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Old 03-08-2014, 09:25 PM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
33,222 posts, read 13,957,666 times
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Just so you don't think I'm totally negative, there are many beautiful places in Pennsylvania, also.
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Old 03-08-2014, 09:52 PM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,794 posts, read 17,544,973 times
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phetaroi wrote: Just so you don't think I'm totally negative, there are many beautiful places in Pennsylvania, also.

Too many to count! Pennsylvania is a really beautiful state, but unfortunately it is also a very toxic one.
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Old 03-15-2014, 03:08 PM
 
2,253 posts, read 6,355,236 times
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Wink Next Generation?

“Flowback will contain the chemical additives used during hydraulic fracturing; thus, flowback is an industrial wastewater that requires proper treatment and/or disposal,” according to Cornell University’s Water Resources Institute. “In addition to chemical additives, flowback water will also contain chemical constituents associated with the shale,” which may include high levels of salt, metals, organic compounds, and naturally occuring radioactive materials (NORM).

Filter socks are used to capture the solids in flowback water.'
[1]




Radiation in the form of such as thorium, uranium and radium can be naturally occurring in Colorado water. Enter the company Next Generation Solutions to the act, and at the Colorado Rural Water Assocation in Colorado Springs to suggest various ways to treat municipal water to avoid these substances.[2] If also, it would seem, helping to introduce them into this state.

Radioactive material is one byproduct of fracking. Water returned in the process is habitually contaminated with heavy metals and radiation in the form of such as radium. Filter socks are used to filter this water, but then the rather large problem of how to dispose of them. These 'socks' are similar to common tube socks, being about 10 inches in diameter and three feet long. And, once used, usually beyond the radiation levels that dump sites will accept.

This is a huge problem in North Dakota, with a lot of fracked oil—and a lot of refuse nobody wants. Oil company majors, apparently following best environmental practices (and not shy in publicizing it), seem to have found a convenient solution in sub-contractors who can be less fastidious in their practices. North Dakota has largely kept these used filter socks out of municipal trash dumps by installing geiger counters at the entrances, to forestall dumping. But these radioactive filter socks have begun popping up elsewhere, all over the place. At least 30 at the Fort Berthoud Reservation of Indians. 250 in a container near New Town. 100 in a Williston, ND garbage can. Melting snow revealed "a large sack of them" by the roadside near Tioga that seemingly 'fell' off a truck.[3]

As trucking out a container of such waste and disposing of it properly(?) can cost $8,000, Kurt Rhea, CEO of Colorado-based Next Generation Solutions, guesses that maybe 20 percent of North Dakota's radioactive waste is being disposed of properly.

Although part of Next Generation's solution is apparently to let Colorado help in trucking this radioactive waste for disposal here. North Dakota helpfully provides a flyer to waste haulers suggesting where they might go. The only ones listed that accept radioactive waste are in South Dakota, Texas, and Colorado.

While fracking operations in this state surely result in radioactive waste of their own, we apparently can benefit (or at least someone, anyway) from this enterprise in other states.




1) 'Strange Byproduct Of Fracking Boom: Radioactive*Socks,' Forbes
Strange Byproduct Of Fracking Boom: Radioactive Socks - Forbes

2) 'Next Generation at the Colorado Rural Water Assocation Conference,' Next Generation Solutions
Next Generation Solutions - 2/2 - Radioactive Waste Disposal

3) 'Fracking's radioactive sock hop,' Shale Reporter
Fracking's radioactive sock hop - Shale Reporter : Suzie Gilbert
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Old 04-07-2014, 05:11 PM
 
22,958 posts, read 42,027,150 times
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Default Oklahoma Swamped by Surge in Earthquakes Near Fracking

Oklahoma Swamped by Surge in Earthquakes Near Fracking, says an article in Bloomberg today.

