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Old 06-07-2015, 05:47 PM
 
1 posts, read 2,135 times
Reputation: 10

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After reading this article Moderator cut: link removed, please read the Terms of Service I started thinking about Columbus as a possible place to relocate. I currently live just outside Washington DC. This is a great city but it's just too dang expensive! I've been ready to leave for a long time but can't find a suitable place for relocation.

I'm wondering if Columbus would be a good fit for me. I know one person in all of Ohio: a girl I was in the military with who now lives in Powell. I'm physically aged 36 but mentally I'd say I was 25. Yes, I go to work everyday and pay my bills like a good little girl, but I still want to party every night (probably because I didn't get enough love as a child, or some other psychological reason). I enjoy an active nightlife. I like theater and museums and dining out and good wine. These are important to me.

On a more important note, I'm more concerned about cost of living. This article points out Columbus's cost of living is very low. Rents are so cheap compared to DC. I'd kiss your feet if I could rent a two bedroom for $1000. I currently pay almost $2000 a month for a closet WITHOUT utilities. So, I could score a 'cheap' apartment in Columbus but what about salaries? I have a MA in English (almost worthless, I know), and I'm a tech writer making about $85K. Could I make relatively the same in Columbus? Or would I have to take a huge pay cut, resulting in the same hand-to-mouth existence that I live in DC? I hate these articles that talk about low rent and low cost of living but then the wages are also low. It seems like it would be the same, if you calculated it proportionally.

So, for a 36 year old black female with an 'advanced' degree, would I mesh with Columbus? Could I be well employed? What area of town should I consider? Obviously, I'd want to be urban as possible. I want walkability of the neighborhood. I would not want to commute to a good job, but after living in DC, anything else would be a cake walk. I'm a New England Patriots fan (since the 90s, thank you) but I could learn to like the Buckeyes. Even though I'm originally from Florida, I never bothered with college ball. I'm even considering applying to THEEEEE Ohio State's law school, because I have a ton of money from the military to use for education. I also love winter (the more snow, the better).

I plan to visit in October when that aforementioned military friend gets married.

I'm to the point where I feel almost desperate to leave DC. A normal person would think $85K is enough to be happy but in this area it's just not enough. I tell my friends here I'm thinking about Ohio and their opinion is that it's some culturally devoid backwater. I looked at various statistics and on paper Columbus seems okay. I appreciate any insight anybody can provide.

Last edited by Poncho_NM; 06-23-2015 at 11:40 AM..
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Old 06-08-2015, 01:31 PM
 
417 posts, read 487,471 times
Reputation: 408
You could do well on that salary but find a job first. Honestly, I feel like everyone in Cbus is married with kids in the 30 and above age group. Its great for people in their 20s. The col is definitely better than DC.
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Old 06-19-2015, 11:19 AM
 
1 posts, read 1,917 times
Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by WorfsBabyMama View Post
After reading this article[mod]link removed, please read the tos[/mod]I started thinking about Columbus as a possible place to relocate. I currently live just outside Washington DC. This is a great city but it's just too dang expensive! I've been ready to leave for a long time but can't find a suitable place for relocation.

I'm wondering if Columbus would be a good fit for me. I know one person in all of Ohio: a girl I was in the military with who now lives in Powell. I'm physically aged 36 but mentally I'd say I was 25. Yes, I go to work everyday and pay my bills like a good little girl, but I still want to party every night (probably because I didn't get enough love as a child, or some other psychological reason). I enjoy an active nightlife. I like theater and museums and dining out and good wine. These are important to me.

On a more important note, I'm more concerned about cost of living. This article points out Columbus's cost of living is very low. Rents are so cheap compared to DC. I'd kiss your feet if I could rent a two bedroom for $1000. I currently pay almost $2000 a month for a closet WITHOUT utilities. So, I could score a 'cheap' apartment in Columbus but what about salaries? I have a MA in English (almost worthless, I know), and I'm a tech writer making about $85K. Could I make relatively the same in Columbus? Or would I have to take a huge pay cut, resulting in the same hand-to-mouth existence that I live in DC? I hate these articles that talk about low rent and low cost of living but then the wages are also low. It seems like it would be the same, if you calculated it proportionally.

So, for a 36 year old black female with an 'advanced' degree, would I mesh with Columbus? Could I be well employed? What area of town should I consider? Obviously, I'd want to be urban as possible. I want walkability of the neighborhood. I would not want to commute to a good job, but after living in DC, anything else would be a cake walk. I'm a New England Patriots fan (since the 90s, thank you) but I could learn to like the Buckeyes. Even though I'm originally from Florida, I never bothered with college ball. I'm even considering applying to THEEEEE Ohio State's law school, because I have a ton of money from the military to use for education. I also love winter (the more snow, the better).

I plan to visit in October when that aforementioned military friend gets married.

I'm to the point where I feel almost desperate to leave DC. A normal person would think $85K is enough to be happy but in this area it's just not enough. I tell my friends here I'm thinking about Ohio and their opinion is that it's some culturally devoid backwater. I looked at various statistics and on paper Columbus seems okay. I appreciate any insight anybody can provide.
I'm 37. I grew up in the nyc area, lived in los angeles for 10 years and now lived in columbus for 6 years. I used to party in DC a lot in the late 90's when I was going to school in philly. short answer, columbus is not the most exciting place to be for single thirty somethings. Not anywhere near as many options as in DC/MD/VA metro. like me, most people are married with kids in that age range. its hard for my wife and I to find social gatherings and a nightlife scene that isn't flat out bad or for people in their early to mid twenties. If you do like to party like a 23 year old and with 23 year olds there are some options. There are a lot of recent Ohio State grads that stick around for a few years before they leave or get married off. On the flip side there also seems to be a small group of late thirties to forties up and divorced people finding a place on the social scene.
The cost of living is so much lower than DC. You could get a great place for $1000/month. My mortgage is less than your rent for our 3000 sq ft home in Gahanna. So thats a huge plus. The east and northeast suburbs are the most diverse and integrated. Gahanna and westerville each have little walking areas that have restaurants and such but the suburbs are 99% families. People with no kids seem to prefer the german village, short north and grandview areas that are in or close to downtown Columbus. Lots more to walk to in terms or restaurants and boutiques. A more eclectic and hip feel down in those places as well.
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Old 06-20-2015, 08:59 AM
 
