U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Dallas
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-03-2014, 10:40 AM
 
244 posts, read 320,805 times
Reputation: 205

Advertisements

Good points, HockDad.

One thing I've figured out about my son is that he only intellectually functions on his highest levels when he's around kids who are higher performing/smarter than he is. When he is around said children, he rises to the occasion and often surprises me. I see this as a negative we have to overcome- intrinsic, personal motivation is something I value very much- but for now, my solution is to make sure he's in a school where he is surrounded by children who fall into the smart/high performing category.

I say all of that because I'm not sure I'm willing to give up what I consider to be hard earned vacations and submit myself to constantly feeling like I can't provide enough for St. Marks or Greenhill (assuming he could get in), if he could go to Dealey, Harry Stone, or St. Rita and later TAG or Jesuit and still be with other high performers.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-03-2014, 10:43 AM
 
Location: The Village
1,622 posts, read 4,072,276 times
Reputation: 669
While it depends on where in North Oak Cliff you live, I personally don't think it's worth the cost at the elementary school level if you have access to a good elementary school. I wouldn't pay to send a kid to private school if I lived in the Rosemont attendance zone or could transfer my kid there. Winnetka and Arcadia Park are also both very good elementary schools. Harry Stone Montessori east of 35 is also an excellent school.

At the middle school and high school level, it makes much more sense to consider private school. Bishop Dunne is right there in North Oak Cliff and is a very good school, especially for the price . I believe it serves 6-12. If you're dead set on going private, you might ask BD what they consider to be the best feeder school in the area and send your kids there, though sometimes the answer can be surprising. Jesuit's admission staff regularly recommend an Episcopalian school, for instance (Good Shepherd), albeit one that is absurdly expensive.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-03-2014, 10:43 AM
 
Location: Funky town
954 posts, read 1,532,758 times
Reputation: 646
Quote:
Originally Posted by HockDad View Post
I agree with TC80, but let me add one other thought. I think whether you will feel comfortable on the private schools also depends on the parents. For example, we go to school with one family that has less than most of the students at my daughters' school. They are just so grateful that they are at the school that there does not appear to be a jealous bone in their body and they have no issues driving 30 minutes to school. On the other hand, there are a multitude of moms that seem very concerned on where people summer, vacation homes, country clubs, etc. The jealously can make the school far less attractive.

Now I think those issues would arise at many, if not, most of the schools I would consider sending my kids (HPISD, Plano, Southlake, etc.). However, at many of the privates, the money is so pervasive that it is hard to miss. For example, when I was growing up it was a big deal if someone's grandparents had Cowboys season tickets, but at ESD, the kids' grandpa owns the cowboys. Heck, in one of my daughter's classes, there are a half dozen families that own private planes.

If you are the type of person that being around very rich people is going to be an issue, you may want to stick with the public schools.

I only bring that point up because it seems important based on the original post. Now that being said, the top private schools in the metroplex offer the best education in the metroplex. The teachers are great and the campuses are top notch.
How can it not be an issue for folks who are middle class and are sacrificing a new car or vacation for their kids' tuition? More than parents it is hard for a kid to deal with that especially in high school. How do I know? My parents were middle-class and sacrificed a ton in vacation, house, etc. but at school I was constantly reminded of how to get along with kids of rich parents. I am not talking about bullying but things you can never be part of the conversation because you don't "roll" like that. In fact, it creates a feeling of scarcity in kids and I remember I often ended up asking my parents "why can't we have a party like that or why can't we go there or why can't we buy this, etc". Luckily we had more than half the class from middle income families so I was able to make great friends but the kid recognizes and feels that dynamic very deeply...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-03-2014, 11:39 AM
 
16,092 posts, read 37,219,012 times
Reputation: 6280
Check out The death of DISD attendance zones? » Lakewood A school transfer might work. IB is only offered at Long Middle and Woodrow Wilson High so you can make applications for transfer. However, Woodrow currently has a cap of 75 spots and roughly half will go to those outside the attendance zone. In three years, we may have International Baccalaureate PYP at Lee and Lipscomb elementaries. Mata Montessori, which will be opening this fall, is for students in the Woodrow feeder pattern but if those slots are not filled, anyone in the district may apply. As I understand it, not all the slots have been filled for this fall, so it should go out for district-wide applications. Also there are the magnets, some easier to get into than others.

At the high school level, many of the comprehensive schools are set up with academies - so you can transfer in for those. At Woodrow we have four and will probably be adding a fifth. Our STEM Academy allows students to start taking engineering in their freshman year, whereas I'm told that at SEM they must wait until their sophomore year. Our engineering academy has been certified as "the premier" in Dallas by Project Lead the Way. WWHS uses the same PTLW curriculum as Brooklyn Tech among others...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-03-2014, 12:13 PM
 
244 posts, read 320,805 times
Reputation: 205
Moderator cut: orphaned I'm not a suburb person. I will learn the ins and outs of the school system or go private to stay in North Oak Cliff/Winnetka Heights and enjoy all the benefits of a close, diverse community.

All the comments are very helpful- I had not heard of the Lakewood public Montessori. I also thought I had read that Harry Stone was going Pre-IB for middle school?

