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Old 03-15-2020, 05:56 PM
 
1,599 posts, read 966,569 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vision67 View Post
I am impressed that our city has a great supply of water in spite of the drought. People like to attack government, but this example of government planning and foresight shows excellent results. Sure, our water is expensive but it's available.

okay, how much is it per month?


approx. for a 3 bdrm 2bath 1600 sq ft.
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Old 03-16-2020, 03:35 AM
 
Location: Berkeley Neighborhood, Denver, CO USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by frankrj View Post
okay, how much is it per month?
approx. for a 3 bdrm 2bath 1600 sq ft.
It is not the size of your house that matters.
It is the size of your household and the size of your lawn.
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Old 03-16-2020, 07:44 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
3,751 posts, read 3,110,568 times
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https://www.csu.org/Pages/tiered-water-rates.aspx for basic water rates, but as Dave says, your household usage and outdoor landscaping usage will impact this.

Also under customer service tab are links to a variety of other utility costs and fees.
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Old 10-19-2020, 04:42 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
6,256 posts, read 6,731,361 times
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Drought punishes Colorado's reservoir storage

https://gazette.com/news/local/droug...b09d63fc7.html

"Colorado’s reservoirs are 25% lower than they were last year at this time, as a hot, dry summer persists well into the fall.

Statewide reservoir levels are at 84% of average, according to the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service report at the end of last month, well below last year’s mark, when they stood at 112% of average.

The 2020 water year, which began Oct. 1, 2019, and ended Sept. 31, is now Colorado’s third driest on record, trailing behind only 2018 and 2002 for lack of precipitation, according to Peter Goble, service climatologist and drought specialist at Colorado State University’s Colorado Climate Center.

“The water year was certainly drier than average. We finished it out with some pretty startling hot, dry conditions,” Goble said.

Colorado averaged 13.09 inches of precipitation in water year 2020, which was 72% of the 18.01-inch historical average, Goble said.

It was also the 12th warmest year on record, with much of that warmth concentrated in the summer and early fall during a poor monsoon season, Goble said.

August, in particular, was extremely hot — it was the hottest August on record in Colorado since 1895, when record-keeping began.

Colorado’s reservoirs have seen storage levels drop this fall.

Denver Water’s storage system has held up reasonably well this year, thanks to standard watering restrictions and a strong snowpack in 2019.

Denver’s reservoirs are 82% full, not far below the 87% average for this time of year, according to Nathan Elder, Denver Water’s water supply manager.

Since 2002, Denver Water has implemented drought rules that prohibit outdoor watering between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. and encourage residents to water no more than three days a week from May 1 to Oct. 1. The water utility also has tiered rates to encourage conservation.

“We’ve had one of the hottest, driest summers and, despite that, our customers have still been really careful with their water use. We didn’t see extreme demand this year, despite the extreme weather,” said Elder, who added that a strong 2019 water year carried over into 2020 storage.

In the southwestern part of the state, however, reservoir storage levels are much lower. In the San Miguel, Dolores, Animas and San Juan river basins, reservoir storage levels finished September at 59% of average; in the nearby Upper Rio Grande Basin, levels were 67% of average.

Much of the state continues to experience severe, extreme and exceptional drought conditions, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor.

The lack of precipitation, hot temperatures and high levels of evaporation have left Colorado’s soils very dry, which has made winter wheat farming and ranching a challenge, Goble said.

“A number of ranchers across the state have had to sell cattle, and winter wheat for the coming season has had to be drilled in in many locations because the soil moisture is too lacking to plant conventionally,” Goble said.

It has also been a bad year for wildfires, with two of the largest fires on state record — the Pine Gulch and Cameron Peak fires — occurring this year.

The record-breaking snowstorm much of Colorado saw on Sept. 8-9 was helpful, but didn’t ultimately make a big difference for drought conditions, even in places like the San Luis Valley, which logged up to 14 inches in some places.

“It was one of the biggest snowstorms on record in the Alamosa area, regardless of time of year, so it did improve drought conditions in the San Luis Valley, but in an ecosystem that’s so streamflow fed and reliant on seasonal snowpack, it didn’t provide the level of relief that a good seasonal snowpack would,” Goble said.

Looking ahead, climate scientists are forecasting weak La Nina conditions and warmer-than-average temperatures continuing into the fall and winter.

A weak La Niña likely means more snow for Colorado’s northern mountains and less snow for the southern mountains, eastern plains and Front Range, although the exact conditions are hard to predict, Goble said.

“Even a strong La Niña doesn’t guarantee us a good winter in the Northern Rockies,” he said. “We could still see anything from quite dry to quite wet. It tilts the scale a little bit on the wet side for places like up near Steamboat and even Summit County, but it’s not as strong a predictor in Colorado as it is in some other places, like the Pacific Northwest.”

Spring 2021 is likely to be a repeat of last year, with parched soils soaking up more runoff, according to Karl Wetlaufer, a hydrologist with the National Resources Conservation Service.

