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Old 04-25-2013, 10:39 PM
 
Location: San Francisco, CA
15,087 posts, read 13,498,038 times
Reputation: 14266

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Based on almost a decade of professional experience, I can tell you that "business communication" consists primarily of ego-driven people clamoring over themselves to say obvious things, embellished with a hefty dose of predictable business jargon about "cross-collaborative", "paradigm", "cloud-driven", "buy-in", etc.

"We're still working toward buy-in for our new cross-collaborative, cloud-driven paradigm."

If you can say sht like this without a shame-filled impulse to punch yourself in the face, then you're going to be a great business communicator.
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Old 04-26-2013, 04:10 AM
 
Location: Richmond, VA
5,071 posts, read 6,388,275 times
Reputation: 7235
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Spock View Post
Lots of the students went to the dean and tried to get out of the class because they said they knew all about getting a jobs and communicating on the job. When asked how they told about getting a part time job at CVS.
I call shenanigans.

"Lots" of students went to the dean? How many?

How do you know what they said? Were you in the room?

They ALL had a part time job at CVS? How many part time jobs are at CVS there, exactly?

You're saying what you think sounds good and is convincing here, not what you really know about.
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Old 04-26-2013, 01:25 PM
 
28,895 posts, read 54,352,352 times
Reputation: 46718
As someone who has functioned in the executive suite for several decades, I can say that learning to actually articulate one's thoughts in a precise and compelling way without jargon is one of the biggest determinants of long-term career success. I'm amazed how some people have gone through 12-16-18 years of education, yet cannot put together a simple sentence.

It's English. It's your mother tongue. You hear it, speak it, write it, and read it every day. Hey, if you immigrated here from Pakistan or Brazil and English is your second language, I would be incredibly supportive of you. What's more, I'm not even saying that you have to write with the lyrical elegance of James Joyce. But if you grew up and were educated in the United States and cannot express yourself clearly without grammatical errors or misspelled words, then I automatically have serious doubts about your intelligence, and would assume that your sloppiness would intrude into other areas of your professional life.

Last edited by cpg35223; 04-26-2013 at 01:34 PM..
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Old 04-26-2013, 02:09 PM
 
318 posts, read 569,321 times
Reputation: 286
So the Business Communication Professor or the manager should hold people who grew up in America to a different standard. Interesting. With the new immigration bill the country will be flooded with twice as many immigrants as before, so the country will be full of people who are ESL. With communications so important in the world of work, will this flood of immigration impact our prosperity with so few workers able to communicate?

People like the poster below wants to give them a break, but will the customers, clients and competition?

Quote:
Originally Posted by cpg35223 View Post
As someone who has functioned in the executive suite for several decades, I can say that learning to actually articulate one's thoughts in a precise and compelling way without jargon is one of the biggest determinants of long-term career success. I'm amazed how some people have gone through 12-16-18 years of education, yet cannot put together a simple sentence.

It's English. It's your mother tongue. You hear it, speak it, write it, and read it every day. Hey, if you immigrated here from Pakistan or Brazil and English is your second language, I would be incredibly supportive of you. What's more, I'm not even saying that you have to write with the lyrical elegance of James Joyce. But if you grew up and were educated in the United States and cannot express yourself clearly without grammatical errors or misspelled words, then I automatically have serious doubts about your intelligence, and would assume that your sloppiness would intrude into other areas of your professional life.
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Old 04-26-2013, 02:32 PM
 
Location: Washington, DC
4,320 posts, read 5,166,048 times
Reputation: 8277
Quote:
Originally Posted by cpg35223 View Post
As someone who has functioned in the executive suite for several decades, I can say that learning to actually articulate one's thoughts in a precise and compelling way without jargon is one of the biggest determinants of long-term career success. I'm amazed how some people have gone through 12-16-18 years of education, yet cannot put together a simple sentence.

