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Old 06-01-2009, 08:39 PM
hsw
 
2,144 posts, read 6,598,202 times
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Caliber of college, specific engineering major, GPA and no. of yrs needed to finish college all heavily factor into screening process of resumes before one is even given an interview at most leading companies

Once hired, obviously, prestige of college and/or GPA is quickly forgotten...and one's on-the-job perf is all that matters

Let's not forget that many of smartest, wealthiest engineers in Silicon Valley are college dropouts or dropouts of Stanford's CS/EE PhD program or guys who went to crappy undergrads before gaining entry to Stanford for grad school, etc

Going to a less prestigious college and/or having a mediocre GPA simply digs a deep hole early in one's career; not impossible to work way out of the hole, but odds increasingly stack against one, esp in a competitive world

Leading employers (w/deep history of lucrative career paths for their engineers at that co. or alums at future start-ups) tend to be able to pick best new engineers out of Stanford or Berkeley, etc...and vice-versa
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Old 06-02-2009, 05:31 AM
 
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When a hiring manager gets 150 resumes on his desk he isn't going to read them all. He will find specific criteria to cut down the stack. One method commonly used is cutting out the below 3.0s. Yes it is unfair but time is money.
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Old 06-02-2009, 02:35 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
15,299 posts, read 48,904,002 times
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What Killer said - the GPA is more important in getting an interview, than in getting hired. If you have a low GPA you can still be OK if you have a good enough story - working full time, hardcore school like MIT or even Georgia Tech - provided you get the interview.

Every outfit I have ever hired on with asked about GPA. They didn't obsess on it, but they did ask and wanted a proper transcript from the University.

To the OP - whatever GPA you graduate with will be with you for life, a bad GPA or even a mediocre one is not as bad to have on your record as a felony conviction, but it's not good either.

So hit the books. Besides that some of the stuff you learn in college they actually will use on the job...
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Old 06-03-2009, 11:02 AM
 
Location: Rockland County New York
2,984 posts, read 5,431,618 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FreshFresh View Post
I've heard that generally employers dont really look at your gpa. Does this hold true in the Engineering field?

I mean as long as your have your degree, does it matter if you have a like a 2.5 gpa?
I imagine every job expect a good gpa. Mine was 3.5 for teaching and it is still hard to get an interview.
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Old 06-03-2009, 01:24 PM
 
Location: Sandpoint, Idaho
2,993 posts, read 5,635,771 times
Reputation: 3240
Quote:
Originally Posted by hsw View Post
Caliber of college, specific engineering major, GPA and no. of yrs needed to finish college all heavily factor into screening process of resumes before one is even given an interview at most leading companies

Once hired, obviously, prestige of college and/or GPA is quickly forgotten...and one's on-the-job perf is all that matters

Let's not forget that many of smartest, wealthiest engineers in Silicon Valley are college dropouts or dropouts of Stanford's CS/EE PhD program or guys who went to crappy undergrads before gaining entry to Stanford for grad school, etc

Going to a less prestigious college and/or having a mediocre GPA simply digs a deep hole early in one's career; not impossible to work way out of the hole, but odds increasingly stack against one, esp in a competitive world

Leading employers (w/deep history of lucrative career paths for their engineers at that co. or alums at future start-ups) tend to be able to pick best new engineers out of Stanford or Berkeley, etc...and vice-versa
Exactly...of course it is not the end of the world, but the path to the top starts with a detour. Like losing the first game in a double elimination tournament.

And then going to grad. school. Say you switch careers to something like public policy. DO really think an interviewer, perhaps one who majored in sociology, a program where 4.0 GPAs are fairly frequent, will be able to judge a 3.1 in mechanical engineering from a top 10 school? LOL! They won;t. "Oh...you only got a 3.1..."

