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Old 06-06-2014, 07:28 PM
 
1,789 posts, read 2,087,873 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TurtleCreek80 View Post
I think part of the "culture shock" that relocatees encounter is due to the fact they are relocating to the suburbs, which are BY FAR the most conservative part of Dallas. Couple that with the fact that many of the popular suburbs were nothing more than backwards hick small towns until the last 10-20 years when the city spread so far out that the suburban developments engulfed these towns....some of the "old timers" are vey backwards.

Relocatees might find people they like more and have more in common with in some of the diverse and more liberal city neighborhoods....but you can't find a brand new huge house in Lakewood or North Oak Cliff for $250k so these people end up living in Savannah or Little Elm or Allen instead.

Also, there are many relocatees who specifically choose the DFW suburbs because they want to live in a conservative suburb in the Bible Belt vs wherever they're coming from. It's probably confusing for a typical Californian to encounter these relocatees but there are a lot of them & Collin County or Denton County is a great place for them to meet their desired lifestyle.
My immediate neighbors: 2 homes Colorado(1 being Asian), 1 home India, 1 homeNorth Carolina(AA), 1 home Texas, and myself Tennessee. Just packed full of backwards hicks judging "outsiders"
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Old 06-06-2014, 09:03 PM
 
Location: North Texas
24,576 posts, read 34,285,379 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TurtleCreek80 View Post
I think part of the "culture shock" that relocatees encounter is due to the fact they are relocating to the suburbs, which are BY FAR the most conservative part of Dallas. Couple that with the fact that many of the popular suburbs were nothing more than backwards hick small towns until the last 10-20 years when the city spread so far out that the suburban developments engulfed these towns....some of the "old timers" are vey backwards.

Relocatees might find people they like more and have more in common with in some of the diverse and more liberal city neighborhoods....but you can't find a brand new huge house in Lakewood or North Oak Cliff for $250k so these people end up living in Savannah or Little Elm or Allen instead.

Also, there are many relocatees who specifically choose the DFW suburbs because they want to live in a conservative suburb in the Bible Belt vs wherever they're coming from. It's probably confusing for a typical Californian to encounter these relocatees but there are a lot of them & Collin County or Denton County is a great place for them to meet their desired lifestyle.
Nailed it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Reina_Sol View Post
Not surprising and quite common in parts of the area where the locals aren't accustomed to outsiders.
Yes, because people on the East Coast are so friendly and welcoming to Texans. Just passing through Boston's airport I was subjected to abusive comments by people unhappy with then-President Bush. Like I singlehandedly put him in office by voting for GORE. When I encountered East Coasters while living abroad, they treated me like some quaint ignorant hick as soon as they found out I was from Texas. Nevermind that I could blend in with locals AND speak the language while they shuffled around like idiots in their size XXXXXL jeans and prison-white sneakers, trying desperately to find someone...anyone...who could speak English well enough to tell them where the nearest toilet was.

Some of us are used to outsiders. That's why we're not polite to some of them. What, do you think just because you're not from around here we're going to become your instant bestie and invite you into our charming little homes and sit in open-mouthed hick-like awe at your sophisticated ways as you sneer at our sweet tea and blackberry cobbler and the requisite giant aged bronze star on the wall or wall of decorative crosses or other "hick" decor stereotype?

And before you think me unsophisticated...I hold several passports, speak several languages fluently, and have lived in several countries. And I'm not a WASP hick either. This Jew can belt out Garth Brooks songs over cheap beer just as easily as she can put on a fancy dress and go to the symphony. And fit my narrow size 4 butt in the seat. And stay awake.

*mike drop*

Sorry, but attitudes like this **** me off. You're glad you moved away? We are too. Believe me. We are too. If you hated it here, you did yourself AND us a favor by moving away. I may hate Dallas, but I'm from here. I've earned it.
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Old 06-07-2014, 09:41 AM
 
1,637 posts, read 3,701,604 times
Reputation: 1029
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigDGeek View Post
Nailed it.



Yes, because people on the East Coast are so friendly and welcoming to Texans. Just passing through Boston's airport I was subjected to abusive comments by people unhappy with then-President Bush. Like I singlehandedly put him in office by voting for GORE. When I encountered East Coasters while living abroad, they treated me like some quaint ignorant hick as soon as they found out I was from Texas. Nevermind that I could blend in with locals AND speak the language while they shuffled around like idiots in their size XXXXXL jeans and prison-white sneakers, trying desperately to find someone...anyone...who could speak English well enough to tell them where the nearest toilet was.

Some of us are used to outsiders. That's why we're not polite to some of them. What, do you think just because you're not from around here we're going to become your instant bestie and invite you into our charming little homes and sit in open-mouthed hick-like awe at your sophisticated ways as you sneer at our sweet tea and blackberry cobbler and the requisite giant aged bronze star on the wall or wall of decorative crosses or other "hick" decor stereotype?

