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Old 10-28-2008, 10:12 PM
 
Location: Road Warrior
2,016 posts, read 5,563,896 times
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Candidate 1. No drama. Assuming she has honors, she probably has community service, club activity to go with it. Essentially you will have to train the new employee all over again and if she can finish college in 3 years with honor, it would seem she should be able to pick things up rather fast. Anybody can finish college in 6 years with a B average, party and work at a grocery store.
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Old 10-28-2008, 10:17 PM
 
274 posts, read 604,655 times
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Also, what if a student did not have to work during the school year because he/she was smart enough to BUDGET and SAVE when he/she did work (over the summer, during breaks, etc) so that he/she didn't have to work during the school year and was able to keep his/her grades up?
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Old 10-28-2008, 10:21 PM
 
Location: Southern California
15,083 posts, read 20,396,999 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Refugee56 View Post
If you were an employer what candidate would you be more impressed with: (these are real people)

Candidate #1: Graduated with honors in three years but taking 18 credit hours per semester and summer school, but never worked while in college

Candidate #2 Graduated with a "b" Average but worked full time at a grocery store as a cashier full time but took six years to graduate.

All other aspects of their backgrounds are the same (communication skills, appearance, poise, etc.)
This is a tough decision.

If the job requires some level of work experience, then the answer is #2. If the job requires superior technical expertise or knowledge (as implied by the excellent grades), then the answer is #1. They appear to be equally motivated and hard working so it is hard to fault either in that regard.

In favor of #2, I'll add that a person who works through school has experience balancing two 'jobs' that may allow them to multi-task better. And they may be better socialized as they've been in a work environment with coworkers/customers for six years as opposed to staring at books all day. How technically sophisticated is the job? #1 is tops I'd say if he was applying for a position as a brain surgeon because if he's poking around in my head, I really, really want him to know what he's doing.

Subjectively, I would choose #2 because that was the kind of college student I was.
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Old 10-28-2008, 10:39 PM
 
274 posts, read 604,655 times
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What about "life experiences" as well. What if #1 had to work through some really tough sh*t in his/her life, while #2 was just your average joe?
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Old 10-28-2008, 11:15 PM
 
Location: Southern California
15,083 posts, read 20,396,999 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AngelEyez02403 View Post
What about "life experiences" as well. What if #1 had to work through some really tough sh*t in his/her life, while #2 was just your average joe?
Agreed.

That is why this is a tough decision. It could easily go either way. I knew someone like candidate #1 who was one of the boat people who were fleeing Vietnam after the fall of that country. Being familiar with that story, I'd give him the job because I'm of Vietnamese descent and I can relate. There is no magic formula that will address this conundrum. The employer could easily just flip a coin.
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Old 10-29-2008, 09:06 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
90,316 posts, read 120,193,363 times
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A lot of scholarships require a student to attend school full-time. Perhaps the first student was on scholarships. Perhaps he has student loans. There are a lot of unknowns here. Maybe the "B" student would have been a "B" student no matter what. Also, perhaps the first student made school his priority.
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Old 10-29-2008, 11:47 PM
 
4,796 posts, read 15,301,443 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Maturity doesn't necessarily come from working in college. I agree with AngelEye and I bet most employers would too. Since this is supposedly a true story, maybe the OP can tell us what happened.
I wasn't just referring to just "working in college". I was taking about an "older" graduate being more mature than a 20 year old. (three years?)
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Old 10-29-2008, 11:54 PM
 
274 posts, read 604,655 times
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The maturity level between a 20 and a 23 year old may not be that great. There are some 40 year olds that are less mature than 20 year olds...

"Maturity" is also quite ambiguous...
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Old 10-30-2008, 12:44 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
90,316 posts, read 120,193,363 times
Reputation: 35920
^^^I definitely agree with the above. I graduated from college in 3 yrs, b/c that's how the program I was in was set up. I turned 21 in June and graduated in August. I was mature enough for an entry level position, which I would assume is the job under consideration.
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Old 10-30-2008, 05:11 PM
 
442 posts, read 1,571,870 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cpg35223 View Post
So? I was a double major in Economics and English Literature at a pretty rigorous college. I wrote A LOT of papers.

But while you left class and headed to the library, I left class and went to my job as a reporter. I pretty much guarantee you that whenever you knocked off studying for the day, I was still at work, and would still be there long after you were done. Heck, go to school a couple of summer semesters, and you're done in three. Not knocking the difficulty of your major--quite the opposite. But it still isn't anywhere close to as demanding as a student who has to pay his own freight.

Hence my original position. If mom and dad are footing your bills, it's a lot easier than working your way through.
I would agree. As a current college student, and one that has to foot the majority of my own bills, my life would be a BREEZE if all I had to do was go to school. I can just imagine how simple life would be and what an accomplished student I would be if I could focus solely on school without having to factor in things like - Where will I live? What areas are affordable? What areas have job opportunities? How will I pay rent and misc. bills? Do I need roommates?
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