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Old 02-14-2010, 08:43 AM
 
Location: West Texas
423 posts, read 794,924 times
Reputation: 269

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Quote:
Originally Posted by NeilVA View Post
Its a dying field in the US. I'm in it and there is no stepping up anymore.
If you were really in it you wouldn't be repeating 8 year old stereotypes that are completely untrue.
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Old 02-14-2010, 09:15 AM
 
6,567 posts, read 13,826,504 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Heimdall View Post
If you were really in it you wouldn't be repeating 8 year old stereotypes that are completely untrue.
I'm in it, and can corroborate some of what he says, but I think it depends where you are employed and with what entity (government, private industry, etc...).

I'm actually trying to get OUT of it and IN to teaching because I just don't find the field personally rewarding.... But that's just me...
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Old 02-14-2010, 09:38 AM
 
5,721 posts, read 5,513,416 times
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It depends what you're specialized in doesn't it? From what I understand networking, working with routers, and working with databases is still good to get in to and a lot of those jobs can't be outsourced can they? Not to mention there will always be a demand for web design....although I admit web design can totally be outsourced.

Technically anything dealing with programming/software can be outsourced except when it comes to something like game design maybe. With game design have a whole team of people designing the game and they have to work together. I would never want to get into nursing I would enter the medical field but only in a job where you don't have to actually deal with the patients, like in a lab or something.

I admit though nursing is probably one of the best things to get into across the board, period. 12 hour shifts, decent pay, decent benefits, job cannot be outsourced EVER, lots of opportunities to move or specialize. Pretty sweet deal imo too bad I have no interest in working with patients. Not to mention if you're a single guy looking you meet a lot of ladies lol.

Last edited by wanderlust76; 02-14-2010 at 09:51 AM..
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Old 02-14-2010, 09:47 AM
 
Location: The Ranch in Olam Haba
23,713 posts, read 29,176,538 times
Reputation: 9985
Quote:
If you were really in it you wouldn't be repeating 8 year old stereotypes that are completely untrue.
Nearly 20 years in IT security. In my location, I watched us go from 1800 people to 60 in one year (most were outsourced to India) That was all the software people. Then the 60 dropped to 18 as the servers were switched to newer systems. Whats left is the 3rd level support level - Those of us who speak American english and can resolve issues that occur outside of the lines (You would have to understand India contracts to comprehend this).

Go find an IBM (or SUN) employee and ask them about what has occurred over the past three years.

If you are in a small location maybe you havent noticed the leaps in technology that have occurred. Just think fiber optic and terabyte storage in relation to the field.

If you want a micro view of it - Go to Staples. They do repairs and the staff is paid about $9/hr.
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Old 02-14-2010, 09:50 AM
 
Location: The Ranch in Olam Haba
23,713 posts, read 29,176,538 times
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Quote:
From what I understand networking, working with routers, and working with databases is still good to get in to and a lot of those jobs can't be outsourced can they?
Sure they can - They are called contract employees. Do a single job, finish it and job is over.
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Old 02-14-2010, 09:56 AM
 
5,653 posts, read 18,710,722 times
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Try NOT to go for a EET bachelors - major corps will not even acknowledge these. As they were OK before back in the 80s but that was before the H1B program ramped up and offshoring initiatives began.

Get a computer science or a electrical engineering degree if you decide to go on further after getting your associates.

Good luck! You may want to check out the govt. occupation outlook handbook online for that industry and get in touch with IEEE association for other info.
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Old 02-14-2010, 10:26 AM
 
5,747 posts, read 11,661,915 times
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I asked my information architect spouse, and he had a few questions...

What kind of IT you want to pursue: infrastructure, development, consulting, sales?
Do you see yourself working in an educational, corporate, or government setting?
What kind of salary and benefits are you hoping to receive when you graduate?
Where do you live now? Are you willing to relocate?
Are you willing to travel? How much?
Would you be comfortable performing contract work?

My husband has a Bachelor's Degree and studied MIS (Management Information Systems), which was popular in the late 80's and early 90's. He has worked in both private industry and for government contractors in several areas of the country. He now works on the private-industry side as a resident consultant and works with a handful of local clients. He travels very occasionally. After twenty years of experience, his salary, including bonus and on-call pay, is well into the six-figures and typical for someone in his role. He works 8-5, but enjoys a great deal of flexibility, and he's on call once a month or so. He does carry a Blackberry and is expected to respond to client emergencies at any time of day or night. Fortunately, they are few and far between. He receives a full benefits package, including medical, dental, an ESPP, stock option grants, 401k, small pension, and tuition assistance.

Last edited by formercalifornian; 02-14-2010 at 11:20 AM..
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Old 02-14-2010, 11:01 AM
 
Location: The Ranch in Olam Haba
23,713 posts, read 29,176,538 times
Reputation: 9985
Quote:
After twenty years of experience, his salary, including bonus and on-call pay, is well into the six-figures and typical for someone in his role.
Correct for 20 years. The OP is looking for $80k out of the door.
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Old 02-14-2010, 11:42 AM
 
5,747 posts, read 11,661,915 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NeilVA View Post
Correct for 20 years. The OP is looking for $80k out of the door.
While not impossible, that's a pretty rare salary for an IT guy right out of school, unless he has work experience and lives in a very high COL area. If you are working in San Jose or New York, $80k won't go very far, even if it seems like a generous salary. Getting that kind of money in the center of the country, where it will buy you a reasonable standard of living, is much more difficult, if not impossible.

Quote:
Originally Posted by wanderlust76 View Post
If you want to enter the IT field what is better a technical college or a regular university? How many certifications should you get and are they more important than a regular college degree? What is better technical college and certifications or a 4 year degree from let's say a public 4 year school w/ certifications?
It really comes down to what kind of job you want to pursue in IT, which offers a variety of paths. Think carefully about the basic questions I posed in my previous post.

In my spouse's job, he often performs client assessments. His job requires high-level technical skills, project management ability, analysis, writing, and public-speaking, and his generous pay rate is a reflection of it. He works with people who have similar technical skills but aren't comfortable with writing and public speaking. They can't demand similar pay. Likewise, my husband can't demand the even higher salaries of people in his position who travel 80% of the time.

You need to get out and talk to people in the IT industry. Find out what they do on a daily basis. When you find something that intrigues you, investigate what kind of education is necessary and pursue it. That said, understand that you can't just finish a degree in information systems and call it good. An IT professional is a consummate student, because the industry is always changing. Another thing to remember is that a really good IT professional is constantly working himself out of his job. You have to be able to stay one step ahead if you want to stay employed.

Last edited by formercalifornian; 02-14-2010 at 12:01 PM..
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Old 02-14-2010, 12:48 PM
 
5,721 posts, read 5,513,416 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NeilVA View Post
Correct for 20 years. The OP is looking for $80k out of the door.
What? Where did I mention a specific salary? I said a good paying job that's subjective and in WV I would never expect to make 80k in any industry. The cost of living is really low here you can buy a mansion for 100k practically. I'm just trying to get a grasp on the career path most people take in the IT field since it seems different than most industries and there's like a million different ways people have jumped into it.
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