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Old 01-20-2015, 08:44 AM
 
258 posts, read 592,773 times
Reputation: 76

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This post is a little long but I just wanted to give a brief picture of what this is about and then pose my question. So please bear with me.
My 7 year old son has always been prone to cavities. When he was 4, the dentist found about 11 cavities during a routine checkup. Hadn't given him any pain until then ( knock on wood). After much debate, we decided to do some fillings and crowns in 2-3 sittings with just nitrous gas. He is quite patient. He also has fairly healthy eating habits - no juice and too much junk, lots of veggies. My husband and I have not had any major dental issues. He is just more prone , I guess.

We recently had a regular check up for school records : the teeth we decided not to do any thing about - the cavities have grown. But also the ones that had the pulpotomy - those too have failed and need to be worked on again. I don't have much faith in these procedures. After we had those 2-3 sittings, We had decided not to do any work further until , god forbid, he had tooth pain. Sometimes, he does mention that his tooth hurts ( different teeth at different times) and then we use home remedies ( oil pulling, salt rinsing, garlic, onion and sometimes oil of oregano) to keep these at bay.

Now to my query - Recently, his gum above one infected tooth has a swelling ( bright red sometimes) That has us worried. Is that related to the cavity or is it a altogether another issue with the gums? I tried putting some crushed rock salt over it and it subsided a little but wondering if we need to visit the dentist. I keep hearing about infection spreading to the blood and other organs like the heart?

We had done extensive research about these dental issues and I feel it's better to just leave things be - have good food habits ( we also gave fermented cod liver oil for a while) , not go to the dentist until your tooth bothers you but when these things like gum boils crop up, it makes you rethink your decisions. I just wanted some advice here. Thanks .
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Old 01-20-2015, 10:56 AM
 
697 posts, read 646,542 times
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I think the only sensible advice in this case would be to see your Dentist as soon as possible. Once this has been cleared up I think it would be a good idea to find out the cause and address it if possible. I'm guessing the symptoms match up to some of the ones mentioned on this site.

Your diet during pregnancy could also be related as well.
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Old 01-20-2015, 12:08 PM
 
595 posts, read 2,400,965 times
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I just have to ask you a question. Would you allow an infected cut on your child's arm to just "get better" on it's own without going to see a Doctor, because it wasn't painful? I'm baffled why people think a cavity in a baby tooth is no big deal. It's essentially the same thing. A cavity is a bacterial infection of the tooth. By the time pain sets into a tooth, it's typically too late to save the tooth because at that point the infection has reached the pulp of the tooth.

Cavities in baby teeth that are left alone and untreated WILL and CAN infect the permanent tooth underneath. So now, not only is the child in pain, but now you've got a compromised adult tooth that will have to be addressed. Which is why, seeing a Dentist regularly (as in at least once every year) helps prevent these things from becoming bigger issues.

It sounds as if that tooth you are asking about is abscessed and it is VERY important you get your child to a Dentist to have it checked out.

Please, for the sake of your child, please don't wait until something hurts him to get it addressed. Children often don't feel dental pain like adults. Then once they do, it's a pretty big issue involving lots of money and unnecessary pain for the child.
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Old 01-21-2015, 02:22 PM
 
258 posts, read 592,773 times
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Thanks RDH35 and QuestOfTruth. We took an appointment and the dentist recommended extracting the tooth. That is what we did. We still have some other teeth that need crowns or fillings. The dentist also asked us to think about having sealants on the four primary molars that he has and later on the secondary molars as well. Given that he is prone to cavities, this might be a good option. Anybody has any advice on sealants in the long run. Pros and cons? Thanks.
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Old 01-21-2015, 03:56 PM
 
Location: In a house
13,253 posts, read 38,143,135 times
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You mentioned his eating habits - does he drink soda or other carbonated beverages? Does he eat a lot of citrus fruits? Does he brush his teeth every morning and every night before bed, and does he floss? Is he brushing with fluoridated toothpaste? Has he had a fluoride treatment from the dentist yet?
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Old 01-21-2015, 04:16 PM
 
2,382 posts, read 4,709,983 times
Reputation: 3432
Quote:
Originally Posted by tango14 View Post
This post is a little long but I just wanted to give a brief picture of what this is about and then pose my question. So please bear with me.
My 7 year old son has always been prone to cavities. When he was 4, the dentist found about 11 cavities during a routine checkup. Hadn't given him any pain until then ( knock on wood). After much debate, we decided to do some fillings and crowns in 2-3 sittings with just nitrous gas. He is quite patient. He also has fairly healthy eating habits - no juice and too much junk, lots of veggies. My husband and I have not had any major dental issues. He is just more prone , I guess.

We recently had a regular check up for school records : the teeth we decided not to do any thing about - the cavities have grown. But also the ones that had the pulpotomy - those too have failed and need to be worked on again. I don't have much faith in these procedures. After we had those 2-3 sittings, We had decided not to do any work further until , god forbid, he had tooth pain. Sometimes, he does mention that his tooth hurts ( different teeth at different times) and then we use home remedies ( oil pulling, salt rinsing, garlic, onion and sometimes oil of oregano) to keep these at bay.

