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Old 07-09-2020, 09:40 AM
 
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I am looking forward to the possibility of riding it!
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Old 07-09-2020, 11:11 AM
 
23,288 posts, read 42,640,816 times
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But will there still be DONUTS at the top?
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Old 07-09-2020, 11:31 AM
 
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I guess I wish them luck, but this was by far the most disappointing experience I've had in CO.
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Old 07-09-2020, 12:35 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike from back east View Post
But will there still be DONUTS at the top?
There better be!
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Old 07-09-2020, 08:13 PM
 
Location: Denver CO
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That's nice news!! I don't do very well at high altitude and I'm not sure I'll be taking a ride, as I came thisclose to passing out the two times I've been up there. But it will be a big boost for that whole area, and I'm very happy about that.
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Old 07-10-2020, 09:45 AM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
34,993 posts, read 14,653,329 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by emm74 View Post
That's nice news!! I don't do very well at high altitude and I'm not sure I'll be taking a ride, as I came thisclose to passing out the two times I've been up there. But it will be a big boost for that whole area, and I'm very happy about that.
I know that feeling. I drove up and got to the last point before the final stretch up and decided for safety sake I needed to stop.
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Old 07-10-2020, 05:09 PM
 
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I took the cog railway up about a dozen years ago, I guess -- it was on one of my vacation trips before I decided to move here, anyway. I didn't have altitude sickness, but instead I had motion sickness, which usually never bothers me! Once you get above treeline there are some stretches where there is no visible horizon, and the train climbs so steeply that my inner ear got all confused about which direction was up. Once I got off the train at the top and walked around a bit to admire the views I felt better, but I was relieved to get back below treeline where the vertical growth of the trees allowed the signals from my eyes and inner ear to sync up again.
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Old 07-10-2020, 08:39 PM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
34,993 posts, read 14,653,329 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dr.frog View Post
I took the cog railway up about a dozen years ago, I guess -- it was on one of my vacation trips before I decided to move here, anyway. I didn't have altitude sickness, but instead I had motion sickness, which usually never bothers me! Once you get above treeline there are some stretches where there is no visible horizon, and the train climbs so steeply that my inner ear got all confused about which direction was up. Once I got off the train at the top and walked around a bit to admire the views I felt better, but I was relieved to get back below treeline where the vertical growth of the trees allowed the signals from my eyes and inner ear to sync up again.
Interesting about the vertical trees helping.
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Old 07-27-2020, 04:03 PM
 
Location: Riley Co
303 posts, read 280,203 times
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Default Pike's Peak Cog Railway built by Kansans?

While Googling on the stone "mansion" @ the Tall Grass Prairie Nat'l. Preserve, Strong City, KS, I came upon this:

It is said that Barney Lantry and Sons, a contracting firm in Chase County, KS, became one of the world's greatest contracting firms, and at one time was credited with being the largest supplier of crushed rock and building stone to railroads. The Lantrys had quarries throughout Chase County. The company secured contracts from the Santa Fe Railroad for building stone bridges and laying ballast. They also helped build the Mexican Railroad, and constructed the famous cog line railroad to the summit of Pike's Peak.

RE: the stone ranch buildings/mansion:

The Chase County Leader reported on September 19, 1878, that Jones had started building a residence on the farm and referred to him as the cattle man from Colorado.


August 1878 -

Stephen F. and Louisa Jones moved to Strong City, Kansas in August of 1878. Stephen came from southeast Colorado where he was engaged in a successful cattle operation called the JJ Ranch with his two brothers Jim and Peyton. Shortly after his arrival to Chase County, Jones bought 160 acres along Fox Creek from Jamima Rocker and William M. Langston for $2000. The Chase County Leader reported on September 19, 1878, that Jones had started building a residence on the farm and referred to him as the cattle man from Colorado.

