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Old 01-24-2009, 03:19 PM
 
1,231 posts, read 2,687,214 times
Reputation: 582

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No, not you personally... No arguments starting....Just noticed that when ever those 2 towns are mentioned... a slew of folks... say to the OP things like...

' I think you'd be happier in blah blah blah '

My only point is that newcomers should be steered to townships in their price range, in the general area they are looking for.

and no...I do not think most of those houses would require 25% value to make them livable. They are for the most part in need of wallpaper removal, paint, and carpet cleaning, maybe a bit of landscaping in the spring, but that is true of every house.

For example only please no personal attacks required....but jmho Newcomers can often (not always) live just fine without granite kitchen renovations or room gutting renovations for some time. Starting with existing flooring and existing laminates/formica, etc in order to adapt slowly and moderately to CT pricing seems prudent in this economy.
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Old 01-24-2009, 04:33 PM
 
5,064 posts, read 15,894,862 times
Reputation: 3577
We bought a "fixer upper" home 12/13 years ago, and the home at the time was 30+ years old. Typical of a fixer-upper, many are even older. It has been a money-pit. It was far from just needing cosmetic upgrades, everything in the home, and I mean everything, was original. Sure, that doesn't sound so bad, it was liveable (and in many ways still is since we haven't finished updating) but it was VERY well worn. Standing in any room in the winter, we could feel a breeze from the windows. They all had to be replaced. (well, two bedrooms still need new windows) Our heating bills were sky-high. We still need a new roof, the driveway had to be completely replaced, the floors were cracking etc., the doors leading outside had to be replaced, the bricks are falling off the chimneys, the electricity was outdated and dangerous and had to be upgraded, the bathroom tiles were falling off, the plumbing was poor, trees were falling near the house, yada-yada-yada. We have spent tens of thousands so far, and still haven't finished remodeling. Older homes can be really expensive to upgrade, it's just wise to inform a newcomer about the possible pitfalls facing them.
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Old 01-24-2009, 04:46 PM
 
756 posts, read 2,218,618 times
Reputation: 635
Quote:
Originally Posted by andthentherewere3 View Post
We bought a "fixer upper" home 12/13 years ago, and the home at the time was 30+ years old. Typical of a fixer-upper, many are even older. It has been a money-pit. It was far from just needing cosmetic upgrades, everything in the home, and I mean everything, was original. Sure, that doesn't sound so bad, it was liveable (and in many ways still is since we haven't finished updating) but it was VERY well worn. Standing in any room in the winter, we could feel a breeze from the windows. They all had to be replaced. (well, two bedrooms still need new windows) Our heating bills were sky-high. We still need a new roof, the driveway had to be completely replaced, the floors were cracking etc., the doors leading outside had to be replaced, the bricks are falling off the chimneys, the electricity was outdated and dangerous and had to be upgraded, the bathroom tiles were falling off, the plumbing was poor, trees were falling near the house, yada-yada-yada. We have spent tens of thousands so far, and still haven't finished remodeling. Older homes can be really expensive to upgrade, it's just wise to inform a newcomer about the possible pitfalls facing them.
I am probably your neighbor! You just described my situation exactly. Except, I bought at top dollar, the economy went haywire and we have no money left over for anything other than the basics right now. My house is only 25 years old but you can stand in any of my bedrooms on a windy, cold day and feel the breeze by the windows. We also need a new driveway. I absolutely love our neighborhood and town but if I had to do things differently, I wouldn't have bought a house that needs so much......
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Old 01-24-2009, 11:24 PM
 
154 posts, read 801,953 times
Reputation: 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by andthentherewere3 View Post
We bought a "fixer upper" home 12/13 years ago, and the home at the time was 30+ years old. Typical of a fixer-upper, many are even older. It has been a money-pit. It was far from just needing cosmetic upgrades, everything in the home, and I mean everything, was original. Sure, that doesn't sound so bad, it was liveable (and in many ways still is since we haven't finished updating) but it was VERY well worn. Standing in any room in the winter, we could feel a breeze from the windows. They all had to be replaced. (well, two bedrooms still need new windows) Our heating bills were sky-high. We still need a new roof, the driveway had to be completely replaced, the floors were cracking etc., the doors leading outside had to be replaced, the bricks are falling off the chimneys, the electricity was outdated and dangerous and had to be upgraded, the bathroom tiles were falling off, the plumbing was poor, trees were falling near the house, yada-yada-yada. We have spent tens of thousands so far, and still haven't finished remodeling. Older homes can be really expensive to upgrade, it's just wise to inform a newcomer about the possible pitfalls facing them.
Amen. I just came from my girl's apartment which is a 2 family 1920's home that seems to have it's original windows. Single pane and you can feel the air right through them. The heat is outdated as is the electrical and the owner just can't afford to make any of the changes needed as windows alone on a house this size could easily be $5,000-10,000. The only good thing is that older homes IMO are built better than many of the new homes which often are put up as fast as possible to increase profit. Of course everything is new though...
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Old 01-25-2009, 01:40 AM
 
