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Old 07-25-2010, 12:42 AM
 
1,619 posts, read 2,231,426 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nameless View Post
No, saying that it is humid along the Front Range is an outright lie. You couldn't possibly be serious, to have humid conditions at a mile above sea level would be rare and minimal. Does Denver ever have a dew point above 70? I know above 60 is very rare even. Try the 77 dew point we reached last week, then you can say it's not a dry city. Seriously 90 percent of the country is more humid than the front range. Besides, if it were humid your low temperatures would be above 70, all Summer long.
So because we don't have dew points above 70 degrees it isn't humid? Last time I checked, 70 degrees was the borderline between very humid and extremely humid.

Please keep in mind that I am from Nevada, so I am used to dewpoints in the 20s and 30s during the summer. The Front Range routinely has had dewpoint in the 50s and 60s, so of course I am going to feel uncomfortable.

90 percent of the country is NOT more humid than the Front Range. Every other state in the west, with the exception of the coastline, is less humid than the Front Range in the summer. That makes up a little more than 10 percent of the country.

I don't where you pulled this idea that if it were humid our lows would be above 70 degrees. Los Angeles is humid during the summer. They get fog almost every morning. Are their lows ever above 70 degrees? Rarely.
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Old 07-25-2010, 02:27 PM
 
Location: Bourbonnais, IL
1,355 posts, read 3,906,079 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by new2colo View Post
So because we don't have dew points above 70 degrees it isn't humid? Last time I checked, 70 degrees was the borderline between very humid and extremely humid.

Please keep in mind that I am from Nevada, so I am used to dewpoints in the 20s and 30s during the summer. The Front Range routinely has had dewpoint in the 50s and 60s, so of course I am going to feel uncomfortable.

90 percent of the country is NOT more humid than the Front Range. Every other state in the west, with the exception of the coastline, is less humid than the Front Range in the summer. That makes up a little more than 10 percent of the country.

I don't where you pulled this idea that if it were humid our lows would be above 70 degrees. Los Angeles is humid during the summer. They get fog almost every morning. Are their lows ever above 70 degrees? Rarely.
A dew point in the 60s and above is what most would call humid, above 70 would be vary humid. I have rarely even seen it go above 60 in Colorado though. I got that idea that it's not humid due to your lows being below 70 because typically whatever your dew point is in the morning your low will be a few degrees above that. With our dew point of around 70 each morning it's been 73-75 for a low. Even if it's not 10 percent, everywhere east of the front range is more humid which is a hefty chunk of the country. I have been to Colorado every year for the past decade, often during both Summer and Winter and have never detected a hint of humidity whatsoever. I suppose being from Nevada your perspective is different from someone hailing from Florida for instance. I often look at the heat index, it has to be higher than the temperature for me to call it humid, which I can never recall seeing in Denver. Only on a few occasions have I seen it in far eastern Colorado.
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Old 07-25-2010, 02:50 PM
 
22,958 posts, read 42,032,002 times
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We get a few days of humid air and it's cause for a thread with many posts; proving that humidity in CO is so rare it's worthy of mention. Having spent 57 years back east, I certainly noticed it, and grinned in the knowledge that it will be over with soon enough....
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Old 07-25-2010, 02:54 PM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,222 posts, read 22,091,541 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nameless View Post
A dew point in the 60s and above is what most would call humid, above 70 would be vary humid. I have rarely even seen it go above 60 in Colorado though. I got that idea that it's not humid due to your lows being below 70 because typically whatever your dew point is in the morning your low will be a few degrees above that. With our dew point of around 70 each morning it's been 73-75 for a low. Even if it's not 10 percent, everywhere east of the front range is more humid which is a hefty chunk of the country. I have been to Colorado every year for the past decade, often during both Summer and Winter and have never detected a hint of humidity whatsoever. I suppose being from Nevada your perspective is different from someone hailing from Florida for instance. I often look at the heat index, it has to be higher than the temperature for me to call it humid, which I can never recall seeing in Denver. Only on a few occasions have I seen it in far eastern Colorado.
Compared to the east Colorado is not humid at all but comparing Colorado to Colorado we have days that seem humid to us and that is what most of us are referring to when we say its been humid here.
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Old 07-25-2010, 03:25 PM
 
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Yes, we have more dry days then humid, that`s why when the humidity goes up, it`s easily felt.
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Old 07-25-2010, 04:31 PM
 
Location: Greenwood Village, Colorado
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Can't believe someone is complaining about the humidty in Colorado. That's as silly as the nitwits from Dallas claiming it's not really humid or hot there.
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Old 07-25-2010, 04:48 PM
 
Location: CO
2,713 posts, read 6,313,296 times
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Out of curiosity, I just checked temperature and humidity at the NOAA (National Weather Service) site.

At 3:40 PM on Sunday, July 25:

Three Colorado cities:

Boulder
86º
25% humidity

Denver
87º
29% humidity

Grand Junction
95º
17% humidity

Then, Arizona and Nevada:

Phoenix
106º
20% humidity

Las Vegas
108º
12% humidity

Yes, it's "more humid" here. It's also slightly cooler. When it heats up, it get drier. In the mornings, when it's cooler, it's more humid. When it's raining, or right before rain, it's also more humid.

But, no matter, it's still pretty dry overall here. And notice, this afternoon, Grand Junction is both cooler and less humid than Phoenix. Right now, Las Vegas wins for hottest and driest.
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Old 07-25-2010, 05:28 PM
 
11,715 posts, read 37,383,396 times
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Don't forget Colorado's lower air pressure. 40% RH air in Colorado feels less thick than it does at sea level.
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Old 07-25-2010, 06:12 PM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
13,694 posts, read 26,305,512 times
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Around 10pm, we've had some nights where it has been 77°F-82°F with 60°+ dewpoints.

On the grand scheme, it hasn't been humid, but so far this has been the most humid summer I've spent in CO.
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Old 07-25-2010, 06:57 PM
 
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David, It does seem like it has been more humid this summer.
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