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Old 07-21-2009, 05:18 PM
 
Location: Bronx, NY
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If you are a full time student it is hard. A lot of work and a lot of reading. I'm getting my Master's in computer security.
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Old 07-21-2009, 05:35 PM
 
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School does not come easy at all! I am a full time student and a full time employee. I am not a slacker and begin an assignment immediately upon receiving it. I think I am going for masters in Public Administration. That is if I go, I have worked hard for my bachelors and really enjoyed it, it was not easy. Now I am just wondering if I should stop or continue.
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Old 07-22-2009, 07:07 PM
 
Location: SE Florida
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I have a graduate degree and appove of this message.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
Strong readers and writers who are cool with working nearly exclusively under their own steam will do fine. Don't expect a lot of hand-holding, and don't expect slack to be given if you don't keep up with the reading or assignments. It amazes me that there are people who come out of undergrad not having experienced that, but it happens.
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Old 07-22-2009, 11:12 PM
 
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It's going to depend on program and circumstances, but grad school is a lot of work. I went to school full-time, and put in long, long hours. Classes themselves don't take up a huge amount of time, but there's an enormous amount of reading, writing, and research to be completed. On the other hand, one nice thing about grad school as opposed to to the undergrad years is that more of your classes are going to be on similar topics. Having a common theme running throughout all, or at least most, was a luxury.

LovingSAT, if you're not sure about grad school I highly suggest you consider putting it off for a year or two; sometimes it can be hard to go back, but at the same time you might find that some time in the workforce will help you more at this point in time than would an advanced degree. I know many people who took a few years "off" before going back, and they were very happy with that decision. There are pluses and minuses to both approaches, of course, but it's something to consider.
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Old 07-24-2009, 01:49 PM
 
Location: Orlando, FL
258 posts, read 808,945 times
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For me it was a ton of reading and re-reading. The studying and workload was two or three times greater for me than what was for my Bachelors. Most days were spent going to class, and then directly after going to study, and then at night meeting up with my classmates to do a group study. I was getting a technical degree, so I didn't have as many papers, but a lot of projects and programming. I found some time to have fun though, but it was a lot of work.
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Old 07-24-2009, 01:59 PM
 
Location: El Paso, TX
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I just completed my masters and I am working on a second one. Pretty much what others posted is true. Dedication is a must. You do a lot of research and a lot of reading. Multiple choice questions tests are pretty much out of the picture.

Where you may run into some frustration is when you have to do research as a group. Some in the group my do their fair share and may end up getting the same grade you do even though you did most of the work.

You have a great day.
El Amigo
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Old 07-24-2009, 02:23 PM
 
Location: Ann Arbor, MI
804 posts, read 1,354,337 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elamigo View Post
I just completed my masters and I am working on a second one. Pretty much what others posted is true. Dedication is a must. You do a lot of research and a lot of reading. Multiple choice questions tests are pretty much out of the picture.

Where you may run into some frustration is when you have to do research as a group. Some in the group my do their fair share and may end up getting the same grade you do even though you did most of the work.

You have a great day.
El Amigo
What is a multiple choice question?

Kidding aside, I agree with El Amigo, you are looking into a lot of work, but it's very rewarding work.

I remember through my undergrad a lot of the homework was busy-work, where you had to solve a barrage of problems most of which someone had specially crafted to be solved with the tools provided in the course, or whose answers could be found in a book.

Now in grad school, specially on the more advanced classes, you would get homeworks with one or two problems that take 6-10 hours to get through, and likely have no correct answer. Or at least no one has figured it out yet. You have to deal with a lot of ambiguity and make choices about the approach and direction of your solutions. A lot of the time professors are looking more at how you approach the problem than if you get to the answer or not.

Also, compared to undergrad, I think a lot of professors see you more as a "newbie colleague" than as a student. So they are more willing to spend large amounts of time discussing different approaches and ideas about the material that you might have. So it's really easy to start forming relationships with your professors that transcend the course that you are taking.

Also, be prepared to do a lot of reading, get really good at using search engines (they are really your friend, and will help you weed out information that is not relevant), and to have to carry someones dead weight from time to time in a group project. It happens, but you can almost always get back at the individual when you have to turn in a group evaluation form o something similar, do be aware that a lot of these people have families and other obligations, so sometimes when you sit down and talk to them you find out that they were not just being lazy, but a kid or spouse was sick, or something like that.
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Old 07-24-2009, 07:59 PM
 
Location: Palm Beach Gardens, Fla
1,887 posts, read 7,915,247 times
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Don't put it off- just do it. If you get tired of it (or if your schedule doesn't allow you to continue) you can always postpone it until you're ready to go back. One year from now, you don't want to torture yourself by thinking that you could have already been one year into your program already. I agree with the others to say that it is hard work but since this is a field that you have chosen (I presume this is your choice and no one else's) then it should be enjoyable. Graduate school is for independent learners so you want to make sure you are on top of things. Not only should you be prepared to learn, but be prepared to contribute as well.
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Old 07-24-2009, 08:31 PM
 
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i just started my 2nd year of grad school. i entered right after completing my ba. overall i find it much easier than undergrad, however there are classes i am super nervous about not passing (a b- in my core classes is not considered a passing grade). basically the only things i find more difficult about it is that anything below a b is considered a low grade and that you cannot really pick when and what kind of classes you can take because grad programs are usually small (mine has 19 people in my year). we also have to take a comprehensive exam in may (a month before we walk for graduation). if you do not pass that, you have i think one more chance to take it but not till november. if you dont pass it the 2nd time, i believe you do not receive your MS but "course credit". that part for me is very nerve wrecking because i pretty much dont remember anything from my pass courses and rely on papers and other assignments to keep up my grades rather than tests.
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Old 07-24-2009, 08:33 PM
 
15,440 posts, read 21,210,802 times
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It's been many years since I was a graduate student (30 years) but as I recall my masters seemed easier than my undergraduate degree. Building on a previous degree in biology, my graduate program in biology seemed to be simply a rehash and reinforcement of things I had already learned. However, I do distinctly remember finally understanding as a graduate student some of the complex biological processes and theories that I had only memorized as an undergraduate.
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