Excerpt: "There have been more earthquakes strong enough to be felt in Oklahoma this year than in all of 2013, overwhelming state officials who are trying to determine if the temblors are linked to oil and natural gas production. The state last night experienced its 109th earthquake of a magnitude 3 or higher, matching the total for all of 2013, ..."
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Old 04-07-2014, 06:31 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 27,049,523 times
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Those of us who were around in Colorado in the early to mid-1960's remember the Denver earthquakes whose origins were traced to the deep wastewater injection well at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal. As soon as the water injections stopped, so did the earthquakes. History may not repeat, but it rhymes.
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Old 04-08-2014, 10:18 AM
 
3,491 posts, read 5,349,423 times
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I wish those articles would have used more valuable statistics instead of the over simplified easily digestible by morons but statistically irrelevant numbers. The total for 2013 as a guide is fairly useless until we know the mean and the standard deviation. What was the likelihood of recording this number strictly by chance? If we can determine that the likelihood was under 5% because every other year the number occurring by the start of April was under 50, then this would be an enormous event.

I suspect we will find this to be a case of privatized profits and socialized costs.
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Old 04-08-2014, 12:55 PM
 
2,253 posts, read 6,355,236 times
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Wink Geological reminders

'Speaking with Reuters, seismologist Austin Holland of the Oklahoma Geological Survey said that not even four months into 2014, the state has already experienced more earthquakes (252) than it did the entirety of 2013 – itself a record-breaking year with 222 quakes recorded.' [1]



I'd just heard much the same thing about unseemly earthquakes in Oklahoma (being one of several states so afflicted), but desisted in saying anything.

No idea on what the standard deviation might be on such things, but seat of the pants works fine for me. The USGS has noted that between 1975 and 2008 that Oklahoma experienced 3 or fewer earthquakes annually. Between 2009 to 2013 that number has risen to about 40 per year. Meanwhile, in 2011 there was a six-fold increase in earthquake activity across the United States, compared to the year 2000. This would suggest to most that something is going on. Exactly what is still be determined. But especially in states like Texas and Oklahoma, when one observes a significant increase in earthquakes in association with heavy local fracking activities, one might suspect certain parallels. Something to look into more closely—rather than blithely accept oil industry and government propaganda that everything is okay.

BTW, Oklahoma is now the second most seismically active state in the US, only after California. The intensity of these earthquakes has also risen, to the degree that now some are causing not insignificant property damage.

While Colorado's geology is different, it is not necessarily immune to such [possibly] fracking-induced earthquakes. Ohio, Texas, Arkansas and Colorado have all experienced 'earthquake swarms.' This is where a local area experiences many earthquakes in a relatively short period, although that might be over days, weeks or months. They are different from the smaller 'aftershocks' experienced after a large earthquake, as no larger earthquake preceded them. Trinidad, CO is one place where this has occurred.

As for those possibly complaining about some of these references—never mind. If not liking a particular source, go find your own. That will have the multiple benefits of one finding that there are various angles on the same underlying data, that this data and circumstances do exist, possibly learning something extra in the process—and leaving me alone.



1) 'Oklahoma breaks record with hundreds of earthquakes after fracking intensifies,' RT
http://rt.com/usa/oklahoma-earthquak...-fracking-961/

2) 'Fracking and earthquakes: Scientists link rise in seismic activity in Oklahoma to increased oil and gas exploration,' The Independent
Fracking and earthquakes: Scientists link rise in seismic activity in Oklahoma to increased oil and gas exploration - Americas - World - The Independent
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Old 04-08-2014, 07:34 PM
 
Location: Littleton, CO
3,134 posts, read 5,304,532 times
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There is no doubt that fracking can cause earthquakes.

There are several (pre-fracking) documented instances in which human activity induced earthquakes. The injection of fluids deep into the earth's crust has been known to trigger seismic events. Such was the case in Colorado during the 1960s when waste fluids were injected into a bore hole at Rocky Flats.

Commerce City experienced a similar earthquake "swarm" that ended when the deep injection was discontinued.
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Old 04-08-2014, 10:10 PM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,794 posts, read 17,544,973 times
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With regard to earthquakes and fracking, read Ken Folletts novel, The Hammer Of Eden
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Old 04-09-2014, 09:34 AM
 
432 posts, read 477,842 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Idunn View Post
'The Bush administration invaded Iraq—at the direct cost of many hundreds of thousands of Iraqi lives, as well over 4,000 American—for oil. Mister darkness himself, Dick Cheney,
wow, from all the mis/disinformation on here about fracking and the heavy dose of left wing political hatred and propaganda, shouldn't this thread be in the political section?
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