Location: Phoenix
1,277 posts, read 4,290,852 times
Reputation: 701
Quote:
Originally Posted by NY2LA2OH View Post
I'm 37. I grew up in the nyc area, lived in los angeles for 10 years and now lived in columbus for 6 years. I used to party in DC a lot in the late 90's when I was going to school in philly. short answer, columbus is not the most exciting place to be for single thirty somethings. Not anywhere near as many options as in DC/MD/VA metro. like me, most people are married with kids in that age range. its hard for my wife and I to find social gatherings and a nightlife scene that isn't flat out bad or for people in their early to mid twenties. If you do like to party like a 23 year old and with 23 year olds there are some options. There are a lot of recent Ohio State grads that stick around for a few years before they leave or get married off. On the flip side there also seems to be a small group of late thirties to forties up and divorced people finding a place on the social scene.
The cost of living is so much lower than DC. You could get a great place for $1000/month. My mortgage is less than your rent for our 3000 sq ft home in Gahanna. So thats a huge plus. The east and northeast suburbs are the most diverse and integrated. Gahanna and westerville each have little walking areas that have restaurants and such but the suburbs are 99% families. People with no kids seem to prefer the german village, short north and grandview areas that are in or close to downtown Columbus. Lots more to walk to in terms or restaurants and boutiques. A more eclectic and hip feel down in those places as well.
Yes if you want the young professional life then the areas of downtown and the central city are the places to live in Columbus. I will say in just the last three years Columbus has experienced even more growth in nightlife options in these areas. Also Columbus has long been one of the younger cities in the Midwest northeast in terms of demographics, but brain drain has greatly reversed there increasing the number of late 20 something's remaining and fueling a huge central city apartment/housing boom.
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Old 06-20-2015, 05:32 PM
 
Location: MPLS
1,068 posts, read 1,196,239 times
Reputation: 668
Since you're looking for an urban experience keep in mind that the urban part of Columbus is only a small fraction of its 200+ sq mi and that the population in this area is closer to 250,000: a good deal smaller than its overall 800,000 figure, let alone DC's 650,000. The north side is the only quadrant that's healthy overall (well, due north, definitely not northeast) and this is where you'll find most of the best neighborhoods: Short North (cocktail and wine territory: also most urban), OSU (swill beer territory), Weinland Park, Old North and Clintonville (craft beer and PBR territory). Downtown has a cluster of theaters and museums along with a selection of wine and dine establishments along with some that favor kitsch. South really only has the Brewery District and German Village immediately south of Downtown for neighborhoods with a good amount to do. East and west you only have a handful of worthwhile destinations clustered near Downtown. For mass transit you're going to have to lower expectations a lot: there's not even decent service from the airport to Downtown. According to google maps you have to take the 1, 2, 6, or 16 and transfer to the 92 and that takes over an hour for what's a 10 minute drive.

Since you mentioned walkability (more destinations and mass transit) and theatres and museums are important, as far as the Midwest goes the next city after Chicago is Minneapolis: most theatre seats per capita after NYC and 4/5 of the city has been revitalized and is full of places to go. That means more variety and an urban population of 400,000 (St Paul right next door adds another 300,000: combined it's close to DC's population). And since you love winter there are plenty of winter activities too. There are bike lanes and lakeside trails everywhere here and lots of reliable mass transit: buses and LRT: it's 37 minutes from the airport to the heart Downtown on the Blue Line or a 23 minute drive. While it's the most expensive city in the region after Chicago it's still easily more affordable than DC or Seattle. I'd suggest checking both out to see which is a better fit and possibly visiting Minneapolis after your October visit to Columbus when not everyone is jogging and biking around the lakes and sitting out on rooftop patios.
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Old 06-22-2015, 10:34 AM
 
417 posts, read 487,471 times
Reputation: 408
If you are not married with kids in cbus by the time you are 25 you are an outsider. Don't let people here fool you. They have not been anywhere else so how would they know.
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Old 06-22-2015, 10:37 AM
 
417 posts, read 487,471 times
Reputation: 408
BTW, 36 in cbus is considered old.
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Old 06-22-2015, 11:30 AM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
15,762 posts, read 14,995,475 times
Reputation: 7002
Quote:
Originally Posted by Muffy1 View Post
If you are not married with kids in cbus by the time you are 25 you are an outsider. Don't let people here fool you. They have not been anywhere else so how would they know.
According to the 2013 census data, the latest available, here is some real data on the subject.

Of all population 15 and older, 44.5% have never been married, including 47.4% of males and 41.7% of females.

Breaking that down further by age group of people who have never been married:
15-19: 99.3%
20-34: 67.2%
35-44: 34.6%
45-54: 25.3%
55-64: 16.4%
65+: 7.4%

So it would seem there's a sizeable population over age 25 that has never even been married, let alone becoming pariahs after 25 if they're not. These numbers don't even include people who were once married but are now divorced or widowed.

So what other claims do people want to make today that can be factually refuted?
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Old 06-22-2015, 11:32 AM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
15,762 posts, read 14,995,475 times
Reputation: 7002
Quote:
Originally Posted by Muffy1 View Post
BTW, 36 in cbus is considered old.
By who? The average age in the city in about 32.
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