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Old 03-26-2013, 08:02 AM
 
2 posts, read 10,803 times
Reputation: 10

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Hi.
Sorry for mistakes in this message - I'm not good in english, but I'm trying)
Now I live in Russia, and studying at university, 3-year student (I'm 22, and I have had very long period of professional orientation). I'm working in laboratory, and I love it
My fiance want's to move in California, he already have a job...
I didn't plan to move, it was Very Big News for me.
Now I don't know, what to do. I love my fiance, and i want to be with him.. I understand, how important this job for him. And I want to try something new...

I'm not sure I can transfer to CA's uni. So, I have to start Bachelor again..
Am I too old for starting again, and for science career? I don't want to be the oldest and the lowest in my future lab. (I will finish at 30)

And how can I get a scholarship? Is good evaluations enough for it?
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Old 03-26-2013, 08:20 AM
 
Location: Maryland not Murlin
8,274 posts, read 23,318,716 times
Reputation: 6335
No, it is not too late to become a scientist and you will not be the oldest in the lab. However, depending on what kind of science you study, most people in the U.S. will not consider you a scientist without an advanced degree.

Not sure how someone who is not an American citizen gets scholarships, but they do happen.
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Old 03-26-2013, 08:22 AM
 
3,126 posts, read 6,176,453 times
Reputation: 7085
1. 30 is older but not unreasonably old for completion of a Ph.D.

2. Teaching and research assistantships are readily available in the sciences and engineering. Typically they pay a livable stipend and tuition. Degreed students from Russia are fairly competitive as they typically have excellent mathematical and theoretical science background.

3. Scholarship support for an UNDERGRADUATE (B.S.) degree would be very difficult to obtain.

4. Best bet is to complete a first degree in Russia and then seek admission to grad school in the US.
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Old 03-26-2013, 08:33 AM
 
2 posts, read 10,803 times
Reputation: 10
rational,
1) for completion, not for beginning?.. I'm 22 now
4) I thought a lot about it.. And I'll think.
I'm afraid that i won't find MA in California. This thing with moving etc - mostly for together life with my fiance... ><

Last edited by Sasha90; 03-26-2013 at 08:44 AM..
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Old 03-26-2013, 09:23 AM
i7pXFLbhE3gq
 
n/a posts
30 isn't too late.

35 isn't too late either.

Virtually every grad student I know will be or was in their very late 20s to mid 30s when they finish(ed).
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Old 03-26-2013, 03:53 PM
 
Location: Arizona
3,668 posts, read 5,915,991 times
Reputation: 2278
The simple answer: NO

The more complicated answer: NO
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Old 03-27-2013, 12:52 PM
 
3,126 posts, read 6,176,453 times
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> 1) for completion, not for beginning?.. I'm 22 now

After the B.S. degree, the time required to get a Ph.D. is probably in the range 4-8 years, depending strongly on field and advisor. Engineering tends to be on the short end, pure science longer. There is a strong dependence on advisor within the same field.

Receiving a Ph.D. at 30 would be somewhat older than average for students who go directly to grad school. There might be some advantage in the greater maturity and life experience. Beginning professional employment at 30 allows plenty of time in the US to accumulate retirement funds. For women it may be difficult to combine with having children, as the first 5-10 years are critical (if an academic) and demanding.

OLDER students receiving Ph.D.s are not unknown, but they are uncommon because it usually means they were employed and have given up a good salary to go back to school.
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Old 03-27-2013, 02:12 PM
 
2,612 posts, read 5,058,221 times
Reputation: 3954
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sasha90 View Post
Hi.
Sorry for mistakes in this message - I'm not good in english, but I'm trying)
Now I live in Russia, and studying at university, 3-year student (I'm 22, and I have had very long period of professional orientation). I'm working in laboratory, and I love it
My fiance want's to move in California, he already have a job...
I didn't plan to move, it was Very Big News for me.
Now I don't know, what to do. I love my fiance, and i want to be with him.. I understand, how important this job for him. And I want to try something new...

I'm not sure I can transfer to CA's uni. So, I have to start Bachelor again..
Am I too old for starting again, and for science career? I don't want to be the oldest and the lowest in my future lab. (I will finish at 30)

And how can I get a scholarship? Is good evaluations enough for it?
You can almost certainly transfer a good number of your credits and should not have to start over completely. You will need to use an evaluation service to see what your education is equivalent to. You can find out about that on the website of the college you want to go to. However, you will probably need to take ESL classes before they will let you take regular classes, and will also need to take the TOEFL and maybe SAT or GRE. That is what will really add time to your degree. If you finish your Bachelor's degree in Russia first, that will really help and will save you a lot of money.

You will not likely get money for undergrad study. In fact, you will need to show that you have a lot of money (enough to pay for your whole program of study) before you will be able to get a student visa. However, there is more money available to international students for graduate study - like master's and PhD - (assitantships, grants, fellowships).
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Old 03-27-2013, 04:38 PM
 
Location: Michissippi
3,119 posts, read 7,462,365 times
Reputation: 2063
It isn't too late to become a perpetual postdoctoral researcher if you're good at it. However, don't count on actually becoming a science professor or on being able to land a science job outside of an academic research lab. It may make perfect sense for a foreigner to pursue a science PhD. in the U.S. depending on your situation.
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