GPAs are the the first item in the paper trail you will generate in life (assuming no criminal record). Get above a 3.3 and you are safe. and never have to think twice about the GPA...like getting 1400+ on the old SAT. You are safe with room to spare. 1400 vs. 1500, who gives a crap? 3.3 vs. 3.5, what is the diff? But 2.5 from a lesser known school (or even from a top school, where grade inflation creates a left-skewed distribution), those few years out can be tough...
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Old 06-06-2009, 08:41 PM
 
52 posts, read 188,706 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FreshFresh View Post
I've heard that generally employers dont really look at your gpa. Does this hold true in the Engineering field?

I mean as long as your have your degree, does it matter if you have a like a 2.5 gpa?
Trust me, it matters a whole lot out there in the cut-throat job world.
They will usually want your transcripts for at least the first one or two jobs you get out of school. Most internships want a min. 3.0 or better to get in.
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Old 02-21-2010, 08:59 PM
 
Location: Union City
9 posts, read 156,249 times
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I'm a successful engineer in a small electro optics company and GPA was not a consideration. In the end they were more interested in what I've done and how I did it. GPA means diddly when compared to what type of work you will be doing. For the most part you don't do anything you studied in college. Really what companies look for are work experience and if you can fit the description of the job they advertised and most of all will you fit in with the other co-workers. Working in a engineering company is about team work and about doing your work efficiently. If you have below 3.0, the only people who will care is the graduate school you are applying to because that's an academic performance rating which also for the most part is biased. Also don't lock yourself into a box, whose to say you will love doing engineering in 2-3 years. It's not for everyone, but realize that what a lot of these people are saying is mostly full of ****.

If you are really adamant about working in engineering don't shoot for the big companies at first. Remember if you work for a big company, you have the same chances of getting fired as you do in a small company. You will be just another # there. In a small company at least you can rise to the top a little bit faster. Also don't shoot for design engineer when starting out, when realistically you might do better as a manufacturing engineer or as test engineer or a field service engineer, or an applications engineer. Really what I'm trying to say is think outside of the box in terms of employment and don't let something like GPA affect your employment. If a company will be hiring on gpa alone, then that is not the place to work because performance then can not be based on individual work performance or merit but rather will be measured by your prior academic performances.
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Old 02-21-2010, 09:03 PM
 
Location: Union City
9 posts, read 156,249 times
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Also try doing internships at school or look for research jobs in the department at your school or in something you are interested in at your school. Chances are you professor will know someone in industry and that can be your ticket into a corporate internship. Though realize that an internship with a company is nothing glamorous. In most cases you are doing something menial, but purposely so that you get a feel of what normal everyday work is like. You will not be put on high profile projects, but at least you can get an idea of what is being done. Like I said in a previous post, shoot for smaller things, but for things you want to do in your field. Go for smaller companies. I say this because even if they aren't willing to pay for an internship, you can gain valuable experience and in the end it can build your resume.
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Old 02-24-2010, 09:42 AM
 
Location: Whoville....
25,387 posts, read 32,380,856 times
Reputation: 14639
Quote:
Originally Posted by FreshFresh View Post
I've heard that generally employers dont really look at your gpa. Does this hold true in the Engineering field?

I mean as long as your have your degree, does it matter if you have a like a 2.5 gpa?
I don't know about now but when I graduated in 1995, it mattered a lot. A 2.5 is a very low enginering GPA. Because engineering students are considered the cream of the crop, they are expected to have good GPA's. Given we've dummied down just about everything, maybe that's changed.
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Old 02-24-2010, 02:31 PM
 
Location: USA - midwest
5,943 posts, read 5,122,875 times
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Default With a Degree in Engineering, does GPA really matter

Your GPA will be important in securing your first and maybe second positions out of college. What employers really want to see is how you performed on the job. The further you get from graduation, the less meaningful your GPA becomes. But your experience and accomplishments will be increasingly relevant. If you're stuck working on nickel and dime assignments rather than on product development or big projects, your prospective employers will get a much better picture of you as an engineer than anything your GPA could tell them.

Set your goal to be "noticed" in your first job, regardless of your GPA.
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