U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Dallas
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Closed Thread Start New Thread
 
Old 01-14-2010, 11:16 AM
 
16,086 posts, read 39,259,663 times
Reputation: 6336

Advertisements

Texas Education Code - Section 51.968. Undergraduate Course Credit For High School Students Completing Postsecondary-Level Program - Texas Attorney Resources - Texas Laws

(g) Except as otherwise provided by this subsection, an
institution of higher education shall grant at least 24 semester
credit hours or equivalent course credit in appropriate subject
areas to an entering freshman student for successful completion of
the International Baccalaureate Diploma Program. The institution
may grant fewer than 24 semester credit hours if the student
received a score of less than four on an examination administered as
part of the diploma program. The institution may grant fewer credit
hours only with respect to courses that are substantially related
to the subject of that examination.
Rate this post positively

 
Old 01-14-2010, 01:14 PM
 
Location: Dallas, TX
2,346 posts, read 6,551,156 times
Reputation: 2321
Unexpected 's comments jibe almost completely with my second-hand reports from the IB program in the PISD.

For a 9th or 10th grader, going into the IB program is probably the most difficult academic track available.

For an 11th or 12th grader, you run into frustrations and limitations set by the myriad requirements of the IB program. As unexpected pointed out, a techno-nerd will find it difficult or impossible to take a full set of classes playing to his/her strengths. I had a neighbor whose son bailed on IB and enrolled at TAMS in Denton for 11th and 12th grades. Others left for one or more of the other reasons listed by unexpected. I only know one person whose kid actually got the IB diploma.

---

I agree with earlier posters that you lose nothing by beginning in the IB program. You can always bail if it's not your cup of tea.

---

I strongly disagree with those claiming that AP classes are designed or used to allow the whites (and Asians) to hide from the blacks and Hispanics. At least in PISD, teachers are "encouraged" to boost enrollment of blacks and Hispanics in the AP classes and in the PACE (G/T) program.

I'm not going to deny that PTA moms don't use their influence to get Li'l Johnny/Jenny into the "smart" class. But any black kid who's halfway sharp will get a free pass into the class as well.

The big problem with AP classes in PISD is that they generate a substantial GPA boost, so you get a fair number of underprepared kids in there thinking (wrongly) that this class will help their GPA. Not when you pull a 75 in it, it won't.
Rate this post positively
 
Old 01-14-2010, 02:17 PM
 
6,578 posts, read 24,366,625 times
Reputation: 3235
Here's why Richardson ISD got rid of their IB program, which seems consistent with above comments about IB in general.

International Baccalaureate Program

Are there any plans to introduce the International Baccalaureate Program in RISD schools?

This program used to be offered at Richardson High School and was discontinued in favor of pre-Advanced Placement and AP opportunities.

There are several reasons it was discontinued:

Because the teachers involved in the program require specialized training, the cost of maintaining the program was extremely expensive.

The program requires an extensive level of rigor over an extended period of time. The rigor generally precludes students from participating in any other extracurricular opportunities, and that affected the program’s popularity.

Because of the rigor and time commitment involved, in its 10 years of existence, no RHS student ever graduated with an IB diploma. Students would begin the program but discontinue it before all requirements were satisfied.

RISD is examining the possibility of reintroducing the IB program in some capacity if a cost-effective method of doing so can be found. As part of this, the district is studying the implementation and effectiveness of this program in other districts.
Rate this post positively
 
Old 01-14-2010, 02:57 PM
 
625 posts, read 1,841,202 times
Reputation: 485
ah...TAMS...that's an entirely separate topic I could go on about...

just to add, there's no magic button you have to push to get into an AP class. It's pretty much as simple as signing up for it.

You'll find a lot of under-prepared people in the AP English/History courses...I never saw any "white flight" into the AP Science courses...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Big G View Post
Unexpected 's comments jibe almost completely with my second-hand reports from the IB program in the PISD.

For a 9th or 10th grader, going into the IB program is probably the most difficult academic track available.

For an 11th or 12th grader, you run into frustrations and limitations set by the myriad requirements of the IB program. As unexpected pointed out, a techno-nerd will find it difficult or impossible to take a full set of classes playing to his/her strengths. I had a neighbor whose son bailed on IB and enrolled at TAMS in Denton for 11th and 12th grades. Others left for one or more of the other reasons listed by unexpected. I only know one person whose kid actually got the IB diploma.

---

I agree with earlier posters that you lose nothing by beginning in the IB program. You can always bail if it's not your cup of tea.

