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Old 01-21-2015, 10:48 PM
 
Location: London, UK
94 posts, read 122,806 times
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I do care of my DD by scheduling her routines and I prefer her to give more time to brush her teeth twice a day with fluoride toothpaste. In our kids childhood, as responsible parents we should take of our kids health and also make good nutritious foods.
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Old 01-22-2015, 08:28 AM
 
2,382 posts, read 4,709,983 times
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My young nephew ended up with a mouthful of cavities, this happened right before my daughter's teeth came in and freaked me out. I counldn't imagine having to have my toddler sedated, teeth drilled and some extracted, plus spacers put in.

Then I started going to mom's groups and was shocked at the amount of cavities and, frankly, how nonchalant the moms were about them. These were educated, upper middle class moms.

My husband and I both have not great teeth as adults. We both grew up poor so poor nutrition (calcium poor diets), rural well water (no fluoride), no dental insurance and with parents too proud to take advantage of free care. So we both had a number of cavities, teeth repeated filled which as adults progressed to crowns and now in our forties - a few implants.

My daughter has a electric toothbrush - thanks for the recommendation RDH35, I might get her a new one. We also use a air flosser. I think mom or dad doing the flossing is needed, my daughter still doesn't have ability to do a through job at 4.5yo.

Another thing my daughter's dentist mentioned is that alot of times the parents seems to have no idea what's going on in their kids mouths. Sounds like the case with the OP ( I think she said they found 11 cavities in the first visit!). I have her tip her mouth back so I can look really good after she brushes and take a peek with the dental mirror every few days.
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Old 01-22-2015, 08:56 AM
 
258 posts, read 592,773 times
Reputation: 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bakeneko View Post
My young nephew ended up with a mouthful of cavities, this happened right before my daughter's teeth came in and freaked me out. I counldn't imagine having to have my toddler sedated, teeth drilled and some extracted, plus spacers put in.

Then I started going to mom's groups and was shocked at the amount of cavities and, frankly, how nonchalant the moms were about them. These were educated, upper middle class moms.

My husband and I both have not great teeth as adults. We both grew up poor so poor nutrition (calcium poor diets), rural well water (no fluoride), no dental insurance and with parents too proud to take advantage of free care. So we both had a number of cavities, teeth repeated filled which as adults progressed to crowns and now in our forties - a few implants.

My daughter has a electric toothbrush - thanks for the recommendation RDH35, I might get her a new one. We also use a air flosser. I think mom or dad doing the flossing is needed, my daughter still doesn't have ability to do a through job at 4.5yo.

Another thing my daughter's dentist mentioned is that alot of times the parents seems to have no idea what's going on in their kids mouths. Sounds like the case with the OP ( I think she said they found 11 cavities in the first visit!). I have her tip her mouth back so I can look really good after she brushes and take a peek with the dental mirror every few days.
Bakeneko, Which air flosser do you use? Does she use this everyday instead of the regular flossing method? I am sometimes a little hesitant to get him to floss well since my previous dentist mentioned that it might pull off the crown - not sure if this true? Air flosser might be better although I don't know if it as effective.
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Old 01-22-2015, 10:06 AM
 
2,382 posts, read 4,709,983 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tango14 View Post
Bakeneko, Which air flosser do you use? Does she use this everyday instead of the regular flossing method? I am sometimes a little hesitant to get him to floss well since my previous dentist mentioned that it might pull off the crown - not sure if this true? Air flosser might be better although I don't know if it as effective.
We have the sonic care brand flossers, rechargable. Although I think there might be flossers on the market just for kids? I use mouthwash in mine but plain water in my daughter's.

I also use a manual flosser - we travel alot and are away from our home alot too. I buy the kid sizer pick one as it's just too hard to get in her little mouth with regular string floss. No reason you cant manual floss everything around the crown?

When we are out and about if she has something sticky/sweet and we can't brush, I try to get her to at least drink some water or eat something crunchy like baby carrots.

What my husband and I go thru because of our childhoods is both painful and very expensive so I am a little OCDish about my daughter's teeth, I guess. I had one tooth that had been filled so many times that one day it just crumbled like a sandcastle.

I also have hereditary tendency towards gum recession so I have my teeth cleaned every three months rather than every six.

