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Old 05-21-2010, 05:08 PM
 
Location: Edmond, OK
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Some schools will give you actual credit hours and some will only give advanced placement. One son went in with 17 actual hours. The other son scored well on AP tests, but his university only allowed him to skip to second year courses, no actual hours. For example, he got to skip over freshman composition and go on to literature. He got no credit hours for the freshman english.
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Old 05-21-2010, 07:43 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CaliTerp07 View Post
AP classes do not always adequately prepare students for top colleges.
I agree. In the article I quoted, one student took his first AP class as a freshman. It is ridiculous to assume that a high school freshman can do college level work, so the course gets "dumbed down".

Last edited by Katarina Witt; 05-21-2010 at 07:55 PM..
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Old 05-21-2010, 08:27 PM
 
Location: southwestern PA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
If that's what happened she did get the credit.
.
Nope.
She got NO credit hours.
She just got placed in advanced classes.
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Old 05-21-2010, 11:39 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I agree. In the article I quoted, one student took his first AP class as a freshman. It is ridiculous to assume that a high school freshman can do college level work, so the course gets "dumbed down".
Wholly dependent on what class it is. I had a couple of those math superfreaks who were taking AP Calc in 9th grade at my school. Though I'm obviously talking about the exception, my school didn't allow you to take AP classes until 10th grade.
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Old 05-22-2010, 06:25 AM
 
20,793 posts, read 61,118,536 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I agree. In the article I quoted, one student took his first AP class as a freshman. It is ridiculous to assume that a high school freshman can do college level work, so the course gets "dumbed down".
There are plenty of freshman in high school that can handle a high school AP class. My son is graduating this year and one of his classmates was taking Calculus in middle school and by the time he got to high school was taking a specifically designed math program through the U of M because he was so far beyond what they could teach him in high school. He was recruited by MIT. He was also one of the finalists in the National Chemistry Olympiad a couple weeks ago. There are a handful of kids every year in our high school that are well beyond some high school subjects, usually math, but not always.
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Old 05-22-2010, 07:39 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by golfgal View Post
There are plenty of freshman in high school that can handle a high school AP class. My son is graduating this year and one of his classmates was taking Calculus in middle school and by the time he got to high school was taking a specifically designed math program through the U of M because he was so far beyond what they could teach him in high school. He was recruited by MIT. He was also one of the finalists in the National Chemistry Olympiad a couple weeks ago. There are a handful of kids every year in our high school that are well beyond some high school subjects, usually math, but not always.
A high school AP class that is set up like an honors class yes. But is it really college level work then? Boulder High, referenced in the article, allows freshmen to take AP geography to fulfil the geography requirement of the school district. That is just one example. I can see a handful of kids in a large high school being ready for college level math by high school, as math is one of those courses that doesn't require tons of insight, just ability. I'm not overly impressed by someone being recruited by MIT, as I know a few people who have gone there. Smart, yes. Genius level, no.
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Old 05-22-2010, 09:15 AM
 
Location: Maryland's 6th District.
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Originally Posted by GoPhils View Post
My high school had a program where instead of even having to take the AP Test, you could sign up so basically the AP Course gave you credit like you were taking it at a community college. No crazy AP tests, and still got 14 college credits (which meant I didn't have to take a couple general requirement courses) for 2 high school classes. Not a bad deal.
Uh, 14 college credits for TWO high school classes?


When I was in high school, the school I attended required that a student not only get invited into AP, but also that a teacher in a previous 'lower' level course write a letter of recommendation. I assumed that was standard practice, that students took these courses because they were at that level.

However, after reading numerous posts here on CD, it seems as if many students are enrolling into AP courses (on their own volition, mind you, never mind actual ability) to game college admissions at the most or to get some college credits out of the way at the least. If this is the case, I wonder why any college would accept AP.
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Old 05-22-2010, 09:45 AM
 
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Rejecting AP courses is no more a scam on the part of colleges wanting to collect tuition money, than it is on the part of parents who want to claim their kid is a genius, or by high schools who want to claim accolades for their curriculum and teaching methods.

Truth is, real geniuses don't take AP classes. Wunderkinds finish high school when they are 7 and by the time they are 12 they are sitting in some thinktank solving applied mathematical equations or nuclear fission.

I think its right for colleges and universities to take a more critical look at these AP courses and to reject those that aren't rigorous enough to be considered college level. The students always have the option of taking the CLEP test if a school rejects their AP courses, to get college credit.
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Old 05-22-2010, 10:05 AM
 
Location: On the Chesapeake
45,022 posts, read 60,017,539 times
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The CollegeBoard is working on the "rigor" of AP classes. They started a couple or three years ago requiring schools claiming AP classes to make their AP teachers submit to an audit. What that means is the teacher submits a syllabus/curriculum to CollegeBoard where it's reviewed by college professors. If it's not approved the school can't claim AP status for the class. My system had the Calculus AB syllabus rejected five or six times before it was approved, other courses the same thing.
My understanding is that colleges were starting to see transcripts claiming AP classes when applicants were in 8th grade and AP status for classes for which there was no AP course. This was especially rampant in FL.
What everyone is losing sight of with the push for AP, especially from the CollegeBoard, is the financial piece. They get $76/test (FARM kids get a lower price) and school systems get to claim that xx% of their AP students have taken the test. My system is putting out around $600K this year paying for every student enrolled in AP to take the tests. This is the 3rd or 4th year for that. Problem is the powers that be are now complaining about the preponderance of "1" scores.

Last edited by North Beach Person; 05-22-2010 at 11:33 AM.. Reason: spelling
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Old 05-22-2010, 11:17 AM
 
Location: Edmond, OK
4,030 posts, read 10,723,422 times
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When I was in high school, the school I attended required that a student not only get invited into AP, but also that a teacher in a previous 'lower' level course write a letter of recommendation. I assumed that was standard practice, that students took these courses because they were at that level.


No, it is not the practice everywhere. In both of the high schools my sons attened anyone could sign up for AP courses. And I can tell you that pre AP and AP classes are not the same everywhere. We moved from one state to another while my kids were in high school. The first school they were in had very rigorous AP courses. They were actually taught the way a college course was taught. In second school the AP courses were much easier. They were just glorified high school courses. AP kids usually had to do a few extra assignmnets or something, or they might have to answer an essay question on a test that the other kids, the ones take the non AP level courses might not.

When my son started college he said he was happy he'd been at the first school for a couple of years, because it actully prepared him for college, while the other school didn't.
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