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Old 11-18-2010, 10:08 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brandon Hoffman View Post
I disagree with the above posters that Lex and NE are essentially the same. To me, Lexington has much more of a small town feel to it than NE Columbia which is very busy in my opinion. You also have a lot of relocations in NE Cola, which isn't a bad thing, where as Lexington is more local, which also isn't a bad thing. NE Cola has more shopping and establishments and is a bit faster paced. Lex is a little more laid back and has more outdoor and lake opportunities. Of course, Lugoff-Elgin is just outside of NE Columbia now, so you may want to check there as well.
Perhaps I should clarify. I would agree that they are not necessarily "essentially the same". Depends what part of Lexington & NE Cola you are comparing. I consider Blythewood to be in the general NE Cola area, so that might be more comparable to Lexington because of the more suburban-rural mix, rather than the more purely suburban neighborhoods found in the more established NE areas.

To that extent Lexington is slightly "newer" to NE Cola overall, but not in comparison to, say, the Blythewood area of NE Cola. For example, there is really no "Spring Valley" or "Wildewood" (two prominent established neighborhoods of the NE) equivalent in Lexington (i.e., large, upscale master-planned communities of 1980s-1990s vintage). On the other hand there are newer neighborhoods in the Lexington area like Lake Frances which would look completely at home in the outer, newer portions of the NE.

Lugoff/Elgin is to my mind comparable to perhaps Gilbert, which is the small town/rural area west of Lexington and with little if any significant suburban development.
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Old 11-18-2010, 10:14 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hschigel81 View Post
I guess to us the traveling doesn't matter because we both do it now ... he travels 20-30 minutes to work and I travel 45 minutes to an hour to work depending on traffic. It's pretty customary around here (Cleveland, Ohio) for people to drive into work from all over the place. We just want to be in the best area to raise our family as I will be staying home. It's no big deal to us to have to travel 25 minutes to work. Thanks for all the input!! I really appreciate it!! Still thinking we are leaning towards living in Lexington ... seems more my speed.
I think if you decide you want to be in Lexington it isn't necessarily a "bad" decision. I would only suggest that you look into Northeast Richland and "test drive" both commutes to see if you feel it is worth the trade-off. As I said in my "clarification" post, you might find some portions of Lexington a bit more rural than the more established parts of the NE, but there is the Blythwood area in the NE up I-77 and would give you a comparable environment to Lexington. There are plenty of people who live in Lexington and commute to the NE (I've known a few myself) - I would just look into seeing if the NE is an option for you if you are moving in from out of state.

I would say about the only big amenity in Lexington that's different is having Lake Murray at your doorstop - the NE only has smaller lakes that are self-contained in specific subdivisions or developments. I will say that the NE is ahead of Lexington in terms of retail development, but the US 378 corridor between Lexington and West Columbia is quickly filling in because of old family land-holders selling their properties to developers.

Also, Brandon is right that there are fewer transplants in the Lexington area compared to the Northeast - the Northeast also has a huge military presence due to the nearby location of Fort Jackson on the eastern side of Columbia. However, there are many transplants in Lexington as well, and as an Ohioan you wouldn't necessarily feel out of place in Lexington.
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Old 11-18-2010, 12:59 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chi2Midlands View Post
I think if you decide you want to be in Lexington it isn't necessarily a "bad" decision. I would only suggest that you look into Northeast Richland and "test drive" both commutes to see if you feel it is worth the trade-off. As I said in my "clarification" post, you might find some portions of Lexington a bit more rural than the more established parts of the NE, but there is the Blythwood area in the NE up I-77 and would give you a comparable environment to Lexington. There are plenty of people who live in Lexington and commute to the NE (I've known a few myself) - I would just look into seeing if the NE is an option for you if you are moving in from out of state.
Definitely agreed. Never hurts to look.
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Old 11-18-2010, 08:55 PM
 
Location: Columbia, SC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chi2Midlands View Post
Perhaps I should clarify. I would agree that they are not necessarily "essentially the same". Depends what part of Lexington & NE Cola you are comparing. I consider Blythewood to be in the general NE Cola area, so that might be more comparable to Lexington because of the more suburban-rural mix, rather than the more purely suburban neighborhoods found in the more established NE areas.
I know what you're getting at but I still don't agree. I'm from here, family in both areas, and I'm in both areas regularly. Lexington is a little more country/small town.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chi2Midlands View Post
To that extent Lexington is slightly "newer" to NE Cola overall, but not in comparison to, say, the Blythewood area of NE Cola. For example, there is really no "Spring Valley" or "Wildewood" (two prominent established neighborhoods of the NE) equivalent in Lexington (i.e., large, upscale master-planned communities of 1980s-1990s vintage). On the other hand there are newer neighborhoods in the Lexington area like Lake Frances which would look completely at home in the outer, newer portions of the NE.
I think it's the reverse. With Sandhills and all the development in NE Columbia I'd say NE is newer. Lake Frances was the same developer as Lake Carolina so it's not surprising that it reminds you of NE Columbia. The difference is it's in South Congaree vs. being located off Hardscrabble. Lexington has it's own upscale communities. I'd say Governors Grant actually is comparable to Wildewood. They also have Spence's Point, Pilgrims Point, Brandon Pass, Martins Crossing, Golden Hills, Secret Cove and other high end communities.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chi2Midlands View Post
Lugoff/Elgin is to my mind comparable to perhaps Gilbert, which is the small town/rural area west of Lexington and with little if any significant suburban development.
Agreed, though you may be surprised at the amount of people that move to those areas and commute to Columbia to work.
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Old 11-19-2010, 11:19 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brandon Hoffman View Post
I know what you're getting at but I still don't agree. I'm from here, family in both areas, and I'm in both areas regularly. Lexington is a little more country/small town.

