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Old 06-03-2011, 02:34 PM
 
4 posts, read 18,403 times
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My husband and I bought our 1955 home in 2004. We have a basement that has a walk out into a stairwell which goes up and out to our backyard. In the walk out there's a drain and when it rains it catches the water before it comes in the door. Eventually that drain couldn't handle that much water. There's always been a sump pump but it was old and very over worked because of the drain having water continuously. The pump came on about every 15 minutes or so when it rained heavily. About every 30 minutes when all was dry around the clock. After time the concrete always stayed wet even when it didn't rain because the water was coming from under the foundation and the surrounding walls around the stairwell. We started getting water through the floor of one of the bedrooms that is closest to the stairwell. We hired a basement foundation company to fix this in August of 09 and here's what they did. [/font]1. Installed Water Guard sub-floor drainage system in the bedroom that had water coming in through the floor. I'm sure you well know it's pretty much like a trench drain where it is suppose to catch any water coming in and it's along the exterior wall. It didn't work and is useless. 2. Installed a trench drain on inside and out of basement entry. 4. Installed IceGuard to prevent floods from possible freezing discharge line. 5. Remove and re-pour area well at bottom of stairs, after installing new floor drain and drain line to sump pit. Include W/G and T/D wall drains. 6. Bury approx 15' rigid pipe transitioning to perf pipe an additional distance of approx 30' to rear yard. 30"-36: depth as required in rock and cloth bed then backfilled. End. We paid $9,000 for this work and it has only prevented water from coming in the door. At least for the time being. When we get a flash flood sometime which is common the water will still come in due to the design of the slope. After all of this work water now comes in through, not only the floor but also of the foundation wall in my sons room completely ruining the wall. The whole stairwell foundation is crumbling and wet. The bottom step of the stair well has a constant slow stream of water coming out into the trench drain. All of that work made it worse. Our house is falling apart. This is an estimated valued home of $235,000 and now we couldn't give it away if we had to. No one knows what this is. I had the utility company come out and test the water and it is ground water and not utility water. Is it a spring under or around the house and what do we do? We already paid 9 g's and for what? More problems than before. What do we do? No one can tell us what will fix the problem 100% Is my home a total loss? Someone please help![/SIZE]
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Old 06-04-2011, 08:01 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
6,455 posts, read 7,062,969 times
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You have a tough problem. You need to find professional help. A Civil Engineering firm with expertise in hydrology could analyze the problem and propose a fix. At that point you would need to decide if the expense is worth it.

If not, perhaps you should sell. At least you could then present a proposal to a potential buyer.

Good luck. But remember, it's only money. Lots of worse things can happen to you.
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Old 06-04-2011, 10:25 AM
 
11 posts, read 28,260 times
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You really should have paid for an engineer to review the drainage problem before paying so much for what you thought might fix it. If a PE did review and said it was a proper fix, you may want to speak to a lawyer.

No one here really could answer your problem though, we're not in your house, we can't find the source of the water, you don't really explain how much water it is even, that's what you need to do.
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Old 06-06-2011, 08:29 AM
 
2,650 posts, read 1,582,046 times
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Our home in Aurora, Co. had similar problems. When I first moved to the Springs; there was a Ft Carson Soldier who had water problems in the basement. (what a nightmare). He was being deployed to Iraq, and I remember his friends and the city and all kinds of people were working on his dilema. His problem was that the city had not engineered the pipes from the street correctly and they were now re-finishing his basement and re-routing the pipes. ( He was getting the water from the storm drainage in his basement.) I think that may have been my problem in Aurora; we did everything; except call the city. It was a fairly new development.

Now, my Daughter had her crawl space in Thornton, flooded after a major storm, last month in the Denver area. They have lived there over 13 years and no water, ever came in her crawl space. They had a foot of standing water, townhouse next to hers also had water. The utility company (X-Cel energy) had started a project in April, to "enhance" their service. Ha.....they left a hole in her yard for 2 months. When the utility company was contacted about the hole they said "we are still working on it."

The utility company came last week and repaired the hole.....vacuumed gunk out and back filled with gravel.....I think they screwed up. (do you think?) An attorney has been contacted.

Really think an attorney is a good idea. They can sort out the legal jargon and hopefully get you a settlement. What a horrible nightmare. Could there be a natural spring or an old well under your property? Don't give up hope. I did sell my home in Aurora; it is horse property, had something going for it.

