U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Corpus Christi
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-27-2015, 10:06 PM
 
Location: Corpus Christi
288 posts, read 489,385 times
Reputation: 494

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rust Never Sleeps View Post
West Nile Virus Is Back In Texas - keyetv.com Austin News, Weather, Traffic KEYE-TV Austin - Top Stories

The big concern is none of the above. The big concern is chikungunya virus!

Every single case of Chik V in Texas is imported to date. Not from our mosquitoes. Potential is there, but it hasn't happened. https://www.dshs.state.tx.us/news/updates.shtm

Quote:
Water moccasins, Cottonmouths feed primarily on fish, frogs, mice and rats! Copperheads eat frogs, massasauga rattlesnakes eat toads, Padre Island is full of them.


I figure you can Google that for yourself.

Rust
The pit viper generally eats small mammals, but will eat other things on occasion. Nonvenomous garter snakes generally eat the lion's share of amphibians.
Your friend doesn't have cottonmouths in his or her yard.
No stable copperhead population south of Matagorda. Check the IUCN redlist.
Quote:
[According to Klauber (1956), S. catenatus feeds on frogs more frequently than any other rattlesnake. In general, however, frogs are not an important part of the diet, although this does seem to be more typical in certain northern and eastern populations
If they have a population of coral snakes in their yard, then let the guys at NNTRC down in Kingsville know. We need more venom and are always collecting them. Also, corals eat other snakes generally.

Sorry, I teach courses on this subject.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-28-2015, 12:30 AM
 
Location: Smithville, TX
553 posts, read 867,327 times
Reputation: 502
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr.Mcninja View Post
Your friend doesn't have cottonmouths in his or her yard.
No stable copperhead population south of Matagorda. Check the IUCN redlist.
The point, after the recent floods snakes have been flushed down the rivers and creeks. Although there may normally be no stable local copperhead populations, those we are concerned with are the unstable, displaced and confused snakes resulting from the floods. Oso Creek, which separates the Southside from Flour Bluff, flooded significantly, the current pushes everything in it towards the Cayo Del Oso. Oso Creek is approx. 27 miles long. If you closely read my post you will note I did not say my friend found a "Copperhead" in her backyard. She does have a large Koa pond so snakes, of any kind, concern her.

Heard there were a couple fellows collecting snakes along Oso Creek last week. I'm dismayed at the number of people who enjoy keeping snakes/spiders/ and other creepy pets.


[/quote]Sorry, I teach courses on this subject.[/quote]

No reason to be sorry, most successful professionals invest in continuing education that give them up to date knowledge and skills. . . most important for teachers.

We, lay-people have the option of 2nd. and 3rd. opinions.

Here:
Hundreds of copperhead snakes removed in Brazoria County neighborhood | News - Home

Watch your step: It's snake bite season, officials warn - Caller-Times

KRISTV.com | Continuous News Coverage | Corpus Christi - With the South Texas heat comes the venomous snakes: Local exper

Related in the new normal's, is the highly pathogenic avian flu which might catch your attention when you next buy eggs.

https://fortune.com/2015/06/25/bird-flu-outbreak-farms/
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-28-2015, 12:42 PM
 
Location: Corpus Christi
288 posts, read 489,385 times
Reputation: 494
I didn't say you said what snake, I said that the snakes in her yard weren't venomous. Then you posted about copperheads, cottonmouths, and the massasauga (not mentioning if you meant desert or western) specifically.
All I was trying to do is teach people that the hysteria about snakes is misguided, and that the ones in their yards are not likely to hurt them.
Since we don't live in Brazoria, nor are we in their downstream effluent, I'm not sure that I care how many copperheads are removed from a house there.
The Kleberg article mentions that they treat 4 patients per year. While not zero, not a huge public health concern either. The majority of people bitten aren't walking through their yards. They are drunk, young males who pick them up and mess with them. There's a saying about the 5 T's of snakebites. No Teeth, lots of Tattoos, Testosterone, inToxicated, and owning a Truck.
All the bird flu outbreak has done so far in our country is limit our eggs. I keep it on the radar, but don't worry until it actually affects humans.
This is similar to my friends in NC. Many of them are calling for culls in the sharks (similar to what we do with the rattlesnake roundups here in Texas, which are terrible). Simply put, no sharks have killed anybody in NC this year, and only a handful in the last 100 have died. More people have died from Tylenol (458 deahts/year across the US) in NC than from sharks, and more people have died from Tylenol in TX than have died from snakebites (~1/year). People need to stop engendering fear, and the news is a big part of it with sensationalist media.
For the record, while I know Tim, to call him a local expert is a bit of a stretch. He was simply the person there when the news came by. I know this because I too have been asked to speak on things that I'm not an expert in, but instead because I was there the day the cameras were there. Don't put too much stock in what the local, regional, or even national news says without digging into it. Mark, on the other hand, is an expert in snake husbandry, but isn't as familiar with the clinical aspects of snakebites. He and I are friends, and I go to him about snakes behavior often.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-28-2015, 04:37 PM
 
Location: Smithville, TX
553 posts, read 867,327 times
Reputation: 502
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr.Mcninja View Post
Don't put too much stock in what the local, regional, or even national news says without digging into it.
I don't - I depend on wandering in the weeds of incoherent postings on C-D.