8,777 posts, read 19,854,696 times
Reputation: 5291
Quote:
Originally Posted by usmcfamily View Post
My house is only 25 years old but you can stand in any of my bedrooms on a windy, cold day and feel the breeze by the windows. We also need a new driveway. I absolutely love our neighborhood and town but if I had to do things differently, I wouldn't have bought a house that needs so much......
No sense beating yourself up over it. There are plenty of homes in your town in the Whitney Farms area, that are around the age of your home and have substandard build quality. Unfortunately, it's really not apparent on the surface that they were thrown up quickly . They look like nice typical box colonials, but when you probe deeper, you'll see some corners that were cut during construction. If i'm not mistaken, Bargas built a # of homes in Monroe during the 80's boom and their large development in my town(Oronoque Village condos) has always been known for not having the most detailed construction.
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Old 01-25-2009, 05:36 AM
 
5,064 posts, read 15,894,862 times
Reputation: 3577
It's so true, many of the newer homes are poorly built. We have friends in Great Oak Farm in Monroe, and they bought their home three years after it was built. They had to replace the room immediately upon moving in. It was something to do with the builder not venting the roof properly, I think. Not long afterwards the walls began cracking etc. It happens in all towns these days. It's disturbing that a town's inspector will approve these homes. My dh is in the home improvement business, and often inspectors can be really difficult--- It makes you wonder how some of these builders get away with shoddy building on a large scale basis...
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Old 01-25-2009, 07:47 AM
 
1,231 posts, read 2,687,214 times
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All in all, most older homes are still a good value....if you pay for an inspection and pay attention to what the inspector tells you. Buyer be ware and all that jazz. Lots of luck to the OP.
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Old 01-25-2009, 01:43 PM
 
21,618 posts, read 31,186,278 times
Reputation: 9775
Quote:
Originally Posted by seymourct View Post
No, not you personally... No arguments starting....Just noticed that when ever those 2 towns are mentioned... a slew of folks... say to the OP things like...

' I think you'd be happier in blah blah blah '

My only point is that newcomers should be steered to townships in their price range, in the general area they are looking for.

and no...I do not think most of those houses would require 25% value to make them livable. They are for the most part in need of wallpaper removal, paint, and carpet cleaning, maybe a bit of landscaping in the spring, but that is true of every house.

For example only please no personal attacks required....but jmho Newcomers can often (not always) live just fine without granite kitchen renovations or room gutting renovations for some time. Starting with existing flooring and existing laminates/formica, etc in order to adapt slowly and moderately to CT pricing seems prudent in this economy.
When I was looking at houses, we would view one in our price range that looks nice online, then get there and it's a complete dump feet away from a busy street. We looked at houses in Seymour, Oxford, Stratford and Shelton around the $300 mark and found nothing in move in condition (windows unsuitable for winter, severe cracks in foundation, roof issues, kitchens dating back to the 70's, electrical issues). They needed a lot more than just taking down some wallpaper. Even in our house now, which we paid pretty close to our maximum for, we'll be replacing the windows in the spring. Right now we're doing our best to limit the draft (or breeze) coming in through the living room picture window and I won't be able to deal with it for another winter. The kitchen was updated 9 years ago but I'll be doing some work on it i.e. new countertops, maybe an island for more counterspace and the linoleum is starting to peel up.

Anyway, my point is that for $275k in these towns you still can't find much other than a bottom of the barrel starter home - you can forget about granite counter tops and cherry cabinets.
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Old 01-25-2009, 04:08 PM
 
154 posts, read 801,953 times
Reputation: 66
When house hunting I've learned to use a combination of the Microsoft 3/4 birdseye view and the google maps street view when looking at properties. You can see a 360view of the property and surrounding area before even wasting your time. This weeds out many properties that are on a major road, have strange backyards, are close to high traffic zones like schools, have split driveways, etc.
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Old 01-26-2009, 05:33 AM
 
11 posts, read 34,292 times
Reputation: 10
KidYankee you are right. We have been looking but the houses around 250 all need some kind of repair, unless the house is in Brightport and Meriden. It those two towns, plus Waterbury, are where we are centering our search now. I think we will have to move and if we dislike the schools, send private. Where is all the middle class housing in cT?
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