“It’s very, very dry and we do expect that to carry into the spring and how that affects our streamflow runoff next spring,” he said. “A lot of that snowmelt will be absorbed into the soil structure and may not make it to the streams. If we have a near-normal snowpack again, we would expect less-than-normal runoff with the severe drought that we’re going into winter with.”"
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Old 10-19-2020, 01:16 PM
 
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I am always amazed by how much water city parks and public schools use to keep their lawns and fields green here. Neighbors, too.
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Old 10-19-2020, 01:20 PM
 
23,336 posts, read 42,843,253 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by orngkat View Post
I am always amazed by how much water city parks and public schools use to keep their lawns and fields green here. Neighbors, too.
Agree, and what boggles my mind is that 90% of water used in COLO is for agricultural purposes. Just 10% goes to the cities of which half of that is said to be used for irrigating residential landscapes which means just 5% of water used in COLO is for lawns.
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Old 10-19-2020, 01:34 PM
 
1,604 posts, read 1,166,369 times
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What's even crazier is that most of the water in the CO River ends up in the San Jaquean Desert growing any fruit/veggie you can imagine.
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Old 03-19-2021, 06:35 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
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Opinion: Vegas and Colorado Springs have water in common

John Hazlehurst Mar 19, 2021


https://www.csbj.com/premier/opinion...77f960796.html

"So sorry to have missed the overhyped snow dump last week — we went to Las Vegas. The weather was somewhat chilly, but we enjoyed our vaccinated release from COVID captivity. The plane was full, the streets were thronged with masked multitudes and restaurants were cheerfully busy.

England may have its royal family, but America has Vegas. The royals have palaces, property and rivers of money flowing to an ancient queen and her heirs, while Vegas is vulgar, glitzy, diverse, egalitarian and welcoming — just bring cash!

We took a short, inexpensive and uncomfortable direct flight from the Springs, and headed for the Bellagio’s three-day bargain package. Our room was comfortable enough, although overlooking a dismal industrial landscape behind the hotel.

Like the other mega-hotels along the strip, the Bellagio is a curious beast. Imagine multiple interior tourist destinations, a casino, a hyper-expensive super-mall and floods of gawkers. Employees were without exception cheerful, polite and competent. It’s fun — but remember, you’re just one of thousands of marks, there to smile happily as your money disappears like mist in the desert air.

Can a city of mega-resorts built on gambling, hedonism, greed and gullibility survive? To a casual visitor, the city’s a mirage, an unsustainable mess plopped down in an unforgiving desert. As drought in the West becomes the new normal and Vegas continues to grow, where will the water come from?

We were glad to be back in Colorado Springs. We’re blessed with a diverse, growing economy and enough water to support decades of growth. Compared to Vegas, we’re a paragon of sustainability and common sense… or are we?

Colorado Springs and Las Vegas have one thing in common: dependence on the Colorado River.

“The Colorado River provides water for 40 million people in seven western states, including Colorado Springs residents,” according to the Colorado Springs Utilities website. “The 1922 Colorado River Compact splits those states into Upper Basin (Colorado, Wyoming, New Mexico and Utah) and Lower Basin (Arizona, Nevada and California), and sets the amount of water that must be available to the Lower Basin from the Upper Basin.

How likely is it that we will be asked to relinquish water to shore up supplies in those states? Nearly two decades of persistent drought in the West, combined with historically low levels in their storage reservoirs *— Lakes Powell and Mead — make it a very real possibility … up to 70% of our community’s water supply comes from the Colorado River Basin but, like many other municipalities on the Front Range, our water rights on the western slope were secured after the compact was put in place. Thus, Front Range water providers will bear the brunt of producing water for a curtailment.”

Our city is a verdant oasis, largely irrigated by water imported from the Colorado River. In an arid land, our wasteful ways cannot endure indefinitely. Sooner or later, we’ll have to give up our lawns and radically transform our city. We’ll have to learn from the West’s most sustainable city… yup, Las Vegas.

Vegas relies almost entirely on the Colorado River, but Nevada’s compact allocation is comparatively small. For two decades, the city has paid residents to tear out their lawns, effectively ending private landscape irrigation. All indoor water use is recycled and returned to Lake Mead, radically reducing the city’s consumptive use. That has allowed to the city to grow and thrive without new sources of water.

Could Colorado Springs make a relatively painless transition to lower water use? Let’s start by understanding the biggest water hogs. According to John Entsminger, who heads the Southern Nevada Water Authority, the three largest consumptive uses of Colorado River water are pasture grass, alfalfa, and city lawns. Get rid of the grass, and there are no water supply problems.

Could we grow, prosper and still enjoy our green, tree-shaded city by incentivizing homeowners to replace turf grass with drought-friendly landscaping? Maybe. Vegas started at $1 per square foot, gradually increasing to $3. It’d be a 20-year process, and one sure to be derided by our city’s conservative grandees. Yet if the next 20 years brings multiple Compact calls and compulsory reductions in statewide water use, appropriate planning could save our oasis.

And if not, no worries — I’ll be safely entombed in the no longer Evergreen Cemetery…"
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Old 03-21-2021, 10:00 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
3,751 posts, read 3,110,568 times
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Gotta agree that we should be more aggressive with reducing lawns. Frankly, I can't believe any new development is approved with grass medians, yet they are. Everywhere. I've been working to reduce my lawn area ever since purchasing my home. I've probably cut it back 50% of where it was at the turn of the century.
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Old 03-23-2021, 10:43 AM
 
1,260 posts, read 1,459,829 times
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the average Golf course uses 312,000 gals a day, all the grass for such a little ball. ...
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