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Old 03-03-2018, 09:28 AM
 
12,451 posts, read 12,177,409 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UnfairPark View Post
True that. It is funny how people think its too complicated to fill up a pool. To be fair, most internet posters never owned a pool or never had one installed or removed so taking their advice is like taking someone's advice about your bypass surgery because his second cousin, twice removed, had a heart attack in 1998.
Filling in a pool isn't complicated at all. Around here doing so properly is, however, not cheap.
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Old 03-03-2018, 09:29 AM
 
12,451 posts, read 12,177,409 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by speedyg View Post
Conventional wisdom is that a pool adds no value on resale. When I was buying a house a few years ago, I would have subtracted $30k from the house price if it had a pool. I do know other people want them.
That shows you what conventional wisdom is worth. My home's appraisal notes our pool and associates a tidy value with it.
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Old 03-03-2018, 11:34 AM
 
3,762 posts, read 2,948,979 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by speedyg View Post
Conventional wisdom is that a pool adds no value on resale. When I was buying a house a few years ago, I would have subtracted $30k from the house price if it had a pool. I do know other people want them.
Uh, no. Pools add value to a home. As far as investments go, a pool will only bring you about a 30-40% return for resale, which is why it's always much more cost effective to buy a home with a pool than put one in yourself.

But either way, pools add value to a home. That's how the appraisers see it, that's how everyone sees it. Whether you are willing to pay for it is another story entirely.
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Old 03-04-2018, 11:36 AM
 
95 posts, read 93,946 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katana49 View Post
Uh, no. Pools add value to a home. As far as investments go, a pool will only bring you about a 30-40% return for resale, which is why it's always much more cost effective to buy a home with a pool than put one in yourself.

But either way, pools add value to a home. That's how the appraisers see it, that's how everyone sees it. Whether you are willing to pay for it is another story entirely.

Really?? I thought the same thing. When we looked for a house with a pool, it was priced the same as ones without it. Well, originally it wasn't, but what we ended up offering was the same per square foot as a no pool house. Our realtor said it adds very very little overall value to the house. Maybe 10K on a 60K pool. You get a pool for yourself not as an investment. That's why when looking for a house, a pool was a must. Let the sellers take that initial pool cost hit.
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Old 03-04-2018, 12:45 PM
 
12,451 posts, read 12,177,409 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vailbaby View Post
Really?? I thought the same thing. When we looked for a house with a pool, it was priced the same as ones without it. Well, originally it wasn't, but what we ended up offering was the same per square foot as a no pool house. Our realtor said it adds very very little overall value to the house. Maybe 10K on a 60K pool. You get a pool for yourself not as an investment. That's why when looking for a house, a pool was a must. Let the sellers take that initial pool cost hit.
I would agree that almost no one builds a residential pool as a long term investment vehicle.

However, I've built enough pools and sold enough homes with pools to know that's your realtor's assessment is way to bleak. Katana's ~40% thing is about right. Now maybe among lower priced homes your realtor's point would hold but around here only then.

Following the advice of our first realtor years ago.........when a house we own is being shown for sale we open every blind, shutter, curtain, crank the AC to about 68, turn on music inside and outside, turn on outside TVs, turn on the theater projector, turn the pool on full blast making as much splashing, gurgling and best yet waterfall or spa spillway noise as possible.
Seems to work well.
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Old 03-05-2018, 07:31 AM
 
Location: Frisco, TX
435 posts, read 1,619,977 times
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Well, we have went and looked at a couple more homes this weekend and this doesn't get any easier..

Realtor is recommending a combination of options, but seems to gradually be attempting to gravitate us away from focusing in 75093 given our criteria (keep in mind, we live in 75093 now). Ultimately not sure how I feel about it because we really like the area.

