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Old 03-09-2020, 09:20 AM
 
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At Rice fraternities and sororities are forbidden and all students are assigned to one of 11 (used to be 8) residential colleges. Eliminates all the Greek BS. One of the major factors in my decision.
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Old 03-09-2020, 10:51 AM
 
Location: South Florida but looking to escape
105 posts, read 53,616 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by turf3 View Post
At Rice fraternities and sororities are forbidden and all students are assigned to one of 11 (used to be 8) residential colleges. Eliminates all the Greek BS. One of the major factors in my decision.
Do the RCs not function a kind of de facto Greek system?
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Old 03-09-2020, 11:22 AM
 
11,230 posts, read 9,552,522 times
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Originally Posted by Bartleby69 View Post
Do the RCs not function a kind of de facto Greek system?
Not really, because assignment is random and 100% of students are assigned to a college. No one is excluded from college life.
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Old 03-09-2020, 04:08 PM
 
Location: Greenville SC 'Waterfall City'
10,105 posts, read 7,529,029 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
Well, now I"m confused about what types of things the OP wants us to mention in the "what I liked about my college" column, so I'll just mention what comes to mind, whether it's about academics or non-academic features.

College: University of Washington, Seattle

1. Had plenty of interesting special-interest courses that had very small enrollment: 10-20 students (a rare few: 5-6 students), so it was far from the impersonal experience usually warned about in large public universities (i.e. huge survey courses with hundreds of students).

2. Had special-interest dorms. This really helps people make friends by forming w/people of similar interests.

3. Has a waterfront center on Lake Washington in a wetlands area. Popular for renting canoes on the weekends, and paddling around the marshes with the ducks and ducklings.

4. Has an ethnomusicology department. This tended to inspire students to organize their own bands in various exotic music traditions, which contributed immensely to the enrichment of the local music scene around town.
I said that I am not interested in academic stuff on this topic. I am interested in things that I could visit if I am in the area like UVA's Rotunda but hopefully less known and not sports related. It could be on campus or a restaurant, waterfall, etc in the local area.

No 3 on your list is the kind of thing I am talking about.

I'll give another one for Clemson.

The Clemson campus is surrounded by the university's 17,500 acre experimental forest. According to the Clemson website, they believe it is the largest research and teaching forest contiguous with the main campus of a public university in the U.S.

It has biking/hiking trails and at least 3 waterfalls. It also has Issaqueena dam that Clemson students and others slide down although you are not suppose to go on the dam. Here's a Youtube video of it:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BSQt6NjlI74

Last edited by ClemVegas; 03-09-2020 at 04:44 PM..
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Old 03-09-2020, 05:46 PM
 
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I also went to the University of Washington. I do remember not having any Friday classes while in graduate school, so my wife and I would go for walks every Friday morning at one of many city, county, state parks bordering the miles and miles of the Puget Sound coastline in Seattle. Then we would go to Uwajimaya's (a Japanese grocery/retail store), get a box lunch, and eat it outside somewhere. After my wife popped the big one (giving birth to our son), she joined other mothers in pushing a stroller around Green Lake to get back in shape. We also enjoyed wandering around and visiting many of the small shops (lots of ethnic restaurants) on the west side of the main campus. It did not rain too much that winter. From the roof of our apartment building, we also used to watch seaplanes take off from Union Bay.
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Old 03-09-2020, 09:25 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
102,588 posts, read 109,463,152 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ClemVegas View Post
I said that I am not interested in academic stuff on this topic. I am interested in things that I could visit if I am in the area like UVA's Rotunda but hopefully less known and not sports related. It could be on campus or a restaurant, waterfall, etc in the local area.

No 3 on your list is the kind of thing I am talking about.

I'll give another one for Clemson.

The Clemson campus is surrounded by the university's 17,500 acre experimental forest. According to the Clemson website, they believe it is the largest research and teaching forest contiguous with the main campus of a public university in the U.S.