And before you think me unsophisticated...I hold several passports, speak several languages fluently, and have lived in several countries. And I'm not a WASP hick either. This Jew can belt out Garth Brooks songs over cheap beer just as easily as she can put on a fancy dress and go to the symphony. And fit my narrow size 4 butt in the seat. And stay awake.

*mike drop*

Sorry, but attitudes like this **** me off. You're glad you moved away? We are too. Believe me. We are too. If you hated it here, you did yourself AND us a favor by moving away. I may hate Dallas, but I'm from here. I've earned it.
If we had this attitude in L.A., things would be really bad. Virtually EVERYONE here is a transplant. I'm from here. No one really questions where anyone is from or gives them crap about it or their desire to work in "the industry". Well, some folks are hung up on the Mexicans but that's a different conversation.

The way I was treated, even when I was optimistic and positive about living in Texas, was not great and based solely on where my parents raised me geographically. I don't know what else to say to articulate my feelings or experiences except, the way I was sometimes treated or talked to was unlike anything I've ever seen or experienced and unlike any way I've ever treated a transplant in my "homeland". People flock to where it is cheap. And often times cheap isn't always quality.
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Old 06-07-2014, 03:01 PM
 
Location: North Texas
24,576 posts, read 34,285,379 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr.Bungle View Post
If we had this attitude in L.A., things would be really bad. Virtually EVERYONE here is a transplant. I'm from here. No one really questions where anyone is from or gives them crap about it or their desire to work in "the industry". Well, some folks are hung up on the Mexicans but that's a different conversation.

The way I was treated, even when I was optimistic and positive about living in Texas, was not great and based solely on where my parents raised me geographically. I don't know what else to say to articulate my feelings or experiences except, the way I was sometimes treated or talked to was unlike anything I've ever seen or experienced and unlike any way I've ever treated a transplant in my "homeland". People flock to where it is cheap. And often times cheap isn't always quality.
The thing is...even when some Texans bristle at "outsiders", we usually warm to individuals if they're good people. For example, my neighbors aren't from Texas either. They're from Missouri and Arkansas. But they're awesome amazing people so I don't care where they're from.

To be honest I don't treat people a certain way just because they lack a Texas accent. I may inwardly roll my eyes when someone has a really strong west coast or New England accent, but I remind myself to judge each individual on their merits. Some of my nearest and dearest friends are from up north with strong regional accents. They're good people and that's why I'm friends with them. And some native Texans are complete jerks that I wouldn't give a rope to if they were dangling from a cliff.

What I don't like, and I'm just speaking for myself, is the massive influx into this area because it's contributing to things I don't like: water shortages, threats of rolling blackouts, more traffic, more sprawl, more tollroads, more congestion. I also don't like it when people come here and try to turn it into where they came from, or gripe endlessly about how it's not like home, or look down their noses at us.

But as long as people are nice, I treat them nicely.
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Old 06-07-2014, 07:35 PM
 
Location: Georgia native in McKinney, TX
8,059 posts, read 10,545,556 times
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Again, most any person anywhere will be put off by an outsider that comes in with an attitude (and accompanying words) that portray a message that proclaims the area as backwards and less than where the outsider came from. How can anyone NOT expect a reply to "go back to where you came from" when they get this attitude from any newcomer.

I have no doubt the previous poster that got the curt reply in McKinney to go back to California got told that things were done much better in California than they way the McKinney person was doing it. I guarantee that some sort of message like that was given to receive such a reply.

The fact that people here consider a native of any of the surrounding towns "hick" or "backwards" or "redneck" is downright insulting. If we are going to associate steroeotypes in such a broad brush way, give me a local multi generational salt of the earth Texan from a small town over the fake pretentiousness of an urban Dallas denizen anyday.
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Old 06-07-2014, 07:51 PM
 
Location: North Texas
24,576 posts, read 34,285,379 times
Reputation: 28402
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saintmarks View Post
Again, most any person anywhere will be put off by an outsider that comes in with an attitude (and accompanying words) that portray a message that proclaims the area as backwards and less than where the outsider came from. How can anyone NOT expect a reply to "go back to where you came from" when they get this attitude from any newcomer.

I have no doubt the previous poster that got the curt reply in McKinney to go back to California got told that things were done much better in California than they way the McKinney person was doing it. I guarantee that some sort of message like that was given to receive such a reply.

The fact that people here consider a native of any of the surrounding towns "hick" or "backwards" or "redneck" is downright insulting. If we are going to associate steroeotypes in such a broad brush way, give me a local multi generational salt of the earth Texan from a small town over the fake pretentiousness of an urban Dallas denizen anyday.
Amen to that. I'm sure some pretentious snobs would consider my elderly neighbors to be "backwoods hicks" but they are truly the salt of the Earth. I have enormous respect and affection for them.
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Old 06-07-2014, 08:13 PM
 
1,789 posts, read 2,087,873 times
Reputation: 1719
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigDGeek View Post
The thing is...even when some Texans bristle at "outsiders", we usually warm to individuals if they're good people. For example, my neighbors aren't from Texas either. They're from Missouri and Arkansas. But they're awesome amazing people so I don't care where they're from.

