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Old 05-02-2013, 02:26 PM
 
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Based on some quick math I did using the data from the Association of Religious Data Archives website (The Association of Religion Data Archives | Maps and Reports | Select County Report);

Evangelical Protestant congregational adherents made up approximately 15 percent of the total population of El Paso County in 2010. About 67 percent of El Paso County residents are "Unclaimed."

Contrast this to another large metro/suburban county from a state that really is part of the "Bible Belt": Shelby County, Alabama, where 31 percent of the total population are members of Evangelical Protestant churches/denominations. (Even so, 56 percent of the Shelby County population is "Unclaimed.")

It doesn't get more "Bible Belt", however, than some of the small rural counties of states like Texas. For example, King County, Texas is less than 300 people, but of that number, 90 percent of the population was affiliated with one of the four evangelical Protestant churches there (three Southern Baptist and one non-denominational church.) The remaining 10 percent are "Unclaimed."

My point is simply this: while Evangelical Protestants and their organizations are represented in large numbers in Colorado Springs/El Paso County (and more broadly, Colorado in general), they are by no means the only game in town, religion-wise-or even the biggest, necessarily. It's pretty clear that Colorado has a lot of people from many different religious and faith backgrounds, some more devout than others, and also a lot of people who aren't of any religious faith at all. And you know what? That's just fine.
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Old 05-02-2013, 02:44 PM
gn3
 
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
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See also, this: Poll: Colorado Springs not so religious after all
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Old 05-03-2013, 06:53 AM
 
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I think the natural beauty and libertarian philosophies have resulted in this city having a draw on many people that are less religious. Perhaps at one point it was highly religious, but now it is much more welcoming.
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Old 05-03-2013, 08:40 AM
 
Location: Denver
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Agreed. The influence of organizations such as Focus on the Family and New Life Church on local politics has lessened quite a bit in recent years. I imagine that the area will always remain somewhat conservative politically due to the large amount of military and associated retirees. However most folks (95%+) that you meet out and about town are politically neutral, accepting of all beliefs and quite friendly.
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Old 05-03-2013, 11:20 AM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
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In sheer numbers they might not be as high as it would seem but in terms of who is politically active they are some of the most active people in the Springs. Just look at some of the laws passed by the city and how they tend to handle events like gay pride, the mayor refused to sign a document proclaiming it gay day in the Springs. So in my personal opinion the Springs maintains its position as the bible belt of the west.
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Old 05-03-2013, 12:11 PM
 
812 posts, read 1,342,025 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Josseppie View Post
In sheer numbers they might not be as high as it would seem but in terms of who is politically active they are some of the most active people in the Springs. Just look at some of the laws passed by the city and how they tend to handle events like gay pride, the mayor refused to sign a document proclaiming it gay day in the Springs. So in my personal opinion the Springs maintains its position as the bible belt of the west.
But remember, you dislike Colorado Springs the same way a kid in the high-school marching band finds reasons to dislike the running back on the football team. It makes no difference how smart or how nice the running back actually may be or whether he volunteers to serve food to homeless people in his spare time, the kid in the band will find reasons to hate his guts anyway. This is pretty normal, standard stuff.
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Old 05-03-2013, 02:09 PM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smdensbcs View Post
But remember, you dislike Colorado Springs the same way a kid in the high-school marching band finds reasons to dislike the running back on the football team. It makes no difference how smart or how nice the running back actually may be or whether he volunteers to serve food to homeless people in his spare time, the kid in the band will find reasons to hate his guts anyway. This is pretty normal, standard stuff.
I have reasons for not liking the Springs and one of them is they are so far right and not very tolerant of alternative lifestyles. In my opinion Colorado Springs is as far right as Boulder is as far left and I think being that extreme is not good for any city.
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Old 05-03-2013, 07:10 PM
 
Location: Downtown Co Sps
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Josseppie View Post
In my opinion Colorado Springs is as far right as Boulder is as far left
No. Boulder is extremely liberal and it shows through and through. The Springs having the hard right wing reputation is more myth than actual fact. Your grudge for this town is obviously influencing that statement.
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Old 05-03-2013, 08:01 PM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,240 posts, read 22,579,711 times
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Originally Posted by allprolab View Post
No. Boulder is extremely liberal and it shows through and through. The Springs having the hard right wing reputation is more myth than actual fact. Your grudge for this town is obviously influencing that statement.
Really? I did a google search and found some great examples to back up what I say.

Look at this from PBS:

SAUL GONZALEZ, correspondent: With Pike’s Peak as a backdrop, the citizens of Colorado Springs aren’t shy about telling visitors about what makes their community so special. There’s the U.S. Olympic training center and the United States Air Force Academy, historic neighborhoods with fine old homes, and lots of ways to enjoy a healthy, outdoor lifestyle. However, among many American Christians, Colorado Springs is also known for something else—as an epicenter of evangelical faith and activism. That’s partly because of the high-profile megachurches in the community, but mostly because of the sheer number of national evangelical Christian groups headquartered here. In fact, there are so many Christian groups in this community, Colorado Springs has earned something of a reputation and a nickname: America’s Christian Mecca.

The link: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/religionande...elicals/14792/


The Springs is more to the far Christian Right then many people in the Springs would like to admit.
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Old 05-04-2013, 08:31 AM
 
Location: Downtown Co Sps
666 posts, read 1,159,684 times
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When Ford builds a plant in a new area does that make all the local citizens Ford people? I don't think so. The number of religious organizations doesn't mean the CITIZENS of the town think the same. Is it in favor of the right? Sure, but show me a town that statistically isn't, religiously speaking that is. Is it FAR right? Nope, don't see it.
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