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Old 02-17-2014, 01:44 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Momma_bear View Post
I agree with your last statement but many young people are able to party on the weekends and still become educated. Just because someone parties in college that does not mean partying is the purpose of being there. Not everyone has to party in college but there are plenty of students who manage to party and still obtain an education.
Things have changed greatly since you and I were in college.

College is more expensive, competition for graduate school, jobs, etc. far greater, consequences for "partying" much stricter, and so on.....

The reality is that if a child remotely thinks "partying" should be a significantly, even weekly, part of their college life, they are inevitably going to miss out on other opportunities down the road. Now maybe for many of those people they think it is worth it. Personally, I think many, maybe even most, college kids need to stop worrying about the "experience" and focus more on the education part.
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Old 02-17-2014, 05:20 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lkb0714 View Post
Things have changed greatly since you and I were in college.

College is more expensive, competition for graduate school, jobs, etc. far greater, consequences for "partying" much stricter, and so on.....

The reality is that if a child remotely thinks "partying" should be a significantly, even weekly, part of their college life, they are inevitably going to miss out on other opportunities down the road. Now maybe for many of those people they think it is worth it. Personally, I think many, maybe even most, college kids need to stop worrying about the "experience" and focus more on the education part.
I really don't think things have changed all that much. I don't understand why college students would need 24 hours a day/7 days a week to do well in school. A student with good time management skills should have no problem carving out Friday and Saturday nights for socializing and still be able to keep up with their school work.
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Old 02-17-2014, 05:41 PM
 
Location: Middle America
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhans123 View Post
These first two questions are in the past tense, if you're in college currently then the present tense can be assumed.

Did you party in college? (If so, how often?)
Well, depends on how you are defining "party.". Drink with friends? Yes, sometimes. Go to large parties? Not often, I'm more a small groups girl. But once in a while. Frat parties? Very rarely. Not my scene, not fun to me. Also, frats weren't big on my campus, anyway.

Quote:
Do you wish you would've partied more/less than you did?
I feel like i hit a pretty good balance. I don't feel like I missed out on socializing, OR wasted a ton of time on idiot pursuits/made big mistakes I regret/screwed up my studies. I did well, graduated with honors, studied in other countries, made lifelong friends, and feel like I had fun doing it. I was a serious student, but took time to socialize, too. I was pretty disciplined, though, and never did anything nuts. Just not really who I am. So, like, waking up in Tijuana with no pants over spring break? Not really me.

Quote:
What are the best activities/ways to have good social life in college?
Being involved in a lot of different activities with a lot of different crowds. One of the best things about college socially was the diminished importance of hanging with any one particular crowd.
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Old 02-17-2014, 05:42 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Momma_bear View Post
I really don't think things have changed all that much.
Well we can agree to disagree. For the record, my daughter is in college right now, in my department. I can see exactly how much they changed. And I also teach as an adjunct both at the CC and uni level.

Quote:
I don't understand why college students would need 24 hours a day/7 days a week to do well in school.
I thought I stated that in the post you quoted but if you want me to say it again I can.

Lets start with an obvious one. The consequences of underage drinking are vastly different now than they were 20 years ago. That is fact. Twenty years ago, students got a slap on the wrist from the campus police. Many schools now tie scholarships to not getting in trouble with drinking while underage.

Another simple one. In many schools, large classes (i.e. bio 101, calc 1, and so on) now require exams to be given all at once (to prevent cheating) and on Saturdays or Sundays when most students do not have exams.

Computer lab hours, study groups, tutoring, is most available without long waits on the weekends. A little hard to get up Saturday morning to go get time for X if you were partying until 4am.

Quote:
A student with good time management skills should have no problem carving out Friday and Saturday nights for socializing and still be able to keep up with their school work.
I thought we were talking about partying specifically? Socializing, is a vastly different animal.

Partying, implies alcohol, hangovers, very late nights, and so on.

Socializing need not include any of those.

And lets be clear, nearly 50% of students feel they do not have enough time to do their schools work, 88% do not have good time management skills. Maybe we shouldn't be encouraging them to party since at least half don't have the skill even you think are required to manage partying.

