do you hold undergraduate or graduate degrees?

Finally, what leads you to conclude that most people who obtained a college degree work in a field that is not connected in any way with the degree they earned? Do you have an article or some statistics to cite?

Hint: I think we have just been bombarded with a lot of hot air.
WTF? Accounting is not a STEM major and it traditionally wasn't even a university major.
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Old 06-18-2019, 10:23 AM
 
Location: Middle America
37,409 posts, read 53,569,981 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fatsquirrel View Post
Accounting is similar to law. It has no math. You look at a chart to find the time value of money numbers to value a bond.
Accounting "has math." It's basic arithmetical concepts, versus being proficient in advanced trigonometry, algebraic, and calculus concepts, but, yes, it does involve math.
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Old 06-18-2019, 10:31 AM
 
Location: Middle America
37,409 posts, read 53,569,981 times
Reputation: 53073
Quote:
Originally Posted by markg91359 View Post
[/b]

Writing is a talent and the reality is that many people do not have it. I see plenty of examples of it here on CDF among adults. I see it in the professional world as an attorney.


Yep. And it can be marketed as a significant asset, if it is a skill set one possesses.

I've always been able to get snapped up in a heartbeat for anything that required a writing sample for consideration. In my current position, writing detailed, cogent case notes that will hold up under legal and ethical scrutiny is a requirement, and probably represents how about a full quarter of my time is spent.
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Old 06-18-2019, 10:32 AM
 
18,069 posts, read 18,815,515 times
Reputation: 25191
Quote:
Originally Posted by fatsquirrel View Post
I never saw algebra, trigonometry or calculus in a P&L Sheet.
Do you know what "math" is? Because it seems you do not.

And yes, it does have algebra, lol.
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Old 06-18-2019, 10:34 AM
 
Location: Squirrel Tree
1,199 posts, read 724,794 times
Reputation: 516
Quote:
Originally Posted by boxus View Post
Do you know what "math" is? Because it seems you do not.

And yes, it does have algebra, lol.
The squeeze and plug parts of a tea account is not really algebra.
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Old 06-18-2019, 10:41 AM
 
10,501 posts, read 7,034,778 times
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It's like anything else. If you have an aptitude for it, then you do well at it. If you don't have an aptitude for it, you crash and burn.



My wife has a CPA and is now the CFO of a sizable company. She described her accounting classes being as easy as breathing. Meanwhile, accounting to me is about as arcane as black magic. Then again, she can't do what I do.
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Old 06-18-2019, 10:53 AM
 
18,069 posts, read 18,815,515 times
Reputation: 25191
Quote:
Originally Posted by fatsquirrel View Post
The squeeze and plug parts of a tea account is not really algebra.
If you know what algebra is, and know accounting, then you know accounting has algebra.

But given you did not even know accounting has math, lol.
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Old 06-18-2019, 08:43 PM
 
Location: A coal patch in Pennsyltucky
10,379 posts, read 10,661,869 times
Reputation: 12705
Quote:
Originally Posted by fatsquirrel View Post
The squeeze and plug parts of a tea account is not really algebra.

"tea account"
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Old 06-19-2019, 08:25 AM
 
14,400 posts, read 14,303,039 times
Reputation: 45727
Quote:
Originally Posted by fatsquirrel View Post
WTF? Accounting is not a STEM major and it traditionally wasn't even a university major.
If you are making a point here, I don't get it.
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