Last edited by RonnieinDallas; 06-03-2014 at 03:28 PM.. Reason: Deleted post you responded to
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-03-2014, 01:13 PM
 
16,092 posts, read 37,219,012 times
Reputation: 6280
It's a candidate school - this means it can use the curriculum. That's what J. L. Long has done for the past couple of years until it was officially accredited this spring. http://www.dallasisd.org/cms/lib/TX0...this%20one.pdf

More on Mata: News Around Our Neighborhood - April 15, 2014 | Lakewood Hills Neighborhood Association
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-03-2014, 01:31 PM
 
Location: Texas
182 posts, read 202,611 times
Reputation: 340
Quote:
Originally Posted by HockDad View Post
If you are the type of person that being around very rich people is going to be an issue, you may want to stick with the public schools.
This is very important to understand.

At the top private schools in Texas, parents of children have far more opportunity to flaunt their wealth around their peers. The endowments for many of these schools, and the business that goes along with that at is, well, big business. These schools will have dedicated offices within the schools that do nothing more than to provide opportunities for the wealthy to flaunt their $$ in front of their peers (typically called the "office of advancement") through numerous galas, fundraisers, parties, naming rights etc. They aren't staffed by educators, they are staffed by marketing and event planning types.

If you aren't used to that kind of environment, then get ready to see your children's peers who have front-row named parking spaces that the nannies pull in to, and buildings, courtyards, benches, bricks, and classrooms named after many of the parents and children. For some upper middle-class parents, it will be a jarring experience to see the level of wealth your kiddos peers have. Some families will struggle to enroll siblings in the same school, yet will watch big names in the community waltz all 5 of their children through the admissions process without any effort.

Furthermore, as you progress into the upper school environments of many of these schools, don't for a second think that many of these older children don't flaunt their wealth and sense of entitlement. They are still learning how to integrate themselves in the world, yet many of them expect that a new BMW is a right of passage when getting their drivers license.

I speak from experience because I have two children who attended top private schools in Texas last year and are re-enrolled to start again next year (we did a "hiatus" out of state in the northwest for a year). I've seen it first hand, and even though our household is very wealthy, we choose to not play those games of flaunting wealth - our donations are always marked anonymous and our wealth is subdued as much as possible.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-03-2014, 02:20 PM
 
1,212 posts, read 1,925,241 times
Reputation: 1074
Quote:
Originally Posted by frenzyrider View Post
How can it not be an issue for folks who are middle class and are sacrificing a new car or vacation for their kids' tuition? More than parents it is hard for a kid to deal with that especially in high school. How do I know? My parents were middle-class and sacrificed a ton in vacation, house, etc. but at school I was constantly reminded of how to get along with kids of rich parents. I am not talking about bullying but things you can never be part of the conversation because you don't "roll" like that. In fact, it creates a feeling of scarcity in kids and I remember I often ended up asking my parents "why can't we have a party like that or why can't we go there or why can't we buy this, etc". Luckily we had more than half the class from middle income families so I was able to make great friends but the kid recognizes and feels that dynamic very deeply...
I think it takes a special person not to have real jealous feelings. That is why I referenced the single family that does not appear to have those feelings verse the multitude of jealous parents. I worked with an assistant (single mom) who sent her child to St. Marks. She was not jealous of the other parents, but just happy that as a single mom she was providing her son the best education in DFW.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-03-2014, 02:33 PM
 
244 posts, read 320,805 times
Reputation: 205
I've read and talked to others who say the jealousy thing is a bit less at the more prestigious private schools than say in HPISD. The gist of what was conveyed was that children at the more prestigious schools have less to prove, money is just a fact of life for most, and as long as you've got on a big tshirt and a pair of athletic shorts (for girls) or t-shirt and khaki shorts (for guys), you just go along with your social core (athlete's, dancers, geeks). Yes this is simplistic, but for some reason it made sense to me.

To wax a little bleeding heart liberal, I'm starting to feel as if my child going to one of the privates would be other kids pulling my kid up, while if we go public, it will be our family able to help pull other kids up. I think I will be less resentful of the latter, but I'm not sure if it's best for my child.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-03-2014, 03:16 PM
 
Location: Dallas, TX
2,828 posts, read 3,696,797 times
Reputation: 1821
Quote:
Originally Posted by alastrian2 View Post
I've read and talked to others who say the jealousy thing is a bit less at the more prestigious private schools than say in HPISD. The gist of what was conveyed was that children at the more prestigious schools have less to prove, money is just a fact of life for most, and as long as you've got on a big tshirt and a pair of athletic shorts (for girls) or t-shirt and khaki shorts (for guys), you just go along with your social core (athlete's, dancers, geeks). Yes this is simplistic, but for some reason it made sense to me.

To wax a little bleeding heart liberal, I'm starting to feel as if my child going to one of the privates would be other kids pulling my kid up, while if we go public, it will be our family able to help pull other kids up. I think I will be less resentful of the latter, but I'm not sure if it's best for my child.
See I see that completely different. HPISD would have less economically diverse kids then some of the elite privates along with an almost all white student body. The Elite privates give scholarships and aid to the less affluent smart kids this you would have a wider array of family backgrounds at the privates than HPISD. Money is just a fact of like for 90%+ of the kids at HPISD.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Dallas
View detailed profiles of:
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top