To be honest I don't treat people a certain way just because they lack a Texas accent. I may inwardly roll my eyes when someone has a really strong west coast or New England accent, but I remind myself to judge each individual on their merits. Some of my nearest and dearest friends are from up north with strong regional accents. They're good people and that's why I'm friends with them. And some native Texans are complete jerks that I wouldn't give a rope to if they were dangling from a cliff.

What I don't like, and I'm just speaking for myself, is the massive influx into this area because it's contributing to things I don't like: water shortages, threats of rolling blackouts, more traffic, more sprawl, more tollroads, more congestion. I also don't like it when people come here and try to turn it into where they came from, or gripe endlessly about how it's not like home, or look down their noses at us.

But as long as people are nice, I treat them nicely.
Definitely agree with the bolded statement.
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Old 07-27-2014, 09:46 AM
 
2 posts, read 2,362 times
Reputation: 15
Californians have a sense of entitlement. They truely think they are better. It's engrained in the culture and stimulated by the government. If you can afford to live, survive the competition, deal with the traffic, be a critict of wine/beer because you know better, devote yourself to more than one sports team, join odd and unique clubs, put rims on a benz/bmw to be different, live in a 500k town home, participate in every outdoor activity (cause the topography allows), etc etc. - you can survive anywhere and your better because of it. LoL!

Then comes the, I'm more experienced attitude of "let me tell you" or "I had this option" or " Omg you just got a trader joes, in & out burger, or ikea" Sigh. I WAS a Cali native and proud at one point. Acted just like that. I now live in CO (8 yrs) and see things differently. I tried to move back to Cali for the same reasons as that lady that will divorcer her husband for L.A. Thats cali for you - devotion to a soul sucking state. Soon after moving back I realized that the ignorance and pompous behavior of Californians is disgusting. I still love what Cali has to offer but dispise the people and concrete it has created. Yes I'm talking to all of you self righteous Californians. Stay there. Go back. Keep it local and don't relocate. You're better and know it. Don't leave - Cali needs you.

Last edited by Visitinstead; 07-27-2014 at 09:55 AM..
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Old 07-27-2014, 10:19 AM
 
81 posts, read 95,824 times
Reputation: 58
Default McKinney resident here

McKinney is a very interesting place. The city council and ISD both spend as much money as they possibly can, while telling us they are cutting expenses. MISD has the highest tax rate in the entire state, $1.67 per $100 valuation. The good news is that rate cannot go higher.

Traffic is pretty congested.

The really good news is that right now we have somehow entered into a grocery war. In McKinney we now have the old standbys, Kroger's, Albertson's, Tom Thumb, and then the newcomers: Super1, Sprouts, Winco, and soon to come Trader Joe's.

And, I almost forgot, there are at least two Mexican grocery stores on the east side of town.

I've never been to California, but coming from Austin, the metroplex is such a huge place, I would rent for an entire year, except I just remembered for tax purposes you probably have to reinvest that capital gain within a year. So, make it rent for a year minus one day!

If you are thinking north part of the metroplex, I would look at schools first, then quality of life 2nd.

I might even buy a very small home to get the kids through elementary, and then re-asses when they're in 5th grade. I actually think that last idea is a great idea. If you were to buy the smallest home in a nice neighborhood based on 1. the quality of the elementary school and 2. the quality of life in the neighborhood, then you could spend the next few years deciding where you want to live for the remainder of the children's education.

Right now, I would rate the elementary schools in the northern part of the metroplex:

1. Frisco
2. Allen
3. McKinney
4. Plano

If you live in a certain zone, I have heard fantastic things about the charter school in McKinney. It's charter is to serve the gifted population. They also have an IB curriculum. The name is Imagine.
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Old 07-27-2014, 10:31 AM
 
81 posts, read 95,824 times
Reputation: 58
Default almost forgot about utility bills!

We lived in a 2 bedroom apartment(929 s. f.) for five years in McKinney. Our bills from TXU averaged about $140 per month.

In 2004 we moved to a Fox and Jacobs 2700 s. f. home. The home was built in 2001. Fox and Jacobs is a base-level, cookie cutter home builder that gives the customer a whole lot of room for the money!

I was worried about electric bills. But, we got lucky, the bills were about $180ish when we moved in. We keep the thermostat pretty high in the summer. The home is 100% electric.

Fast-forward ten years later, our most recent bill was $230, from a different provider, Pennywise.
Our next bill will be one of the two highest bills this summer, probably between $260 and $290.

I don't know what it's like in Cali, but here you must stay on top of your electric provider, if you want the best deal. They have you sign a contract and after that is up, your bill will most definitely go up.

Water bills are cheap. We are a family of four and we pay $70 for water and trash.
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