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Old 02-19-2014, 08:30 PM
 
16,825 posts, read 17,785,611 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Momma_bear View Post
Whatever. You totally misrepresented what I wrote. If that makes you happy I'll go with it.

I consider partying to include drinking, not necessarily binge drinking. You can define it any way you like. I stand by my statement that students who have good time management skills can party on the weekends and still do fine in school.
Ok. According to the sources up thread, that is 12% of students. So for them Yay, certainly no negative effects of drinking in anyway. For the rest, maybe they should avoid partying.
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Old 02-19-2014, 08:45 PM
 
20,793 posts, read 61,429,497 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lkb0714 View Post
Great your kids are the exception. So are their friends. Everyone you have ever met. Got it.

Study: Inverse relationship between alcohol abuse and college GPA | Penn State University

Undergraduate Drinking and Academic Performance: A Prospective Investigation With Objective Measures

Alcohol Consumption, Sleep, and Academic Performance Among College Students - Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs

That is not the reality for the vast majority of students. BTW, just for the record you cannot dispute a correlation with anecdotes or attacks on my own children (who do not drink anyway). Numbers don't lie, kids who drink have lower GPAs than their peers who do not. Those are findings of literally dozens, maybe hundreds of studies.
Can you not understand the difference between having a couple drinks and abuse??

You really think your kids don't drink?
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Old 02-20-2014, 12:00 AM
 
47,525 posts, read 69,833,752 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhans123 View Post
These first two questions are in the past tense, if you're in college currently then the present tense can be assumed.

Did you party in college? (If so, how often?)

Do you wish you would've partied more/less than you did?

What are the best activities/ways to have good social life in college?
I worked anywhere from 35 to 56 hours while going to college full time so I had some hours to party. I sometimes partied with people at college but more often with co-workers after work. Usually about once a week.

About the same -- it must have been about the right amount because it's what I wanted at the time.

Since I had to work, I think the best way to have a good social life in college is to have some friends from college, and also workplace friends as well as a few other friends you keep from high school or the neighborhood for a while, plus family friends like cousins.
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Old 02-20-2014, 12:09 AM
 
47,525 posts, read 69,833,752 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lkb0714 View Post
Move the goal posts all you like. I never said students shouldn't socialize. But if you want to pretend the term used by the OP and in all of my posts, "partying" ,does not imply alcohol, red solo cups, and so on, go nuts. It does not make it so, and certainly does not remotely change the fact that for the vast majority of college students, "partying" is about drinking, and for some 40% of them that means binge drinking.
But that means for 60% it's not about binge drinking. Drinking might be one or two beers over a 4 hour time span, or a couple glasses of wine.
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Old 02-20-2014, 12:20 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, 615' Elevation, Zone 8b - originally from SF Bay Area
44,730 posts, read 81,641,337 times
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Did you party in college? (If so, how often?) Never, I was working full time while in college and had no time to party.

Do you wish you would've partied more/less than you did? No, it would have interfered with my ability to study. I did my partying in my 20s after graduating and getting a job (evenings and weekends).

What are the best activities/ways to have good social life in college? College is a place to become educated and acquire marketable skills, not a social club. This is why so many people have $100,000 in student loan debt and no job.
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Old 02-20-2014, 01:04 PM
 
11,642 posts, read 23,957,305 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lkb0714 View Post
Great your kids are the exception. So are their friends. Everyone you have ever met. Got it.

Study: Inverse relationship between alcohol abuse and college GPA | Penn State University

Undergraduate Drinking and Academic Performance: A Prospective Investigation With Objective Measures

Alcohol Consumption, Sleep, and Academic Performance Among College Students - Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs

That is not the reality for the vast majority of students. BTW, just for the record you cannot dispute a correlation with anecdotes or attacks on my own children (who do not drink anyway). Numbers don't lie, kids who drink have lower GPAs than their peers who do not. Those are findings of literally dozens, maybe hundreds of studies.
Your first link opens with the following sentence:

"College students who engage in binge drinking tend to earn lower grades than students who don’t abuse alcohol, according to a newly released report."