Hydrogen peroxide can take the itch out of mosquito bites.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-29-2015, 12:16 PM
 
15,247 posts, read 17,797,135 times
Reputation: 25506
To the OP: The mosquitoes were bad but then the city must have sprayed because they're not bad now. I don't like it when they spray because it's hard on lots of insects I like, such as fireflies, but I guess the city feels compelled.

Although I'm no expert, I agree with Dr. McNinja that there is very little danger from poisonous snakes in this area. CC is not in Kleberg County or Brazoria, which are cited in the articles. I've lived here most of my life and I've never heard of anyone being bitten by any snake in a residential neighborhood. If you're mucking around the Nueces River or Oso Creek, or in the flats around Flour Bluff, or walking in the dunes on Padre Island, you should be careful. But it's not something the average person in town needs to worry about.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-29-2015, 01:02 PM
 
Location: Smithville, TX
553 posts, read 867,327 times
Reputation: 502
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marlow View Post
To the OP: The mosquitoes were bad but then the city must have sprayed because they're not bad now. I don't like it when they spray because it's hard on lots of insects I like, such as fireflies, but I guess the city feels compelled.

Although I'm no expert, I agree with Dr. McNinja that there is very little danger from poisonous snakes in this area. CC is not in Kleberg County or Brazoria, which are cited in the articles. I've lived here most of my life and I've never heard of anyone being bitten by any snake in a residential neighborhood. If you're mucking around the Nueces River or Oso Creek, or in the flats around Flour Bluff, or walking in the dunes on Padre Island, you should be careful. But it's not something the average person in town needs to worry about.
No, it's not usually a problem, the recent floods have created snake problems around the state. I mentioned a lady friend found one her backyard, that's all. I don't recall seeing a snake in Lamar Park my entire childhood or coyotes for that matter. There were snakes in the water features at Oso Golf course, which isn't too far from you.

Heavy rains drive snakes into open, some into homes | Dallas Morning News

Coral snakes bite 2 - Caller-Times

I was surprised to read Driscoll Children's Hospital (in Corpus Christi) treats an average of 20 snake bites a year. It's not required to report snake bites to local authorities.

https://news.google.com/newspapers?n...,6310915&hl=en


Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-29-2015, 01:16 PM
 
Location: Corpus Christi
288 posts, read 489,385 times
Reputation: 494
While snakes do seek higher ground when the water is saturated, much of that is simply behavior to find prey. Again, that Dallas article mentioned specifically that
Quote:
The key is not to overreact, said the state’s top snake expert, herpetologist Andrew Gluesenkamp with the Texas Department of Parks and Wildlife.
So, you found an article from 2008 that said 2 people where bitten by coral snakes, and now we should be scared? Also, for the record, coral snake antivenom isn't produced anymore, and the stock is down to almost nothing. They've been extending the expiration date because nobody has made any, and the Mexican product isn't FDA approved.
That paper from 1989 said 20 bites were seen at Driscoll that year. We don't see 20 venomous bites per year there. Sure, people come in for snakebite, but that doesn't mean significant snake bite. Similarly, the literature states that >95% of "spider bites" are not, in fact, from spiders, but instead MRSA. Sure, we do have loxosceles species here, but we simply don't have a large volume of loxoscelism.
Nobody is saying it doesn't happen. Just that it isn't as important as you and the media keep trying to make it out to be. In fact, you seem to be desperately searching for anecdotes to support your view, going back more than 20 years to find "proof" that snakes are a problem.

Last edited by Dr.Mcninja; 06-29-2015 at 02:06 PM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-29-2015, 01:42 PM
 
15,247 posts, read 17,797,135 times
Reputation: 25506
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rust Never Sleeps View Post
No, it's not usually a problem, the recent floods have created snake problems around the state. I mentioned a lady friend found one her backyard, that's all. I don't recall seeing a snake in Lamar Park my entire childhood or coyotes for that matter. There were snakes in the water features at Oso Golf course, which isn't too far from you.

