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Old 04-21-2013, 05:46 AM
 
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If someone scores very high on the SAT does that mean that the are more likely to do well in college academically? (Taking High School grades out of the equation)

If so, why, if not why?
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Old 04-21-2013, 05:57 AM
 
Location: On the Chesapeake
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That's what the CollegeBoard claims.

Answer a couple questions:

Why do boys generally score higher on the SAT than girls but have lower college GPAs and higher dropout rates?

Does the answer to the above question support the premise of higher SAT scores reflect greater college success?

The problem with SAT scores is that the threshold score for admission has dropped over the last 30 or so years (CollegeBoard recentered the scores about 15 years ago because the average scores were dropping and making them look bad). A score that gains a kid admission today would have been sent to the reject pile in 1980.

I will say that kids with higher SAT scores are likely better prepared for college. The killer today is that many kids are poor readers.
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Old 04-21-2013, 07:28 AM
 
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The State University of New York (SUNY) system did a study on this issue and has found that higher SAT scores do in fact predict better college outcomes (higher graduation rates).

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/18/op...lins.html?_r=0
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Old 04-21-2013, 08:33 AM
 
Location: Maryland's 6th District.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Spock View Post
If someone scores very high on the SAT does that mean that the are more likely to do well in college academically? (Taking High School grades out of the equation)

If so, why, if not why?
No, I do not. Test prep has become big business and there are tons of books, courses, and Internet sites that teach how to take the SAT (i.e., how to spot the tricks and traps and logic College Board uses.). C students score high and some students pay to have someone else take the test or cheat in other ways. And some people just do not test well, in particular with standardized tests.
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Old 04-21-2013, 08:37 AM
 
Location: Maryland's 6th District.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Momma_bear View Post
The State University of New York (SUNY) system did a study on this issue and has found that higher SAT scores do in fact predict better college outcomes (higher graduation rates).

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/18/op...lins.html?_r=0
The problem with graduation rate is that it does not include students who transferred out, completed their degree elsewhere, perhaps even from a more rigorous university. I could be wrong, but I do not think graduation rate includes transfer students transferring into the university, either.
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Old 04-21-2013, 09:58 AM
 
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Originally Posted by K-Luv View Post
The problem with graduation rate is that it does not include students who transferred out, completed their degree elsewhere, perhaps even from a more rigorous university. I could be wrong, but I do not think graduation rate includes transfer students transferring into the university, either.
Within a large system like SUNY I would think that would not make much difference since so many people transfer within the SUNY system.
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Old 04-21-2013, 10:55 AM
 
Location: My beloved Bluegrass
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Think about it. If you have a higher score, providing some else didn't take the test for you, it means either you are smarter than the average student, or you are a better test taker than the average student, or both. Either of those things are skills that help you do well in college classes. If it was because you paid for and took a prep course if means your education is important enough for you to put extra effort and money if that is what is needed to succeed. Work ethic can make up to some degree if you aren't the person in the class with the highest IQ.
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Old 04-21-2013, 11:14 AM
 
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It depends. Motivation and work ethic are more important than a test score.

My goddaughter, who was B student in HS and barely made it into a state school w/her ACT score is an A/B student at her university. In GA, where I live, we have the Hope Scholarship, for secondary education. You are eligible as long as you maintain a B average. The Hope covers 80% of tuition and books. She knows she would not be able to attend school if she lost the Hope. She'll send me pics of herself studying on Sat. nights in the campus library! I am so proud of her.
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Old 04-21-2013, 11:25 AM
 
2,612 posts, read 5,588,188 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Spock View Post
If someone scores very high on the SAT does that mean that the are more likely to do well in college academically? (Taking High School grades out of the equation)

If so, why, if not why?
I am always confused when I see these kinds of questions here. Why ask people here what they believe when there is plenty of hard data out there showing the relationship between SAT's and academics? If you want real information, then google the studies and find out. What people believe is irrelevant.
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Old 04-21-2013, 11:54 AM
 
Location: On the Chesapeake
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The CollegeBoard makes no claim for graduation rates, all it claims is that a higher score translates to better 1st year success. That's it. Freshman year.

The reason why it's first year is that if a student successfully finishes it the likelihood he will graduate rises. I don't know how they define "success", they tend to be closemouthed about some things. It couldn't be because SAT/ACT/AP/IB, in my opinion, have degenerated into a racket designed to separate students and parents from more and more money.

As a note, I've taught high school for 30 years and have been my school's AP coordinator the last several (along with Middle States Coordinator, another racket) so I've been on the front lines, so to speak, of the SAT wars.
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