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Old 08-06-2009, 09:02 PM
f_m
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ticky909 View Post
How about some numbers? I'm an undergrad right now and spend a minimum of 60 hours a week on school taking 5 classes (10 hrs in class/50 hrs outside+). I've never really had any help or instruction from professors, I'm starting to worry about what the 'no hand holding' would be like in grad school. What are the upper and lower limits of classes you can take as a graduate student? I'm asking you guys because somebody affiliated with the school will tell you anything to make sure you hand a check over.
What kind of numbers are you talking about? It depends on the program and field of study, not just the school.

If you do non-thesis program, then you take more classes than a thesis program. Of course if you take thesis, then you are required to do some kind of research/paper, and possibly have it published.
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Old 08-07-2009, 12:59 AM
 
Location: Ann Arbor, MI
804 posts, read 1,360,060 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ticky909 View Post
How about some numbers? I'm an undergrad right now and spend a minimum of 60 hours a week on school taking 5 classes (10 hrs in class/50 hrs outside+). I've never really had any help or instruction from professors, I'm starting to worry about what the 'no hand holding' would be like in grad school. What are the upper and lower limits of classes you can take as a graduate student? I'm asking you guys because somebody affiliated with the school will tell you anything to make sure you hand a check over.
A full time load for a grad student is 9 credit hours... in my school you have about 10 total real classes to complete your degree + some research credits and colloquium credits. I never really used to go to talk to my professors during my undergrad but during grad school I seem to be going to them more often. Sometimes not just for help with the courses, but also for help with my research, or just to hang out.

The 9 hour limit is also very relative, I am doing a Ph.D. so a research is a big part of my degree. In my first semester I took 4 classes + 1 colloquium (14 credit hours) (it was a really bad idea), 2nd semester 2 classes + 3 hours of research ( 9 cr ), the 3rd, 1 class + 6 hours of research, and the 4th, 2 classes and 3 hrs of research. The hours of research are pass/fail and I just have to put them in so I can get to 12 hours. If you were on my PhD program you can get away with taking 1 semester of 3 classes and 3 semesters of 2 classes if you want to. The only thing is that you have to do research all the time. So even though your course load might be lower than you are used to, your advisor, will expect you to get some research done, specially if he's paying for your tuition.
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Old 08-08-2009, 07:59 PM
 
72 posts, read 405,146 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ticky909 View Post
How about some numbers? I'm an undergrad right now and spend a minimum of 60 hours a week on school taking 5 classes (10 hrs in class/50 hrs outside+). I've never really had any help or instruction from professors, I'm starting to worry about what the 'no hand holding' would be like in grad school. What are the upper and lower limits of classes you can take as a graduate student? I'm asking you guys because somebody affiliated with the school will tell you anything to make sure you hand a check over.
In grad school though I wouldn't recommend taking five classes. Three classes is usually considered full time. I didn't spend anymore time studying in grad school than I did as an undergrad, and my GPA was about the same. I would say 6-9 hours outside class on each class if you are trying for an 'A' or 'B'. Less on some because some classes just are easier. Usually you pick from your core classes depending on your major and then you choose some other classes that closely relate to your discipline. At least that was how it was for my master's. Obviously Ph.D. programs are much more detailed.
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Old 08-08-2009, 10:08 PM
 
Location: Bon Temps
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I founds Masters Degree work to be pretty easy...YMMV. It was remarkably time consuming, a lot of writing involved. I graduated with at 4.0... if I remember right my undergraduate GPA was more like a 3.3.


Seems like at graduate level classes, as long as you DO the work, you will make A's...every now and then I have heard of somebody making a B.

I think most of it depends on what you are studying and the university you choose. Mine is in education, admittedly probably one of the easiest programs of study.
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Old 08-08-2009, 10:12 PM
 
Location: southern california
61,288 posts, read 87,413,299 times
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massive student loans, only thing that depreciates faster than a new car.
think employment think debt free think VE, my favorite RN, debt free good pay can be entirely done in jr college.
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Old 08-11-2009, 11:48 PM
 
Location: Living on the Coast in Oxnard CA
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probably depends on the person, school, and dicipline that you are focusing in. That is one thought though, a grad degree is more focused and chances are easier because you are focused on fewer subjects.
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Old 08-12-2009, 01:44 PM
 
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The problem is that some classes that you don't really want to take can be extremely intensive. Choose a class where you can know exactly what is taught during the course. I've found that the little class descriptions are useless. Emailing the professor and reviewing the syllabus are probably the best ways to really know how the class will be taught.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SOON2BNSURPRISE View Post
probably depends on the person, school, and dicipline that you are focusing in. That is one thought though, a grad degree is more focused and chances are easier because you are focused on fewer subjects.
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Old 08-12-2009, 01:49 PM
 
439 posts, read 1,221,604 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by artsyguy View Post
Well in high school you couldn't go crying to your teachers about late work because it was never accepted either. So I don't see why you are making the difference between undergrad (does not accept late work) and grad (does not accept late work).

Basically undergrad and grad work are very similar to each other.
I did the research and found a very good grad program after my first one which seemed like a drawn out episode of the twilight zone. Where lip service and fake smiles hide the poor quality of education.
Look, your experience is your own experience, and mine is mine. I teach undergrads and I get excuses for late work all the time. I don't take most of them, but my coworkers usually do. It depends on where you go.

So, guess what, I'm making that difference between undergrad and grad because it's been...my experience teaching in three different places Don't try to claim my point is invalid because it's different from yours.
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Old 08-12-2009, 02:54 PM
 
25,157 posts, read 53,943,694 times
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I didn't say your experience was invalid. I'm saying don't make it seem like every experience is like yours.

Quote:
Originally Posted by violent cello View Post
Look, your experience is your own experience, and mine is mine. I teach undergrads and I get excuses for late work all the time. I don't take most of them, but my coworkers usually do. It depends on where you go.

So, guess what, I'm making that difference between undergrad and grad because it's been...my experience teaching in three different places Don't try to claim my point is invalid because it's different from yours.
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Old 08-12-2009, 05:55 PM
 
251 posts, read 767,699 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by artsyguy View Post
My undergraduate experience was extremely academic/lecture/research focused. After graduation I did the research to find a graduate school that would be purely academic/student friendly and not some pompous/ostentatious gradate school with burnt out anal-retentive profs to kiss up too, that btw don't want to "hold your hand" as they call it, instead they give you a hard time and the cold shoulder which is what they call an "education". So avoid any places that are like that and stick to interviewing several of the professors and assistants in the department over the phone first before you make any decisions and collect as much information as you can before you enter any graduate school. If they are rude or make you feel weird for probing then move on to another graduate school and continue your interviews. Also don't base everything on rankings alone, you never know what sort of unpleasant surprises await you. Good luck everyone.
if you don't mind me asking, what school is this?
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