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Old 06-03-2014, 06:09 AM
 
206 posts, read 298,647 times
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Hi all. I will be relocating in the next 60 days to Dallas from Kentucky and bringing my 50 lb lab mix with me. She is 3.5 years old. I don't consider her to be very heat tolerant. Probably a little bit below average. She has average hair length. She is an indoor dog (except for walks and potty breaks). However we do walk quite a bit. 1-1.5 miles during the week and 2-2.5 miles on the weekend. We usually walk between 6 and 8pm on the weekdays and the weekend varies. My question is (especially for people who may have moved from a cooler climate) how did your dog adjust to the heat? Will I need to reduce my walk time right away or do you think she will adjust? Or will we just wind up having to stay indoors a lot in the summer? How many continuous months of 80+ degree days (high) are there doing the year? Do most people walk their dogs at night in Dallas during the summer? Is it safe to walk at night? Are most parks and trails lighted at night? I will be living in North Dallas in an apartment. Either Addison, Richardson, Plano, or Las Colinas. I understand there are a few dog parks with lakes there so maybe she'll become an avid swimmer. Right now she just wades. Any tips would be helpful.
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Old 06-03-2014, 07:38 AM
 
Location: Dallas TX
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We moved from the east coast last year. So far she has adjusted well. She is definitely an indoor dog, has tried swimming and hated it. I was worried as well, but she is doing great! She'll even go for a very short walk at high noon for a potty break.

When there was an ice storm last year, our puppy was thrilled! She loves the cold so was outside for awhile frolicking about.
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Old 06-03-2014, 10:28 AM
 
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The late afternoon/early evening can be the hottest part of the day here. Dogs overheat pretty easily as they can only sweat from their paws. In the middle of the summer it can still be close to 100 at 6 pm and the sidewalk will be IMO really HOT on your dog's paws. I think anything but a short walk at that time will be too much for your dog. Mornings are a much better time to walk them for any distance. She absolutely will need time to adjust to the heat when she first arrives. So unless you're walking her in the early morning, I'd cut back on the distance/time.

If you have to walk her in the evening I would aim for closer to 8 but it can still be 95 degrees so you'll need to make sure she doesn't overheat.

Good luck with your move.
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Old 06-03-2014, 12:18 PM
 
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Thanks. Sounds brutally hot. I hope she adjusts to being indoors more. What about lighted parks and trails for late evening walking?
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Old 06-03-2014, 01:07 PM
 
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It's less brutal right as the sun starts setting. During the summer, that's one of the most popular times for dog parks. The officially close at sundown, but in my experience, nobody is standing there at the gate with a stopwatch.

Early morning is also a good time for longer walks.

Yes, it's a time when outdoor activities are curtailed, but weather can be really great for the rest of the year (with a few cold days here and there)
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Old 06-03-2014, 02:29 PM
 
Location: Dallas, TX and Las Vegas, NV
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Campion Trail in Las Colinas is very shady. Lots of dogs are walked there. Always bring water for your dog on hot days.
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Old 06-03-2014, 03:29 PM
 
Location: Dallas, TX
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Also DO NOT, and I repeat DO NOT leave your car unattended in your car in Dallas(especially in summer). People will break your windows out to rescue the dog. I've gotten close before.
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Old 06-03-2014, 05:28 PM
 
Location: North Texas
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If you're wondering if it's too hot to walk your dog, take your own shoes off and see how hot the pavement is. If it's too hot for you, it's too hot for your dog. You can train your dog to walk on the grass instead of the sidewalk; that's how I walk my dog when it's hot outside. He walks on the parkway, not on the neighbors' lawns. We'll even walk on the sunny side to avoid pooping on the lawn. I figure the parkway is preferable, even though I always pick up after him.

Some things to be aware of:
  • Some condo associations, HOAs, and apartment complexes here require you to submit a sample from your dog for DNA profiling so they can nail you if you leave your dog's droppings on the ground. Be prepared for that!
  • Flea/tick control: YEAR-ROUND here. Don't take the winter off. Consider treating your yard too if you have one. I treat my yard periodically during the summer because the trashy people behind me do not treat their giant horse-dogs for fleas/ticks.
  • Grooming: My little guy (a Maltese mix) does not shed, so he just got his summer haircut over the weekend. I have him clipped down to peach fuzz. He looks silly, but he's much more comfortable like that when it's hot outside. A Lab sheds a LOT, and it'll shed even more when it's hot outside. Regular baths and combings are a must. It also helps with fleas/ticks. I haven't seen shaved Labradors in this neighborhood, but some people shave their long-haired dogs in summer.
  • Water: It's hotter here, so your dog's water needs will be greater. If you're taking your dog out and about with you, there are collapsible/inflatable portable water dishes you can buy. If you're walking your dog around the park, pause to let your dog have a drink. If you're thirsty, your dog probably is too. Some parks have dog-level water fountains, but my dog is freaked out by them and won't drink from them. If we're out for an extended period of time, I bring a dish especially for him and fill it from the park fountain, then set it on the ground and let him drink. Or I bring a thermal container with ice in it; he loves to eat ice. If you shop at Whole Foods any, load up on their free ice before you leave. My dog loves it when I dump the bags out on the lawn; he eats half of it before it ever gets a chance to melt into the lawn and water my grass a little.
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Old 06-04-2014, 12:22 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisPlano View Post
It's less brutal right as the sun starts setting. During the summer, that's one of the most popular times for dog parks. The officially close at sundown, but in my experience, nobody is standing there at the gate with a stopwatch.
Actually, to echo Rowan123, both the ground and ambient temps are at their worst approaching and around sunset, i.e. 7-9 PM. Check historical records. That's when the sun has had all day to heat stuff up. In especially hot summers, it's not unusual to have temps in the high 90's as late as midnight. "Coolest" (relative term) temps are usually around 6-7 AM, when the sun's been awol a few hours.
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Old 06-04-2014, 07:57 PM
 
206 posts, read 298,647 times
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I always take care not to even have my dog in the car when its super hot. I can't believe idiots who leave their dogs in hot cars or hot yards for that matter. I can talk all day about those idiots. Thanks for all the advice. Maybe I'll get her an indoor playmate or do more doggie daycare. What about lighted parks and trails or lighted dog parks for that matter?
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