September 1880 -

Jones purchased 1,409 acres of land for $4001 from the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railroad. He also purchased property (from 40 - 1,000+ acres at a time) from individuals, the sheriff of Chase County and the Texas Railroad between 1878 - 1883. He eventually amassed 7,000 acres of land. He had the entire ranch enclosed with 30 miles of five-foot high stone fence to accommodate his cattle operations. On a hill with freshwater springs surfacing, he chose a site for his new home. David Rettiger was contracted to build the house from Cottonwood limestone quarried just two miles south of the building site. In 1881, the three story stone mansion was completed at a cost of $25,000. A short time later, construction of a massive three-story barn and stable was completed, measuring 110 x 60 feet and costing $15,000. He named his estate the Spring Hill Farm and Stock Ranch.


1888, Jones sold the ranch to his partner, Lantry. NOTE: The stone barn was designed to be the biggest in Kansas, however, it was completed shortly after a barn a couple feet larger was finished! No braggin' rights?

FYI: The stocking rate for Flint Hills tall grass pasture is one cow-calf unit/8 acres.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yPzQmvMssmA
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Old 09-11-2020, 05:50 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
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New Cog Railway construction reaches halfway point

https://gazette.com/news/new-cog-rai...965368eb7.html

"Construction on the new Broadmoor Manitou and Pikes Peak Cog Railway is now halfway complete and on track to open to the public next spring.

Crews with San Francisco-based railway general contractor Stacy and Witbeck recently completed construction of the second of three passing siding tracks, marking a milestone in the return of one of the region’s most popular tourist attractions, project leaders said.

The newly reconstructed Mountain View passing siding track is roughly halfway up the 9-mile line at the top of Pikes Peak, which descends almost 8,000 feet down the mountain to its depot in Manitou Springs. In June, crews also completed the passing siding track at Windy Point.

“The crews faced one of the toughest stretches of track to construct between these two points, a part of the line we call the ‘Big Hill,’ which is the longest, steepest, and narrowest portion of track,” Ted Johnston, assistant general manager of the railway, said in a written statement.

Crews are expected to reach the third siding location, Minnehaha, by mid-October.

“Getting to the halfway point is a relief and there’s also a lot of excitement,” Johnston said. “A lot is starting to come together.”

Work began in March 2019 on the $100 million project, which includes renovation of the cog railway’s tracks, cogs, railcars and depots. The project is on budget and on schedule, said Broadmoor spokeswoman Krista Heinicke. Construction is expected to wrap up by the end of the year, with the first cog ride set to take place next May.

Since it began ferrying passengers up the scenic trek to America’s Mountain in 1891, the Cog Railway grew into one of the area’s premier tourist attractions. It carried upwards of 2,300 passengers per day before it closed in late 2017 for winter maintenance.

Aging infrastructure and equipment cast doubt on the railway’s future after owner The Broadmoor hotel in Colorado Springs could not guarantee it would reopen while studying the cost of the rebuild.

But full construction of a new Cog Railway went underway when hotel officials struck a tax-incentive deal with the City of Manitou Springs to help finance the project.

Additionally, four trains are being refurbished in the Cog’s Manitou Springs shop and are 90% complete. They will include new floors, seats, a sound system, vinyl wrap and diesel engines, according to a news release. These four trains are also having their axles converted to the new cog system so they can be placed on the new track.

Three new trains are also in production at Stadler Bussnang, a Swiss company.

Renovation on the Manitou Springs Depot is also moving ahead as construction of new restrooms and a new south platform, which will accommodate the addition of a second track that will make it easier to load and unload trains, begins soon. The renovated depot will also include a new gift shop.

“We are thrilled and really excited to see our train take people up to America’s Mountain,” Heinicke said.

“There’s been a lot of excitement from the community,” Johnston said, adding public feedback on the project has been “overwhelmingly positive.”

To follow the Cog’s progress, visit the railway’s new website at cograilway.com."

see https://www.cograilway.com/
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