Now to my query - Recently, his gum above one infected tooth has a swelling ( bright red sometimes) That has us worried. Is that related to the cavity or is it a altogether another issue with the gums? I tried putting some crushed rock salt over it and it subsided a little but wondering if we need to visit the dentist. I keep hearing about infection spreading to the blood and other organs like the heart?

We had done extensive research about these dental issues and I feel it's better to just leave things be - have good food habits ( we also gave fermented cod liver oil for a while) , not go to the dentist until your tooth bothers you but when these things like gum boils crop up, it makes you rethink your decisions. I just wanted some advice here. Thanks .
Please take your child to a dentist. Seriously, my heart hurts for him. Crushed rock salt on an infected tooth? Really?
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Old 01-21-2015, 04:19 PM
 
2,382 posts, read 4,709,983 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnonChick View Post
You mentioned his eating habits - does he drink soda or other carbonated beverages? Does he eat a lot of citrus fruits? Does he brush his teeth every morning and every night before bed, and does he floss? Is he brushing with fluoridated toothpaste? Has he had a fluoride treatment from the dentist yet?
My daughter hasn't had any cavities but her dentist did mention in passing that some of her "healthy" snacks weren't the greatest things for her teeth. Yogurt covered fruits in particular since they are both sweet and sticky.

My daughter will be five this summer and I still brush her teeth for her - she has a go and then dad or I take a turn.
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Old 01-21-2015, 07:12 PM
 
258 posts, read 592,773 times
Reputation: 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnonChick View Post
You mentioned his eating habits - does he drink soda or other carbonated beverages? Does he eat a lot of citrus fruits? Does he brush his teeth every morning and every night before bed, and does he floss? Is he brushing with fluoridated toothpaste? Has he had a fluoride treatment from the dentist yet?
No soda or carbonated beverages. Yes to fruit but nothing to warrant this many cavities. I see many kids eat a LOT of candy and junk - no where near that , yet yes, sometimes, he does eat these things - he is a kid. At one time, I would make him rinse his mouth everytime he ate something but of course that's not very practical. I am not sure about flouride - a toxin? Anyways, where we live, the doc said there's enough in the water. No flouride treatments. I hope his adult teeth are good. Any ideas about sealants? Does anybody have them? Thanks
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Old 01-21-2015, 07:44 PM
 
Location: In a house
13,253 posts, read 38,143,135 times
Reputation: 20198
Fluoride is toxic in high doses - but the amount in a dental treatment is not enough to be considered even close to almost maybe possibly toxic. You also didn't say if he uses a fluoridated toothpaste. If not, he should. Again - not even almost a little bit similar to maybe somewhat toxic.

Again - I ask: Does he brush his teeth? With toothpaste with fluoride in it? Does he floss?

I ate lots of candy when I was a kid, and drank lots of soda, and smoked from the time I was 15 til I was in my 40's, and had two cavities until I was in my late 30's. But my grandfather was my dentist and I had professional dental cleanings once a month throughout my youth. And we used a waterpik with antiseptic mouthwash in the water resevoir at home, in addition to brushing my teeth with fluoridated toothpaste. I didn't floss, and the cavities I did get were between the teeth - exactly where floss should be working dirt out from.
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Old 01-21-2015, 08:37 PM
 
595 posts, read 2,400,965 times
Reputation: 1214
Quote:
Originally Posted by tango14 View Post
No soda or carbonated beverages. Yes to fruit but nothing to warrant this many cavities. I see many kids eat a LOT of candy and junk - no where near that , yet yes, sometimes, he does eat these things - he is a kid. At one time, I would make him rinse his mouth everytime he ate something but of course that's not very practical. I am not sure about flouride - a toxin? Anyways, where we live, the doc said there's enough in the water. No flouride treatments. I hope his adult teeth are good. Any ideas about sealants? Does anybody have them? Thanks
I am a dental hygienist BTW and IMHO, sealants are a VERY good idea for your child given his history. Since his adult molars are "untouched" so far, placing sealants on them will go a long way towards helping to keep them cavity free. HOWEVER, it will not prevent cavities from occurring between the teeth. That requires flossing.

My recommendations, are to really monitor his brushing, ESPECIALLY at night. Nighttime brushing is vital for kids. Let him floss, then you follow up.Let him brush, then you brush. Get him a good electric toothbrush. Sonicare has a great kid's brush that chimes when it's time for them to move to a new section of their mouth and signals when it's done brushing. Both of my kid's have them. It takes a lot of the guess work out of the act of brushing.

If your water has fluoride, and he's brushing with a toothpaste that has fluoride, then that is plenty of fluoride.

Does your family all see a Dentist regularly? You mentioned in another of your posts, that you really only go when it's necessary (ie. when something hurts.)

Like anonchick said, she went regularly despite some not so great habits and has had good dental. Going regularly, every six months for a cleaning, and exam helps you prevent tiny cavities from growing into BIG cavities and bleeding gums to periodontal disease.
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