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Old 08-04-2009, 05:06 PM
 
6,068 posts, read 8,263,904 times
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Lightning bugs - I've heard there are some along the Highway 50 corridor, but I never saw one until I was in college and had a summer internship in Tennessee - cool! Ugly, but when they light up, beautiful!
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Old 08-04-2009, 05:36 PM
 
Location: CO
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Perhaps off-topic, if so, sorry.

I can't suggest where to live in the Springs if you want to have lots of bird visitors, but if you're interested in birding in Colorado, wherever you live, you must visit The Pawnee National Grassland. It's part of the Central Flyway. . .
Quote:
The Pawnee National Grassland lies 35 miles east of Fort Collins and 25 miles northeast of Greeley in Weld County. Contained within the 30-by-60 mile area are 193,060 acres managed by the Pawnee National Grassland. The rest of the land is a checkerboard of private land, State of Colorado ownership and the Central Plains Experimental Range.

While developed facilities are limited on the grassland, recreation opportunities are not. The Pawnee is an internationally known birding area. It supports many bird species, especially during migration. The Colorado State Bird, the lark bunting, is very common on the grassland in spring and summer. The grassland also has many unique high plains bird species such as the mountain plover, burrowing owl and many birds of prey. Hiking, camping, picnicking, horseback riding and stargazing are also popular activities. Pronghorn, mule deer, coyote, swift fox, snakes and prairie dogs are just a few of the species that make the prairie their home.

The windswept plains have witnessed the pageant of the frontier, the tragedy of the “Dust Bowl” and the wonders of modern agriculture. The rich history of the area is represented by old cemeteries and nearby museums. A person can explore the old homesteads and gain an appreciation of the area’s history. The network of numbered forest service and county roads will take you within easy walking distance of almost all parts of the grassland. A visit to the grassland is unique. Take a moment to experience the abundant wildlife, spring wildflowers and peaceful serenity of the prairie and let your imagination run wild.
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Old 08-15-2009, 08:00 PM
 
Location: Gaylord, MI
21 posts, read 150,035 times
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I know I am a total nerd for doing this, but I LOVE birds and birding and birdfeeding and anything birds. I am trying to revive this post to get more information.

All of you bird lovers out there who put out feeders, etc.:

Can you tell me...

1. If you live IN the city or on the outskirts/mountain areas

2. What type of food you put out

3. What kind of birds typically come to your feeders and yards

4. And if you want, any rare birds and what types have visited you

Thanks for your input!
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Old 08-15-2009, 08:14 PM
 
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I live in Security Widefield. We buy whatever the stores have - my mom prefer's the tidy gardner stuff at Spencer's nursery. We get lots of chickadees, finches, including golden finches lately, jays, robins, doves, starlings, crows, and now orioles, too. In winter I see juncos.
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Old 08-15-2009, 08:20 PM
 
Location: Gaylord, MI
21 posts, read 150,035 times
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Thanks for your input! I feed black oil sunflower seeds and I get goldfinches, rose breasted grosbeaks, house finches, purple finches, white breasted nuthatches, tufted titmice, mourning doves, blue jays, chickadees. At my suet and seed block on the trees I get hairy woodpeckers, downy woodpeckers, red bellied woodpeckers, yellow bellied sapsuckers, red headed woodpeckers, red breasted nuthatches, pileated woodpeckers.

This is of course in northern mich... can't wait to see what I will get in colorado!
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Old 08-15-2009, 09:27 PM
 
Location: Black Forest, CO
1,684 posts, read 2,563,068 times
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I live in northern Black Forest, up on the Palmer divide. Its mostly wooded here, with some open areas.

I have hummingbird feeders out in the warm months and get Broad Tailed and Rufous Hummingbirds, and sometimes an oriole of some sort. I also put out Black Oil Sunflower and get Stellars Jays, Mountain Chickadees, Pygmy Nuthatches, White Breasted Nuthatches, Magpies, Flickers (the western version), Downy and Hairy woodpeckers, crows, occasionally an Eastern Blue Jay or Red Crossbill. Sometimes I put out thistle seed and the Goldfinches and House Finches like it. I also see wrens (not sure what kind) , Rufous Sided Towhees, Juncos, Rose Breasted Grossbeak and Black Headed Grossbeaks, and Great Horned Owls and lots of hawks, but not at my feeder.

Along the roadsides I see Meadowlarks, Horned Larks, Killdeer and a couple different kinds of bluebirds. I have also seen wild turkey every now and then.

I have an ornamental pond and I have had a Blue Heron in it a few times (eating my goldfish!). A Wilson's warbler comes by once in a while, and sometimes I see Western Tanagers. Robins and bluebirds like to bathe in the waterfall.

In the winter I put out suet and get Brown Creepers, Nuthatches, and lots of woodpeckers on the suet.

I had heard a weird sounding bird for a few years and could not identify the sound until recently - it was a common snipe. Makes a weird sound with its wings when diving down. I have never seen it, just heard it.

Some other visitors (not birds) to my yard are turtles, frogs, toads, salamanders, Aberts Squirrels, Fox Squirrels, Raccoons, deer, pronghorns, Porcupines, skunks, red foxes, coyotes, bears, and I heard there was a mountain line roaming nearby - have not seen it luckily. Elk and badgers I have also seen nearby within a few miles of home.

Last edited by beezle1; 08-15-2009 at 09:48 PM..
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Old 08-15-2009, 09:41 PM
 
Location: Gaylord, MI
21 posts, read 150,035 times
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beezle- how far do you have to commute to colorado springs? I was thinking of the black forest area...
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Old 08-15-2009, 09:47 PM
 
Location: Black Forest, CO
1,684 posts, read 2,563,068 times
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Its about a 35 minute commute for me to go about 25 miles. I do live on the far northern end though - the heart of Black Forest is about 10 miles south of where I live so there are plenty of places closer to town. The commute from Black Forest is really not bad at all, except on those days in the winter when we are having a blizzard - I usually just work from home then.
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Old 10-02-2009, 11:35 AM
 
Location: Manitou Springs
1,145 posts, read 1,330,681 times
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There's nothing wrong with feeding them suet - it has lots of benefits:
Feeding Wild Birds: Straight Talk About Suet
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Old 10-02-2009, 02:27 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
235 posts, read 300,682 times
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We’re in the Briargate area near Briargate Parkway and Austin Bluffs – feeders hanging off the deck with either nyjer seed, mainly for the Goldfinch, or no-mess mix for Grackle, House Finch and Harry Woodpeckers. Lots of Doves and Robins do clean-up on the ground.
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Birds, Birding, and Hummingbirds-bird_6_02_2008.jpg   Birds, Birding, and Hummingbirds-faceoff_1.jpg  
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