I think it's the reverse. With Sandhills and all the development in NE Columbia I'd say NE is newer. Lake Frances was the same developer as Lake Carolina so it's not surprising that it reminds you of NE Columbia. The difference is it's in South Congaree vs. being located off Hardscrabble. Lexington has it's own upscale communities. I'd say Governors Grant actually is comparable to Wildewood. They also have Spence's Point, Pilgrims Point, Brandon Pass, Martins Crossing, Golden Hills, Secret Cove and other high end communities.


Agreed, though you may be surprised at the amount of people that move to those areas and commute to Columbia to work.
So would you say Blythewood is not as country/small town as Lexington? My understanding and "feel" for Lexington is that as the county seat, it feels like a fairly big small town (bigger than Blythewood) surrounded by assorted suburban-style subdivisions. To the extent that the NE is now pretty much wall-to-wall suburban subdivisions, I'd agree that Lexington is more country, since the subdivisions there definitely feel spread apart with a lot of traditional "country" areas in between. There are definitely areas with a Lexington zip that wouldn't look out of place in rural Lower Richland - those areas much harder to find in the NE unless you go past the developing portions of Blythewood or into Kershaw County.

I'm not as familiar with Lexington's upscale neighborhoods, so thanks for pointing those out. I had heard of Governor's Grant, FWIW - regardless I should have done some more homework. Especially with Lake Murray being such and upscale draw.

As to the NE being newer - I can see that, I suppose - but it's definitely denser - not quite as much as the Harbison area, but definitely more so than Lexington. Also, my familiarity with Lexington is mostly along US 378 east of town and coming in from Irmo over the dam, which probably gave a false impression of Lexington being further along the suburbanization/densification path than what it really is.

I'm not at all surprised how many folks commute from that far away. I know of people who commute from Prosperity and Camden to downtown. I even had a co-worker commute from the Heath Springs area near Lancaster to Columbia!
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Old 11-19-2010, 02:01 PM
 
Location: Lexington, SC
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Before you decide between NE Columbia and Lexington, read this thread here in city data

//www.city-data.com/forum/colum...lose-home.html
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Old 11-21-2010, 09:21 PM
 
Location: Columbia, SC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chi2Midlands View Post
So would you say Blythewood is not as country/small town as Lexington?
...
As to the NE being newer - I can see that, I suppose - but it's definitely denser - not quite as much as the Harbison area, but definitely more so than Lexington.
In a different way it is and it isn't. NE Columbia has changed the perception of Blythewood. I consider Blythewood to essentially being part of NE Columbia now.

As to the second part, NE Columbia is actually the most populated part of the Columbia area. Irmo/NW Columbia is quite small in comparison to NE Columbia.
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Old 11-23-2010, 11:53 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brandon Hoffman View Post
In a different way it is and it isn't. NE Columbia has changed the perception of Blythewood. I consider Blythewood to essentially being part of NE Columbia now.

I would pretty much agree with this - the lines between "Columbia" and Blythewood have been blurring. Where I live the zip code boundaries for Blythewood, Columbia, and Elgin converge. Out in the Northeast it has become more about neighborhood/subdivision rather than town/county/zip code.

As to the second part, NE Columbia is actually the most populated part of the Columbia area. Irmo/NW Columbia is quite small in comparison to NE Columbia.
I can see this, too, although I was talking about density, not total population. At the very least, the Harbison corridor feels significantly denser than the Two Notch Road corridor (roughly from Village at Sandhill down to about I-77), but the Harbison is much smaller/shorter, too.

Moving past Harbison past I-26, even though there are many new homes in the Dutch Fork area, things do peter out towards Chapin. I don't get the same feeling of things petering out towards Blythewood or Elgin. Partially I think this is because there is more commercial/light industrial development and potential development up I-77 and out east on I-20. I sense that in the Chapin area it's a different vibe with local folks wanting to keep the semi-rural feel along Lake Murray.
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Old 11-23-2010, 04:54 PM
 
Location: Columbia, SC
10,894 posts, read 21,851,140 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chi2Midlands View Post
I can see this, too, although I was talking about density, not total population. At the very least, the Harbison corridor feels significantly denser than the Two Notch Road corridor (roughly from Village at Sandhill down to about I-77), but the Harbison is much smaller/shorter, too.

Moving past Harbison past I-26, even though there are many new homes in the Dutch Fork area, things do peter out towards Chapin. I don't get the same feeling of things petering out towards Blythewood or Elgin. Partially I think this is because there is more commercial/light industrial development and potential development up I-77 and out east on I-20. I sense that in the Chapin area it's a different vibe with local folks wanting to keep the semi-rural feel along Lake Murray.
Ditto.
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