It's English. It's your mother tongue. You hear it, speak it, write it, and read it every day. Hey, if you immigrated here from Pakistan or Brazil and English is your second language, I would be incredibly supportive of you. What's more, I'm not even saying that you have to write with the lyrical elegance of James Joyce. But if you grew up and were educated in the United States and cannot express yourself clearly without grammatical errors or misspelled words, then I automatically have serious doubts about your intelligence, and would assume that your sloppiness would intrude into other areas of your professional life.
I agree, in professional settings people gravitate toward clearly-enunciating, well-spoken people, to include volume and body language. So if the boss gets sick, who is asked to fill in at the big senior meeting, the techy w/ the advanced degree(s) and the murmering voice, or the confident Jon Stewart clone?

Born in the US, India, China or Timbuktu, when business is conducted in English, good clear communication in writing and especially in person is ability #1. Put me and my decent resume in say Argentina (with my meager Spanish language skills), and I wouldn't expect to be much more than a dishwasher.
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Old 04-26-2013, 03:16 PM
 
28,895 posts, read 54,352,352 times
Reputation: 46718
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Spock View Post
So the Business Communication Professor or the manager should hold people who grew up in America to a different standard. Interesting. With the new immigration bill the country will be flooded with twice as many immigrants as before, so the country will be full of people who are ESL. With communications so important in the world of work, will this flood of immigration impact our prosperity with so few workers able to communicate?

People like the poster below wants to give them a break, but will the customers, clients and competition?
Good grief. I see that you're one of those tedious people who can't enter any conversation without trying to score a political point.

No, I'm simply stating that if someone who is well qualified is a legal immigrant and does not have 100% fluency in the English language, then I'm apt to cut that person a little more slack than the average native-born American who was born in this country but was too trifling to absorb the fundamentals of grammar. After all, at least I know that immigrant had the wherewithal to get up and move here in search of a better life. You know, just like almost our ancestors.
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Old 04-26-2013, 03:19 PM
 
28,895 posts, read 54,352,352 times
Reputation: 46718
Quote:
Originally Posted by Back to NE View Post
I agree, in professional settings people gravitate toward clearly-enunciating, well-spoken people, to include volume and body language. So if the boss gets sick, who is asked to fill in at the big senior meeting, the techy w/ the advanced degree(s) and the murmering voice, or the confident Jon Stewart clone?

Born in the US, India, China or Timbuktu, when business is conducted in English, good clear communication in writing and especially in person is ability #1. Put me and my decent resume in say Argentina (with my meager Spanish language skills), and I wouldn't expect to be much more than a dishwasher.
Exactly. I always told those working under me that, everyday, they should be prepared to be called into a meeting with someone. That means being able to speak as if you have not just rolled in off the farm. When you're asking a client to spend thousands of dollars with you, sometimes hundreds of thousands, then the last thing you want that client thinking is, "Geez. Did you never learn subject/verb agreement in school?" It's not exactly a confidence builder.
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Old 04-26-2013, 03:22 PM
 
9,346 posts, read 16,739,408 times
Reputation: 15810
From what I have seen of young people today, many of them need all the help they can get. Due to their constant texting, computers, IPads, IPods, IPhones, etc. (note the constant I ((me, me, me??)) I feel young people today have lost their ability to communicate face-to-face. They are clueless regarding body language or eye contact.
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Old 04-26-2013, 04:42 PM
 
Location: Richmond, VA
5,071 posts, read 6,388,275 times
Reputation: 7235
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Spock View Post
People like the poster below wants to give them a break, but will the customers, clients and competition?

Sure I would. Especially if the immigrant is capable of the most trifling task like, I don't know, getting a sheet of paper from a person without freaking out about it.
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Old 04-28-2013, 08:39 PM
 
2,017 posts, read 5,651,149 times
Reputation: 1680
Quote:
Originally Posted by Heidi60 View Post
Ethics? Anyone teaching business ethics today???

Apparently, the business world wanted basic classes taught so their future employees can do more than FB. I hope it raises the standards above what we now have.
Ethics was required for my Bachelors in Accounting (BS degree)-- my school also required it for Marketing, Business Administration and Finance bachelor degrees as well

It is also required as part of the Core in for my MBA.
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