It has biking/hiking trails and at least 3 waterfalls. It also has Issaqueena dam that Clemson students and others slide down although you are not suppose to go on the dam. Here's a Youtube video of it:
Then you'd enjoy the UW Arboretum, which also has hiking trails, botanical gardens and other attractions that I haven't even begun to explore.

https://botanicgardens.uw.edu/washin...ark-arboretum/

The UW university grounds are wonderful to explore, as well. There's a fountain; a hidden glenn for quiet study, meditation, or private picnicking; a rose garden (surrounding the fountain); and a corner of Northwest cedar forest. The University also has two museums, the Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture (the oldest museum in Washington State, with a new Native cuisine restaurant) and the Henry Art Gallery.
http://www.burkemuseum.org

Did I hit the mark this time?

Last edited by Ruth4Truth; 03-09-2020 at 09:36 PM..
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Old 03-10-2020, 03:49 AM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
3,701 posts, read 3,525,973 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ClemVegas View Post
I'd like to hear about things that I could see like botanical gardens, buildings, campus layout and landscaping, waterfalls/whitewater rivers/ lakes nearby, restaurants near the campus, etc.

Another example would be I like the architecture of the clock tower building at Clemson, Tillman Hall.

Tillman Hall and Bowman Field Nov 1954 by clemsonstepp, on Flickr

The tower has a carillon with 48 bells that are played by a person using a keyboard in the tower and set up to automatically chime the bells every 15 minutes.

There are only 66 universities or schools in the US that have a carillon on campus according to this list. http://www.towerbells.org/data/IXNATRinstype.html.
I attended the University of Toronto, which also has a carillon in Soldier's Tower at Hart House. Carillon concerts are held on summer evenings, and at other appropriate times during the school year. I should add that Soldier's Tower also contains a museum, containing relics and mementos of the University faculty and students who fought in WWI and WWII.

The University of Toronto has many beautiful, architecturally-significant buildings. Hart House, opened 1919, is in the "Collegiate Gothic" style. University College (est. 1853) is a beautiful example of Romanesque architecture. And for 1960s "Brutal" architecture, you can't beat the Robarts Library. Looked at from a certain angle, it looks like a giant concrete turkey.

Up until fairly recently, the University of Toronto had the Botany Greenhouses. These were greenhouses that hosted all kinds of plants from all over the world. I knew one of the horticulturalists when I was a student there, and he would let me into the greenhouse, to enjoy a cup of coffee under the palm, coffee, and banana trees, beside the koi pond--something I particularly enjoyed when the weather outside was well below freezing, and a blizzard was hitting Toronto. The land they sat on became too valuable to support simple greenhouses, but I'm glad to say that the University's greenhouses--and the plants they contained--were moved, intact, to another location.
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Old 03-10-2020, 03:07 PM
Status: "Trump/Vance 2024" (set 14 hours ago)
 
Location: Annandale, VA
7,461 posts, read 2,969,744 times
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It was cheap. No student debt when I graduated.
The nearest fast food restaurant was 30 miles away. You ate in the cafeteria or learned to cook.
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Old 03-10-2020, 05:10 PM
 
Location: Greenville SC 'Waterfall City'
10,105 posts, read 7,529,029 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
Then you'd enjoy the UW Arboretum, which also has hiking trails, botanical gardens and other attractions that I haven't even begun to explore.

https://botanicgardens.uw.edu/washin...ark-arboretum/

The UW university grounds are wonderful to explore, as well. There's a fountain; a hidden glenn for quiet study, meditation, or private picnicking; a rose garden (surrounding the fountain); and a corner of Northwest cedar forest. The University also has two museums, the Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture (the oldest museum in Washington State, with a new Native cuisine restaurant) and the Henry Art Gallery.
http://www.burkemuseum.org

Did I hit the mark this time?
Yes, well done.
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Old 03-11-2020, 07:10 AM
 
Location: Central Mass
4,644 posts, read 5,002,768 times
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Where to start...

Ann Arbor is one of the best small cities in the country
Very nice museums
Nichols Arboretum is close to campus. It's a historic park designed by one of the founders of the ASLA - same guy who designed Lincoln Park and Lake Forest Cemetery in Chicago.
A very nice botanical garden.
Huron River runs between central campus and north campus. Very good for canoeing and kayaking.
Two of the biggest carillons in North America
Fourth biggest research library in North America (2, 3, 4 are separated by less than 400,000 volumes, but 6 million behind Harvard)
My family has owned a farm in town since 1862.
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