A couple of the options we have:

1. We saw a couple of nice homes near Stonebriar Country Club. This would be Frisco, TX address, but many of these homes seem to zone to Lewisville ISD/Hebron. What is going on with that?
2. Possibly build ourselves in far West Frisco (think Phillips Creek Ranch area). Many lots that could meet our criteria in our price range, possibly even give us a larger yard than what we originally wanted depending on the floor plan. Still would meet our commute options (within 30-45 mins of DNT/GB). Have gotten a little spoiled with being in the "plano bubble" so worried a bit about Frisco, Frisco ISD's buildout strategy and property taxes in the coming years.
3. There is apparently a new home community going up later this spring that will zone to West Plano. Builder is Cal-Atlantic, which I haven't seen frequently recommended on this board. Lot size would only be viable if we were able to get one slightly larger than the average (seems to be 55' x 115' mostly, which is smaller than what we currently have).
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Old 03-05-2018, 11:25 AM
 
95 posts, read 93,946 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EDS_ View Post
I would agree that almost no one builds a residential pool as a long term investment vehicle.

However, I've built enough pools and sold enough homes with pools to know that's your realtor's assessment is way to bleak. Katana's ~40% thing is about right. Now maybe among lower priced homes your realtor's point would hold but around here only then.

Following the advice of our first realtor years ago.........when a house we own is being shown for sale we open every blind, shutter, curtain, crank the AC to about 68, turn on music inside and outside, turn on outside TVs, turn on the theater projector, turn the pool on full blast making as much splashing, gurgling and best yet waterfall or spa spillway noise as possible.
Seems to work well.

Well, that's great to hear! I was a bit surprised as well when he mentioned that ( and I know nothing about pools and all that...just assumed it was an "addition" that got taken into account with pricing).
We don't have an appraisal yet so I'll be curious to see what it is.
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Old 03-05-2018, 02:54 PM
 
3,680 posts, read 3,168,814 times
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I was talking to a reltor about this topic and he advice buyers to look at all available homes within their price range in their targeted area and if they like a home but dont want a pool then ask for an allowance to fill it up. In his experience, if buyer is solid and offer is reasonable, most sellers agree to give $5-8k allowance. What's funny is that most of those buyers ended up keeping the pool and using money to renovate it. In his professional opinion, only a fool would let go of a nice and well priced home in a desireable area because, "but it has a pool".
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Old 03-05-2018, 04:50 PM
 
Location: Fort Worth, TX
2,151 posts, read 1,426,025 times
Reputation: 3174
If you're worried about safety it's not very expensive to get a removable safety fence installed around your pool. My husband wanted a pool and I didn't. He won but I insisted on having a safety fence installed before we moved in. At the time our oldest son was 18 months old. The fence is very secure but so easy to remove I can do it by myself. When you remove it it rolls up out of the way and you put caps in the ground that match your pool decking. We currently don't have the fence up because our house is on the market and you can't even tell that there was a fence.
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Old 03-07-2018, 12:01 PM
 
3,478 posts, read 5,859,553 times
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Saw this on a local Facebook group for my town. Someone was asking for advice on this subject and someone chimed in with their experience. Seemed relevant:

Quote:
I cannot describe the whole process in this format, but it is a big project and expensive, the equipment is larger than I thought it would be. They tear up the yard and take down a portion of the fence. Providing access for their equipment is the first big hurdle and it has to be permitted by the city. When you sell the home you must disclose that you had a pool removed and if you do not remove all the material then that area can never be built on, so I had all the concrete material hauled off by them. You can look for demolition companies to do the work. I found that well-established concrete companies tend to get into the concrete demolition because they come across that work in their normal course of business and develop that as another line of work. Apparently tearing out old concrete is common for companies before they can pour new concrete on a lot of jobs. They demo the pool haul off debris and will backfill and compact the backfill for you and nothing else. You will need other companies to disconnect pool equipment, plumbing, electricity and cap or terminate all those things properly . Then you will need another company to add topsoil and do final grade and tie into your existing sprinkler system with a new station and sprinkler heads to water that old pool area. You will need sod installed over the pool area and anywhere their machines operated. I suggest you mark remove and plug any sprinkler bodies in their path of operation so when they finish you can reinstall your sprinkler heads. Their machines will make ruts in your yard wherever they go even if they put down plywood first.
That sounds like a huge PITA
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