---

I strongly disagree with those claiming that AP classes are designed or used to allow the whites (and Asians) to hide from the blacks and Hispanics. At least in PISD, teachers are "encouraged" to boost enrollment of blacks and Hispanics in the AP classes and in the PACE (G/T) program.

I'm not going to deny that PTA moms don't use their influence to get Li'l Johnny/Jenny into the "smart" class. But any black kid who's halfway sharp will get a free pass into the class as well.

The big problem with AP classes in PISD is that they generate a substantial GPA boost, so you get a fair number of underprepared kids in there thinking (wrongly) that this class will help their GPA. Not when you pull a 75 in it, it won't.
Rate this post positively
 
Old 01-14-2010, 03:03 PM
 
9,418 posts, read 12,574,065 times
Reputation: 10278
Quote:
Originally Posted by unexpected View Post
ah...TAMS...that's an entirely separate topic I could go on about...

just to add, there's no magic button you have to push to get into an AP class. It's pretty much as simple as signing up for it.

You'll find a lot of under-prepared people in the AP English/History courses...I never saw any "white flight" into the AP Science courses...
TAMS? Just trying to follow along here as I have a 12 year old and we're always trying to stay on top of all education opportunities.
She is very strong in Language Arts/Reading, also Science. Science has always been her favorite subject and interest and it seems, at least from these postings, that IB may not be the place for someone who leans that way?
Rate this post positively
 
Old 01-14-2010, 03:05 PM
 
6,578 posts, read 24,366,625 times
Reputation: 3235
TAMS Home, University of North Texas

TAMS website
Rate this post positively
 
Old 01-14-2010, 03:09 PM
 
Location: The Big D
14,862 posts, read 40,526,295 times
Reputation: 5787
One of the kids from GHS that was full IB is there now. He studies ALL THE TIME!!!! He came in from special events at the school but they literally have NO TIME for ANYTHING that does not involve school. You actually live on campus (UNT in Denton) and participate in the program.

Kids in full IB can participate in other activities. It just takes dedication and no procrastinating assignments. There was a full IB grad recently that was in band and on the soccer team. There are a lot of kids at my daughters school that are partial IB and participate in other programs.
Rate this post positively
 
Old 01-14-2010, 03:12 PM
 
9,418 posts, read 12,574,065 times
Reputation: 10278
Quote:
Originally Posted by FarNorthDallas View Post

OH! Thank you so much. I read TAMS and thought it was something along the lines of IB, AP, TAKS, etc... . LOL. Thanks again!
Rate this post positively
 
Old 01-14-2010, 03:12 PM
 
625 posts, read 1,841,202 times
Reputation: 485
TAMS is a program at UNT where you finish up high school (11th and 12th grade) at UNT. It's a pretty sophisticated interview process to get in (requires taking the SAT, writing essays, etc- good practice for college!)

Pros: Excellent math and science education. You will also have two years of real, solid college credit. You can easily transfer it to UT, and finish up in two years. Some guys stay at UT, and graduate in a year.

Cons: Really competitive, at such a young age. You're away from home. Totally draconian rules (internet shuts off after 10 pm, no girls in guys room, no cars until the last semester, etc. I had a friend EXPELLED b/c his music was too loud - of course his last in a long series of indiscretions). Absolutely no extracurriculars- no theater, no sports, no art, etc.

I haven't seen a real correlation between going to TAMS and going to Ivy League caliber schools. Kids seemed to get in at about the same rate. Most kids end up at UT, graduating a year or two ahead of schedule.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TXNGL View Post
TAMS? Just trying to follow along here as I have a 12 year old and we're always trying to stay on top of all education opportunities.
She is very strong in Language Arts/Reading, also Science. Science has always been her favorite subject and interest and it seems, at least from these postings, that IB may not be the place for someone who leans that way?
Rate this post positively
 
Old 01-14-2010, 03:13 PM
 
9,418 posts, read 12,574,065 times
Reputation: 10278
Quote:
Originally Posted by momof2dfw View Post
One of the kids from GHS that was full IB is there now. He studies ALL THE TIME!!!! He came in from special events at the school but they literally have NO TIME for ANYTHING that does not involve school. You actually live on campus (UNT in Denton) and participate in the program.

Kids in full IB can participate in other activities. It just takes dedication and no procrastinating assignments. There was a full IB grad recently that was in band and on the soccer team. There are a lot of kids at my daughters school that are partial IB and participate in other programs.
Oh gosh. No thanks!
Rate this post positively
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Closed Thread


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Dallas
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2022, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top