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Old 03-19-2021, 05:15 AM
 
4 posts, read 1,491 times
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Moved to The Springs (Falcon area) in November. (7009 ft). I am heading to the doc to make sure I do not have a heart condition since I still cannot sleep without waking up at night and have mucus in my thraot all day and night. I can lift weights and do cardio but I am winded but it does not stop me from completing a good workouit. I went to donate blood and my Hemoglobin was pretty high. Prior to moving, I did not have shortness of breath.

My question: Did any of you experience these type of symptoms that lasted a longer time than usual? Not being able to sleep without gasping for air and having to sleep sitting up? I hear people takee up to three weeks to acclimate, but this has been 4 months. Checking "Dr. Internet” with my symptoms is scaring the crap out of me.

Last edited by FlipFlops1969; 03-19-2021 at 05:49 AM..
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Old 03-19-2021, 05:57 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
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If you have COPD, you might not be able to adapt to the high altitude. Ask your doc about that.
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Old 03-19-2021, 08:07 AM
 
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I have never been diagnosed with COPD and this all started when moving here.
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Old 03-19-2021, 08:18 AM
 
Location: Black Forest, CO
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Definitely a good idea to check with your Dr.
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Old 03-19-2021, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
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There are those occasional persons that do not quickly adapt to the changes in altitude. There are even smaller percentage that never do acclimate. While being physically fit can assist with this process, it is not an indicator of a body's ability to adapt rapidly to altitude.

While a conversation with your doctor about any possible underlying causes is certainly a good idea, it may also require some additional research on your part. There obviously is the possibility that you may take longer than is typical and possibly not adjust at all.
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Old 03-19-2021, 05:45 PM
 
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When I moved here, I suffered from allergies right off the bat. Underwent a couple of years of shot therapy which helped a lot. Still have to take over the counter medicines during certain times of the year.

Last edited by MountShiroi; 03-19-2021 at 06:16 PM..
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Old 03-19-2021, 05:58 PM
Status: "more snow, please ..." (set 27 days ago)
 
Location: Manitou Springs
1,150 posts, read 1,339,771 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FlipFlops1969 View Post
Moved to The Springs (Falcon area) in November. (7009 ft). I am heading to the doc to make sure I do not have a heart condition since I still cannot sleep without waking up at night and have mucus in my thraot all day and night. I can lift weights and do cardio but I am winded but it does not stop me from completing a good workouit. I went to donate blood and my Hemoglobin was pretty high. Prior to moving, I did not have shortness of breath.

My question: Did any of you experience these type of symptoms that lasted a longer time than usual? Not being able to sleep without gasping for air and having to sleep sitting up? I hear people takee up to three weeks to acclimate, but this has been 4 months. Checking "Dr. Internet” with my symptoms is scaring the crap out of me.
Good advice from the other posters - your doctor will be able to run appropriate tests. I'm wondering if you've had a chance to go back to where you moved from, or have been to some other lower elevation area, to see if you have the same issues outside of what's going on here.
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Old 03-19-2021, 06:26 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
27,505 posts, read 45,679,070 times
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What was your previous altitude?

Some people have respiratory limitations and their body is not capable to adapt. My mom had to leave 7,000 ft after 40 yrs there, but does fine at 4000 ft.

As recommended... See your Dr, if you are an American that can afford, or is miraculously provided access to NC.
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Old 03-19-2021, 09:34 PM
 
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I am going to see a DOC, just had a recommendation as we are still new. I have not had a chance to go down to lower elevations to test it all out. I have done a bunch of searches in the forum and found some intertesting insights. I guess we always want to hear that it will be OK and it is a common experience. I dread trying to go to bed tonight. Thanks for the responses.
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Old 03-20-2021, 01:15 AM
 
Location: Scottsdale
1,873 posts, read 1,003,484 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FlipFlops1969 View Post
I have never been diagnosed with COPD and this all started when moving here.
I lived in CO for four years. I studied high altitude physiology in graduate school. One of our projects was to assess the physiological adaptations needed for a person from sea-level to ascend Mt. Everest. You most likely have a lower concentration of alveoli in your lungs to exchange carbon dioxide and oxygen. The Sherpas who are born in the Himalayan Mountains and live there year-round are known for having a much higher concentration of alveoli compared to the average densities for populations from lower altitudes. They hold the ascent records in the region for many of the routes.

So, with lower alveoli and lack of pedigree found among the Sherpas, how does one from sea level adapt to Colorado Springs? If you have already been there four months and still don't feel acclimatized, then it is a concern. You should see a heart specialist. I recall listening to a lecture from an MD/PhD who specialized in pathology at CU Denver. She told the class that, in her opinion, some older people should NOT live at high altitude due to risks in losing homeostasis of blood circulation, pressure, and balance of electrolytes. Respiratory alkalosis can occur if you try to go the tree line on Barr Trail. It sounds like you are better off living in FL or Texas or Phoenix. Maybe even San Diego would be better.

As for me, I am indigenous. I come from a long line of people who are believed to have moved to the southwest via the Rocky Mountains. Other tribes in the region called us "The Mountain People" because we were known for living at high altitude. US Army generals noted our people who served as scouts were unusually fast in mountain running trails compared to their foot soldiers. Sometimes the scouts were on foot while the soldiers were on horseback. In summary, my family pedigree is such that I enjoyed the mountains of Colorado. It only took me about 10 days to acclimatize well enough to make it up Estes Cone (11,000 ft) in less than an hour with 10 lb leg weights despite having come from FL.

But like any other human being, I have limits. My youth is gone. I can't run up mountains that fast anymore. But it was a fun lifestyle back in the day. I miss running up Pikes Peak and the 10 mile run through the Garden of the Gods - great times.
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