College students struggle with organizational skills
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Old 02-17-2014, 05:47 PM
 
Location: Middle America
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The assumption that if you are a student and drink, you are getting into trouble does not match my personal experience. I didn't drink underage, except when I was a student in countries where the drinking age was lower (Ireland at 18-19), so I wasn't underage, there, anyway. I never once got in trouble while drinking, either in college or after.
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Old 02-17-2014, 06:03 PM
 
16,825 posts, read 17,736,880 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
The assumption that if you are a student and drink, you are getting into trouble does not match my personal experience. I didn't drink underage, except when I was a student in countries where the drinking age was lower (Ireland at 18-19), so I wasn't underage, there, anyway. I never once got in trouble while drinking, either in college or after.
And how long ago was that?

My daughter had to sign a paper at financial aid that if she was convicted of underage drinking she would loose all of her scholarships (the ones from the college). I had a student get booted from Cornell, just last semester for underage drinking. His roommate faced criminal charges for being the one to supply the alcohol.

http://www.collegedrinkingprevention.../snapshot.aspx

Apaprently 25% of college students admit that drinking is negatively impacting their education. Over 1 in 10, say they have vandalized property while drinking.
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Old 02-17-2014, 06:09 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhans123 View Post
These first two questions are in the past tense, if you're in college currently then the present tense can be assumed.

Did you party in college? (If so, how often?) Barely

Do you wish you would've partied more/less than you did? More

What are the best activities/ways to have good social life in college? Get as involved as possible. Take up leadership roles in the activities/groups you are most interested in (e.g. a sport or other club) and talk to anyone and everyone; those who do not become your best friends can still be acquaintances. The more people you know - in college and in life - the better.
That is all.
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Old 02-17-2014, 06:33 PM
 
1,712 posts, read 2,908,647 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhans123 View Post
These first two questions are in the past tense, if you're in college currently then the present tense can be assumed.

Did you party in college? (If so, how often?)

Do you wish you would've partied more/less than you did?

What are the best activities/ways to have good social life in college?
I partied when I first went away to school for my junior year.

My school was in a very cold location and ppl would go to house parties right from the bus stop and walk to the houses in just a dress shirt or mini-skirt. They said the more you drink: the less you feel it.

They were fun at first but I eventually started to hate those parties and they were dangerous and crowded. I lost expensive items out there and even got kicked out of a party for dancing too 'provocative'. I through up on the bus also all over myself. I would say i've gone out maybe 8-12 times which was more than enough. I've been to one smaller house party which was EXCELLENT- I much prefer that.

This is my last year of school and I have not partied at all. I drink a very lil tiny bit of alcohol every now and then and I very rarely smoke MJ anymore b/c I don't want that stuff in my system when I graduate and go job hunting. I prefer smoking 1000000000x more than drinking but hey, a career is more important so gotta do whatcha gotta do..
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Old 02-17-2014, 06:36 PM
 
1,712 posts, read 2,908,647 times
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As for if you want to make friends...I would REALLY try to be outgoing towards suitmates/roommates and ppl in your class. It's very easy and natural for a friendship to build this way since you live near each other and won't have to go the way to associate with each other.

For guys its much harder to make friends since all they care about is hookin up with girls.

For me PERSONALLY, joining clubs have been useless to me when it came to making friends. But hey, maybe that's just me...i'd still say give it a try! Just have a good attitude and be very outgoing. Good luck!
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Old 02-17-2014, 06:40 PM
 
Location: Middle America
37,409 posts, read 53,584,768 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lkb0714 View Post
And how long ago was that?

My daughter had to sign a paper at financial aid that if she was convicted of underage drinking she would loose all of her scholarships (the ones from the college). I had a student get booted from Cornell, just last semester for underage drinking. His roommate faced criminal charges for being the one to supply the alcohol.

College Drinking: A Snapshot of Annual High-Risk College Drinking Consequences

Apaprently 25% of college students admit that drinking is negatively impacting their education. Over 1 in 10, say they have vandalized property while drinking.
15 years ago. I, too, would have forfeited my scholarships had I been convictrd of underage drinking. Not a problem, as I didn't drink underage. Not all drinking is illegal or underage. Or irresponsible. I wasn't an irresponsible drinker when I was a student, and I'm not now. I never vandalized property or experienced any of the legal drinking I did impacting my academic performance. Students are capable of drinking both legally and responsibly.
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