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Old 06-21-2014, 11:51 AM
 
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Even though this thread has slightly turned away from the original intent of the OP question, I always found this topic of living in an area with certain ethnic demographic interesting considering I am Asian currently living in Southern Cal in a generally overall diverse place such as Orange County. Growing up in Orange County, there are large pockets of neighborhoods or city that are predominantly Asian, Hispanic or White. With exception of newly arrived immigrants, I never understood why someone who is Asian would want to live in a predominantly Asian neighborhood or same with Hispanic just in order to be around people who look like them.

Now as I am pondering a move to the Dallas area, my ideal demographic for a neighborhood to raise my kids in are around 20% Asian and about 65% White with the rest of other ethnic groups. This is not because I feel like white kids are better raised and have better influence on my kids. It's because I want to prepare my kids for this world where it's not going to be predominantly Asian. I want them to feel comfortable being in a room where not too many people look like them or come from the same background. I want them to experience other cultures and not be afraid to go into certain neighborhoods because they would stick out.
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Old 06-21-2014, 04:39 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Ralyks View Post
Obviously parents who make this choice see other benefits for their children besides merely providing other children with a diverse experience, benefits that they apparently judge outweigh the costs. And typically they give their children a chance to experience their culture through family, friends, mosque (or temple or church), cultural community groups, supplemental religious or cultural or language schooling, etc. When we lived in a predominantly non-Protestant neighborhood, my kids still experienced Protestant culture because I took them to church and church-related activities.

At any rate, I was only addressing the poster who said he wanted to give his own kids a "diverse" experience and noting that mere numerical diversity on paper may not be as sure a way to do that as living in an area that is non-self-segregating.

It sometimes seems to me that the people who talk the most and loudest about how much they value "diversity" are the ones least likely to have actual, close friends of different races and religions. Maybe that's because when you approach someone as a feather to stick in your "look how diverse I am" cap, they are less inclined to want to be friends with you.
When someone of a minority or immigrant background says he's looking for "diversity," he usually means he's looking for others of his group, or at least an environment in which he's not the only person not of the dominant group.

And it's not that easy to give children the "experience" if it means one trip across town two hours a week. In some cases, such as with Hasidic Jews, Hindus and Muslims to some extent, it takes communal immersion.
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Old 06-21-2014, 05:48 PM
 
Location: North Texas
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Originally Posted by Ralph_Kirk View Post
When someone of a minority or immigrant background says he's looking for "diversity," he usually means he's looking for others of his group, or at least an environment in which he's not the only person not of the dominant group.

And it's not that easy to give children the "experience" if it means one trip across town two hours a week. In some cases, such as with Hasidic Jews, Hindus and Muslims to some extent, it takes communal immersion.
It's not just Hasids. Orthodox and many Conservative Jews live near their synagogues because they walk there on Saturdays. They congregate together in neighborhoods for practical reasons as much as a desire to live amongst people like them.

I grew up Conservative and we drove to temple, but my parents have become much more observant as they've aged and they now live within walking distance of their Modern Orthodox congregation. That's why they moved. Their neighborhood has a very high percentage of observant Jewish families. They don't shun their gentile neighbors, though.
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Old 06-21-2014, 06:03 PM
 
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Originally Posted by BigDGeek View Post
It's not just Hasids. Orthodox and many Conservative Jews live near their synagogues because they walk there on Saturdays. They congregate together in neighborhoods for practical reasons as much as a desire to live amongst people like them.

I grew up Conservative and we drove to temple, but my parents have become much more observant as they've aged and they now live within walking distance of their Modern Orthodox congregation. That's why they moved. Their neighborhood has a very high percentage of observant Jewish families. They don't shun their gentile neighbors, though.
If there are food requirements, it can be a major issue driving across town to find food. It's also an issue raising kids if none of their friends in the neighborhood has the same dietary requirements, and everyone except your kid can go to McDonalds. If there are at least one or two other kids with the same dietary restrictions, it's much easier, and if there is a restaurant or two in the neighborhood that caters to your dietary restrictions, it's much easier.
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Old 06-21-2014, 06:14 PM
 
Location: North Texas
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Originally Posted by Ralph_Kirk View Post
If there are food requirements, it can be a major issue driving across town to find food. It's also an issue raising kids if none of their friends in the neighborhood has the same dietary requirements, and everyone except your kid can go to McDonalds. If there are at least one or two other kids with the same dietary restrictions, it's much easier, and if there is a restaurant or two in the neighborhood that caters to your dietary restrictions, it's much easier.
There are ways around that, though. Vegan and vegetarian cuisine is almost always kosher by default. A lot of packaged food and dairy sold in the US is almost always certified kosher unless it contains non-kosher ingredients (marshmallows, for example). Even if you don't have a dedicated kosher market nearby, it isn't really difficult to keep kosher here.

Plus, most Jewish people do not keep kosher to the extent that they would refuse to eat at McDonald's for religious reasons. Orthodox people who keep kosher kitchens are still very much the exception here. Some Conservatives try to keep fully kosher, others don't. Many Reform Jews (such as myself) keep kosher to the extent that we refuse to eat obviously non-kosher foods like cheeseburgers, pork, shellfish, etc. I won't eat beef or poultry in a restaurant, but I will eat a salad, vegetables, and fish. My kitchen is not kosher.
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Old 06-22-2014, 09:06 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Ralph_Kirk View Post
When someone of a minority or immigrant background says he's looking for "diversity," he usually means he's looking for others of his group, or at least an environment in which he's not the only person not of the dominant group.
Very true as we have seen in the numerous "looking for diversity" threads on here. Those parents are usually 1st generation and don't speak fluent English. Wanting their kids to grow up with people of their own culture is just an excuse. It is the parents themselves who doesn't feel comfortable not being around the culture they are used to and want to be surrounded by people of their own race. Don't we just love being an adult and having the ability to BS? lol

And when more Americanized parents (1.5 or 2nd generation) say they are "looking for diversity" it usually means they are looking for about 10-20% their own race and EVERYBODY else preferably white!

Last edited by aznkobee; 06-22-2014 at 09:53 AM..
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Old 06-22-2014, 01:01 PM
 
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Originally Posted by BigDGeek View Post
They don't shun their gentile neighbors, though.
they dont embrace their goy neighbors either
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Old 06-22-2014, 01:02 PM
 
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Originally Posted by aznkobee View Post
Very true as we have seen in the numerous "looking for diversity" threads on here. Those parents are usually 1st generation and don't speak fluent English. Wanting their kids to grow up with people of their own culture is just an excuse. It is the parents themselves who doesn't feel comfortable not being around the culture they are used to and want to be surrounded by people of their own race. Don't we just love being an adult and having the ability to BS? lol

And when more Americanized parents (1.5 or 2nd generation) say they are "looking for diversity" it usually means they are looking for about 10-20% their own race and EVERYBODY else preferably white!
tribalism is alive and well
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Old 06-22-2014, 01:14 PM
 
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Originally Posted by burber View Post
tribalism is alive and well
WASP is also a tribe...which not everyone wants to join.

Some Muslims like the whole Islam thing. Some Jews like like the whole Jewish thing. Some Hindus like the whole Hinduism thing.

"There ain't no shame in that."
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Old 06-22-2014, 03:20 PM
 
Location: North Texas
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Originally Posted by burber View Post
they dont embrace their goy neighbors either
It's a two-way street, burber. A lot of gentiles don't reach out to Orthodox Jews because they assume they don't want anything to do with them, or because they dress differently.
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