Heavy rains drive snakes into open, some into homes | Dallas Morning News

Coral snakes bite 2 - Caller-Times

I was surprised to read Driscoll Children's Hospital (in Corpus Christi) treats an average of 20 snake bites a year. It's not required to report snake bites to local authorities.

https://news.google.com/newspapers?n...,6310915&hl=en


None of these articles have anything to do with an increase in snakes or snake bites in Corpus Christi because of the recent rains. Yes, snakes exist, and yes, snakes sometimes bite people. But you seem to be intent on creating an impression that the average person in Corpus Christi is at risk for snake bite because we've had rain lately. None of the links you've posted supports that notion.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-29-2015, 03:15 PM
 
Location: Smithville, TX
553 posts, read 867,327 times
Reputation: 502
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marlow View Post
None of these articles have anything to do with an increase in snakes or snake bites in Corpus Christi because of the recent rains. Yes, snakes exist, and yes, snakes sometimes bite people. But you seem to be intent on creating an impression that the average person in Corpus Christi is at risk for snake bite because we've had rain lately. None of the links you've posted supports that notion.
Perhaps that's your impression. We can extrapolate from the Dallas link and many recent news stories in flood areas that snakes are a concern, take caution. Does Corpus have some kind of special dispensation? Here's a notion to disabuse:


KRISTV.com | Continuous News Coverage | Corpus Christi - With the South Texas heat comes the venomous snakes: Local exper


CORPUS CHRISTI -
It's that time of the year when the weather warms up and the snakes come out and local experts urge families to be a little more cautious when enjoying the great outdoors.

Dr. Tim Carter is the ER Medical Director at Corpus Christi Medical Center. He says this is generally the time of the year when he sees more and more snake bite patients and most of these cases are from snakes, like rattlesnakes, which can be found right in your own backyard!

Dr. Carter says if you're bit, keep calm and call 911 right away. "Take off anything that's constricting and get to an ER as soon as you can."

We headed over to the TAMUK's National Natural Toxins Research Center to find out why this time of the year brings out the snakes in South Texas. Mark Hockmuller, Serpentarium Curator at TAMUK says, "It just got warm. We've had a lot of rain and snakes are on the move. They naturally want to start moving around, finding food, finding a mate."

Other snakes that could cause you some pain and can be found in our area are the copperhead, water moccasin and the coral snake.

Some advice from the experts next time you find yourself sharing your space with a snake like on the beach, in a field picking bluebonnets or just mowing the lawn. Hockmuller says the old saying is the best to remember if you think you see a coral snake, "red on black, friend of Jack. Red on yellow, kills a fellow."

CCMC adds, if somebody gets bit by a snake, there's no need to bring it into the emergency department but you can take a picture of the snake from a safe distance.

We notice opinions differ:

According to DrNinga:

"For the record, while I know Tim, to call him a local expert is a bit of a stretch. He was simply the person there when the news came by. I know this because I too have been asked to speak on things that I'm not an expert in, but instead because I was there the day the cameras were there. Don't put too much stock in what the local, regional, or even national news says without digging into it. Mark, on the other hand, is an expert in snake husbandry, but isn't as familiar with the clinical aspects of snakebites. He and I are friends, and I go to him about snakes behavior often."
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-29-2015, 04:02 PM
 
Location: Smithville, TX
553 posts, read 867,327 times
Reputation: 502
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr.Mcninja View Post
While snakes do seek higher ground when the water is saturated, much of that is simply behavior to find prey. Again, that Dallas article mentioned specifically that
So, you found an article from 2008 that said 2 people where bitten by coral snakes, and now we should be scared? Also, for the record, coral snake antivenom isn't produced anymore, and the stock is down to almost nothing. They've been extending the expiration date because nobody has made any, and the Mexican product isn't FDA approved.
That paper from 1989 said 20 bites were seen at Driscoll that year. We don't see 20 venomous bites per year there. Sure, people come in for snakebite, but that doesn't mean significant snake bite. Similarly, the literature states that >95% of "spider bites" are not, in fact, from spiders, but instead MRSA. Sure, we do have loxosceles species here, but we simply don't have a large volume of loxoscelism.
Nobody is saying it doesn't happen. Just that it isn't as important as you and the media keep trying to make it out to be. In fact, you seem to be desperately searching for anecdotes to support your view, going back more than 20 years to find "proof" that snakes are a problem.
It appears you would put words in my mouth. Where have I said anyone ought to be scared?

(All 6 of us reading this)

Going back 20 years is nothing at my age. In fact, I recall it was more than 20 years ago when Tiger mosquitoes first arrived in Houston. I well recall reading about that, big news at the time, approx. 1984.
So now you want to parse snakebites into "significant snake bites" -vs- "Fatal"?

Antivenom FAQ - Poison Center Tampa

Hell, I've been retired almost 20 years
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Corpus Christi
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

¬© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top