I'm going to go out on a limb and state that alcohol use and alcohol abuse are not the same thing.

Your second link states that:

"Consistent with past prospective research, the magnitude of the association between undergraduate alcohol use and academic performance is small when the effects of high school academic aptitude and performance are accounted for in multivariable analyses."

This hardly supports your thesis that anyone who parties at all in college is likely to do poorly.

Your third link states that:

"SAT score was the strongest predictor of GPA." although that source did go on to state that "alcohol had indirect effects on sleepiness and GPA, primarily through its effect on sleep schedule."

In general, I do think that your sources support the idea that there is a weak correlation between GPA and alcohol use. I do not think that your sources support the idea that it is problematic for students to party on the weekends.
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Old 02-20-2014, 01:06 PM
 
11,642 posts, read 23,957,305 times
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Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
College is a place to become educated and acquire marketable skills, not a social club. This is why so many people have $100,000 in student loan debt and no job.
Average student debt is around $29K at graduation. There really aren't so many people who have $100K in student loan debt.
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Old 02-20-2014, 01:08 PM
 
11,642 posts, read 23,957,305 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lkb0714 View Post
Ok. According to the sources up thread, that is 12% of students. So for them Yay, certainly no negative effects of drinking in anyway. For the rest, maybe they should avoid partying.
Isn't the problem for the 88% time management? I bet someone who has poor time management skills has problems in college regardless of whether they drink at all.
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Old 02-20-2014, 01:18 PM
 
16,825 posts, read 17,785,611 times
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Originally Posted by Momma_bear View Post
Isn't the problem for the 88% time management? I bet someone who has poor time management skills has problems in college regardless of whether they drink at all.
You are the one who keeps adding time management as a variable, and then complaining when I mention it.

My statement has always been that for the majority of students drinking is a bad idea and will likely adversely effect their performance. I never said that it was specifically the alcohol, in all likelihood it the alcohol combined with the staying up late, changing schedule, hangover, and so on. You tried to counter my statement by claiming if they have good time management skills they will be fine. EXCEPT ONLY 12% have their time management down. So your statement, while it might be true, does not remotely disprove the notion that the majority will likely suffer consequences.

This is a logical fallacy. And it does not matter how weak or strong the correlation, there just is one. A weak correlation does not suddenly prove the opposite position.
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Old 02-20-2014, 03:17 PM
 
11,642 posts, read 23,957,305 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lkb0714 View Post
You are the one who keeps adding time management as a variable, and then complaining when I mention it.
I didn't complain when you mentioned it. I simply mentioned that poor time management is really the problem, not weekend drinking.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lkb0714 View Post
My statement has always been that for the majority of students drinking is a bad idea and will likely adversely effect their performance. I never said that it was specifically the alcohol, in all likelihood it the alcohol combined with the staying up late, changing schedule, hangover, and so on. You tried to counter my statement by claiming if they have good time management skills they will be fine. EXCEPT ONLY 12% have their time management down. So your statement, while it might be true, does not remotely disprove the notion that the majority will likely suffer consequences.
Won't the 88% who have poor time management skills have poor time management skills even if they don't drink?

Quote:
Originally Posted by lkb0714 View Post
This is a logical fallacy. And it does not matter how weak or strong the correlation, there just is one. A weak correlation does not suddenly prove the opposite position.
It does matter how weak or strong a correlation is. I agree that a weak correlation does not prove the opposite position but it doesn't really prove the original position very well either. To me it says-there is an effect, but not a strong one.

One of the links you posted spoke of students with 10 binge drinking episodes in 14 days. I really don't need a study to prove to me that a student who spends 10 days out of 14 binge drinking is going to have problems in school( and in the rest of his life also). I also don't need a study to prove that a student who goes out and parties on the weekend will do just fine in school.
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