Did the city/utility company do an investigation to see about old pipes under your property? Good luck; I know what living with every storm cloud means; every time it would rain I had water, water....
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Old 06-06-2011, 09:28 AM
 
Location: Colorado
486 posts, read 1,388,001 times
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I'm guessing you don't have flood insurance?
You probably already found out that regular home owner's insurance won't cover the damage if it is some type of ground water problem, or something external to your house (as opposed to busted interior plumbing pipes).

I really feel for you!
My parents had a similar problem and are still living with it, even after an expensive professional fix. They are now worried about mold setting up.

If it is something you can't deal with, you may have to sell your home at a major loss. But be sure to disclose all of your basement water issues if you do decide to sell! You don't want that coming back to bite you.

All the best to you!
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Old 06-06-2011, 09:38 AM
 
Location: Colorado
486 posts, read 1,388,001 times
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Just re-reading your post and noticed that the house was built in 1955. Was there any evidence of water damage when you bought it? Did the previous owners disclose any water/foundation movement issues? You should check back on your disclosure documents from when you purchased the house.

If there was no evidence of water seepage in past years, that leaves one to wonder why - 50 plus years later - this problem might suddenly arise.

Was there any water/sewer line work done nearby? Any new irrigation/canal/ditches nearby? New construction subdivisions nearby? Have any of your neighbors installed an in-ground sprinkler system in recent years?

Just some things to consider.
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Old 06-10-2011, 03:07 PM
 
Location: Kalamalka Lake, B.C.
3,441 posts, read 4,673,585 times
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Don't you have a "call before you dig" service in Colorado?
I would do anything before finding out what the problem is; and by that I don't mean taling to a neighbour or contractor.
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Old 06-20-2011, 02:07 PM
 
4 posts, read 18,403 times
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Thanks to everyone for your suggestions. My first question is for VISION. When I choose a Civil Engineer how do I know if they aren't going to screw me over too? I investigated this foundation company and all was good so what then? HYDROSHOCK, as far as hiring an engineer, in the beginning I had no thought whatsoever of hiring one since at the time I knew nothing about it. I have a foundation problem so I called a foundation company. I researched them and all was good. which I now know research isn't anything. They said they could fix the problem and it seemed like a fool proof system they presented to me and I trusted them. So it's not about hiring someone to fix what I "Thought" might fix it, I hired someone to do a job that they told me they could do. I had no doubts at the time. I was actually relieved to get it fixed. So I've really learned the hard way but not for lack of trying on my part. SEESAMEKID My husband and I did carefully read the disclosure when we bought our home. There was nothing in it about any problems. We even hired an inspector before we purchased and we watched him like a hawk to make sure he was doing exactly what he was hired to do. He was very thourough and he found nothing. He pointed out little things here and there but had nothing to do with the basement or water. One year later I was in my backyard and an old woman came out to me and asked how I liked my house. I said fine and she asked, "Have you had any problems with water in your basement yet?" I was stunned and said, "Why would you ask that?" She said that the previous owner had all kinds of problems with that drain at the basement door and was getting water in all the time. Of course I had no problems up until a couple years later. I don't know what he did for a quick fix but it lasted a short while. Also before I spoke with this woman I had pulled up the carpet to replace that was on my stairs leading up to my upstairs from the basement The last two steps had been water damaged but was carpeted so know one knew. I cant say how much damage was done when that guy owned this house but I can't believe someone would sell a home knowing they are putting a huge expensive burden on someone. It's been past 7 years so no legal stuff now. As far as all the questions you asked about recent construction and so on the answer is a no to all of them. Thanks everybody
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Old 06-20-2011, 02:08 PM
 
4 posts, read 18,403 times
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Also I don't know if any of you noticed my photo album with all of my basement photos. Take a look and you can see the problem
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Old 06-20-2011, 04:07 PM
 
Location: Colorado
486 posts, read 1,388,001 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by End of My Rope View Post
Also I don't know if any of you noticed my photo album with all of my basement photos. Take a look and you can see the problem
No, I didn't see a link to an album - but I would love to see the problem!

Why can't you take legal action against the previous owners for not disclosing the issue? Is there a statute of limitations on civil lawsuits?

You should really contact a real estate attorney and find out. I would be furious at the previous owner for not disclosing! Obviously they not only knew about it, but intentionally hid the problem. An inspector is not permitted to start tearing up walls or carpet (unless you are Mike Holmes!) - so it is limited what they can catch during a visual surface inspection.

Start by contacting the realtor you used to buy the place.
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