Anyway - the old adage about "an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure" is very true about dental work.
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Old 01-22-2015, 10:36 AM
 
Location: The Netherlands
4,294 posts, read 3,272,318 times
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My daughter had cavities too and your child has gum infection take your child to the dentist asap before it become more worst and guide to a serious trouble. Wash the child's mouth more often with fluoride water.
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Old 01-22-2015, 11:05 AM
 
Location: Scott County, Tennessee/by way of Detroit
3,330 posts, read 2,274,687 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RDH35 View Post
I am a dental hygienist BTW and IMHO, sealants are a VERY good idea for your child given his history. Since his adult molars are "untouched" so far, placing sealants on them will go a long way towards helping to keep them cavity free. HOWEVER, it will not prevent cavities from occurring between the teeth. That requires flossing.

My recommendations, are to really monitor his brushing, ESPECIALLY at night. Nighttime brushing is vital for kids. Let him floss, then you follow up.Let him brush, then you brush. Get him a good electric toothbrush. Sonicare has a great kid's brush that chimes when it's time for them to move to a new section of their mouth and signals when it's done brushing. Both of my kid's have them. It takes a lot of the guess work out of the act of brushing.

If your water has fluoride, and he's brushing with a toothpaste that has fluoride, then that is plenty of fluoride.

Does your family all see a Dentist regularly? You mentioned in another of your posts, that you really only go when it's necessary (ie. when something hurts.)

Like anonchick said, she went regularly despite some not so great habits and has had good dental. Going regularly, every six months for a cleaning, and exam helps you prevent tiny cavities from growing into BIG cavities and bleeding gums to periodontal disease.
I second that about the sealants...my son had very soft teeth really white but spotty..our family has deep pockets so I have been told so I had the sealants put on when he was young and he has never ever had a cavity...he's 32...They saved his teeth in my opinion....
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Old 01-30-2015, 10:58 PM
 
Location: Ohio
229 posts, read 290,720 times
Reputation: 450
We're careful about teeth in my family. I know all the rules about only drinking water between meals, not juice, and avoiding sticky sweet things like raisins, and the kids only having a small candy treat once a week on a Friday followed by tooth brushing. The kids, whilst small, have a bash at brushing teeth themselves, then adults finish off. We're genuinely good about all this - my kids even luckily adore snacking on raw veggies.

A few years ago, I was congratulating myself on my then almost 10 year old never having had a cavity, which I smugly assumed was down to my careful management. So it was a total shock to take my then 5 year old to the dentist, for her regular 6 monthly check up, and be told that she needs to have virtually all her molars repaired under a general anaesthetic.

It happens; sometimes it's just unlucky genetics, or an infection during pregnancy, perhaps a mild cold at exactly the wrong time that the mother didn't even really register. It's not always casualness on the part of the parents (although that didn't stop the hospital dentist, who didn't know us, talking to me as if I was 12 and lecturing me about cutting out the llollipops my daughter never had, or the soda she never drank as she hated fizzy things... sigh).

But some potentially happy news for you - although her baby teeth were just trash, with the thinnest touch of enamel, and dissolved in front of your eyes, her adult teeth are all in now and seem much stronger *touch wood*. She hasn't actually had a cavity for years (she's almost 11 now). So hopefully your kid's adult ones will be better too.

I don't know if it's connected, but she also got her adult teeth much earlier than her peers - she lost her first baby tooth at just 4, a couple of years before anyone else in her class at school, and had her '12 year' molars all in by around 8. Her adult molars have all been fissure sealed; my son's had this too because apparently it's a useful thing to help them through the teen years of being slack about dental hygiene.

But definitely stay on top of brushing and good food choices, and go for regular check ups, and get any potential abscesses and infections taken care of promptly before they spread. Hopefully the hyper vigilance will just be for a little while, and the adult teeth will be sound.
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Old 01-31-2015, 09:22 PM
 
1,552 posts, read 1,939,048 times
Reputation: 2379
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bakeneko View Post
Please take your child to a dentist. Seriously, my heart hurts for him. Crushed rock salt on an infected tooth? Really?
I agree. Wait until it hurts?? This is neglect and some would argue that Child Protective Services should be called. It's a tough decision though because parental ignorance is rarely intentional.
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