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Old 11-11-2019, 10:37 AM
 
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The other question is... are you sure you need a transformer? Many electronics these days-- phones, computers, etc.-- will convert for themselves; if you look at the label on the back, it will say "110V-240V." I don't know if CD players are the same way?
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Old 11-11-2019, 11:34 AM
 
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Quote:
Europe used a different format for analog called PAL including the DVD's, if you want to view one you need PAL compatible equipment. There is another issue called region coding that only allows the DVD to be played on hardware with same region coding, even if you could find PAL DVD player marketed to US customers it may not play it because it's different region.

Note to the OP in case you are unaware, you'll also need PAL compatible TV. I'm not up on the compatibility with modern equipment but if the DVD player has HDMI output then I see no reason it shouldn't work with modern TV sold here in the US because it would be software issue. However if it only has RCA it's probably not going work because it would be hardware issue.
Correct me if I'm wrong. Unless stereo receivers can discriminate between an audio CD player used in an NTSC area vs. a 625/50-with-PAL-color area, OP really shouldn't have any trouble dealing with incompatible analog video standards on his digital audio CD player. Right?

Quote:
Note: a voltage converter does NOT change the frequency, in other words, what goes in is what comes out, either 50 Hz or 60Hz.
Europe operates at 50 Hz. American frequency is 60 Hz. Even if you change the voltage from 220 to 110 (easy to do) the frequency difference can have serious effects on many devices, from faulty operation to destruction.
Some do: [url]http://www.gohz.com/[/url]

[url]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VrIzlF-lWWg[/url]
Start watching around 20m 40s.

He sets up a Russian-made (late Soviet era) 50 Hz reel-to-reel deck on a voltage/frequency converter unit and plays a Bonneville easy-listening tape on it.

Last edited by Ttark; 11-11-2019 at 11:52 AM..
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Old 11-15-2019, 01:58 PM
 
Location: Portland, OR
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ttark View Post
Correct me if I'm wrong. Unless stereo receivers can discriminate between an audio CD player used in an NTSC area vs. a 625/50-with-PAL-color area, OP really shouldn't have any trouble dealing with incompatible analog video standards on his digital audio CD player. Right?



Some do: Go to 60Hz, 50Hz, 400Hz AC Power Supply | GoHz.com


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VrIzlF-lWWg
Start watching around 20m 40s.

He sets up a Russian-made (late Soviet era) 50 Hz reel-to-reel deck on a voltage/frequency converter unit and plays a Bonneville easy-listening tape on it.

FYI CD players do not look at line frequency for any form of timing. The jitter would be out of this world. They use an onboard crystal. 50/60Hz doesn't make any difference to a CD player.



Also for those who are saying just buy a US CD player. I have an Arcam UK spec FMJ CD player that was well over $1500 15 years ago....
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Old 11-15-2019, 02:30 PM
 
Location: San Antonio/Houston/Tricity
44,751 posts, read 64,059,391 times
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Just that you know and not waste your time. OP obviously lost interest in his thread or our answers.
Didn't log in after his post #4...
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Old 11-16-2019, 08:41 AM
 
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CDs are not PAL or NTSC video based, they are audio.

They are audio CDs that follow the Redbook audio standard. A CD from the UK will play in a CD player from the US.
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Old 11-17-2019, 04:54 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by timfountain View Post
Also for those who are saying just buy a US CD player. I have an Arcam UK spec FMJ CD player that was well over $1500 15 years ago....

It's a stream of 1's and 0's on the disc, the only improvement that can provide is on the analog side. How much can you really expect out of that? I can understand why a high quality record player can be important but a CD player not so much.



Not up on the audio equipment but assuming a $50 Blu-Ray deck delivers the digital stream to a receiver over HDMI any advantage it may have is eliminated.
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Old 11-17-2019, 04:56 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekker99 View Post
CDs are not PAL or NTSC video based, they are audio.

They are audio CDs that follow the Redbook audio standard. A CD from the UK will play in a CD player from the US.

That was brain fart on my part, not enough coffee. I ASSumed DVD since there would a be reason for it.
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Old 11-26-2019, 04:47 PM
 
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Quote:
FYI CD players do not look at line frequency for any form of timing. The jitter would be out of this world. They use an onboard crystal. 50/60Hz doesn't make any difference to a CD player.
I'm VERY well aware of that. The poster I was replying to was having a brain fart caused by acute caffeine deficiency. Facetious much?

Anyways, they may not require line frequency for timing but the CD player's power supply board may only be wired for one frequency or the other. A lot of times there is wide enough tolerance that you can successfully operate e.g. a 60 Hz device on a 50 Hz line just using a step-down transformer and plug adapter (some even specify "50-60 Hz" on the back panel), in others the device might work but the power supply may run hotter than it's meant to and could eventually cook itself, or the device may just outright refuse to function. Depends how the PSU is wired and the tolerance of its components.
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Old 11-26-2019, 09:41 PM
 
Location: San Antonio/Houston/Tricity
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ttark View Post
I'm VERY well aware of that. The poster I was replying to was having a brain fart caused by acute caffeine deficiency. Facetious much?

Anyways, they may not require line frequency for timing but the CD player's power supply board may only be wired for one frequency or the other. A lot of times there is wide enough tolerance that you can successfully operate e.g. a 60 Hz device on a 50 Hz line just using a step-down transformer and plug adapter (some even specify "50-60 Hz" on the back panel), in others the device might work but the power supply may run hotter than it's meant to and could eventually cook itself, or the device may just outright refuse to function. Depends how the PSU is wired and the tolerance of its components.

I had a brain fart???????????

I got this info from this website:
Electric Differences in Europe. 220 volts and 50 Hz. (couldn't open the original link)
But, right - the article is about small appliances/gadgets - not particularly CD's
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Old 11-27-2019, 07:55 AM
 
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I'm not aware of much equipment that would be damaged by operation at 60Hz instead of 50 Hz or vice versa. We've seen some difficulties in starting large split phase motors designed for one frequency at another, especially at the low range of voltage. Electric clocks (which are vanishingly rare these days) would be inaccurate by a factor of 60/50 or 50/60, because they actually use a synchronous motor; but 99.999% of AC powered clocks are quartz and have a rectifier. Appliances using split phase or 3 phase motors would run slower. Brush type motors (electric drills, vacuum cleaners, etc.) are unaffected. Brushless DC motors (all over the place these days) are unaffected.


Keep in mind that Japan is half 50 Hz and half 60 Hz and they manage just fine.


I'm willing to bet that 99+% of the circuitry in a CD player is low voltage DC and that the first thing that happens is a DC power supply, probably 24VDC. In theory, IF said power supply is designed for 50 Hz or 60 Hz only, then it COULD possibly run hot at hte other frequency. However, a CD player is a low power device. I very seriously doubt any CD player could be adversely affected. For that matter, since the vast majority of CD players are made in Asia for worldwide distribution, it's probably the same exact power supply in every one, and when they're shipping to North America or Japan they set a DIP switch to "100-115V" and put a US/Japan cord, and when they're shipping to Europe they set teh DIP switch to "220-230V" and put a Euro cord.


Of course, OP has long since either blown up the equipment in question or not; but I would expect a Euro spec CD player to work just dandy on a step-up transformer. MAYBE, if you have a big honkin' power amp and run it near its maximum power, MAYBE, you would have some trouble.
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