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Old 05-11-2019, 09:48 AM
 
Location: A safe distance from San Francisco
9,729 posts, read 6,797,753 times
Reputation: 10332

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Quote:
Originally Posted by SanyBelle View Post
But you are 80 years old so if you lose a tooth unexpectedly it's not a problem like it would be for me working/speaking/training in front of clients all day long.
No one is going to lose a tooth visible to clients unexpectedly except by accident/injury. Molars are the ones that can sneak up on you and I've lost 5 of them over the years....as an end result of having most of the tooth drilled away (with no anesthetic) when I was a kid 60 years ago. In hindsight, I don't believe for a moment that all that work was necessary or done for my benefit as much as for the dentist'$.

Nobody would ever know those molars are gone unless I told them/ showed them.
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Old 05-11-2019, 03:30 PM
 
5,634 posts, read 2,466,732 times
Reputation: 11035
Quote:
Originally Posted by CrownVic95 View Post
No one is going to lose a tooth visible to clients unexpectedly except by accident/injury. Molars are the ones that can sneak up on you and I've lost 5 of them over the years....as an end result of having most of the tooth drilled away (with no anesthetic) when I was a kid 60 years ago. In hindsight, I don't believe for a moment that all that work was necessary or done for my benefit as much as for the dentist'$.

Nobody would ever know those molars are gone unless I told them/ showed them.
I have a friend who lost her front tooth top tooth due to resorption in her late 20s. It happens. She has an implant now.
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Old 05-11-2019, 03:42 PM
 
Location: A safe distance from San Francisco
9,729 posts, read 6,797,753 times
Reputation: 10332
Quote:
Originally Posted by RamenAddict View Post
I have a friend who lost her front tooth top tooth due to resorption in her late 20s. It happens. She has an implant now.
So rarely that it is way outside of the context of this discussion. I've never heard of a single case in 69 years.
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Old 05-11-2019, 04:31 PM
 
7,808 posts, read 3,761,162 times
Reputation: 20491
Regular dentist did exrays when it was determined I need a root canal. Fair enough.

Then we agreed after six months to get that tooth pulled. This time I'm sent to a specialist. He wants a pan exray . A whopping 240$. Then he says..best we pull the other tooth beside it.

My regular dentist then took it as an opportunity to do a bridge ...and take another exray! I said ok to the bridge . But he can get the exrays from his specialist buddy.

Spending 400$ for a 6$ image.
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Old 05-11-2019, 06:57 PM
 
1,784 posts, read 1,763,647 times
Reputation: 2701
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nov3 View Post
Regular dentist did exrays when it was determined I need a root canal. Fair enough.

Then we agreed after six months to get that tooth pulled. This time I'm sent to a specialist. He wants a pan exray . A whopping 240$. Then he says..best we pull the other tooth beside it.

My regular dentist then took it as an opportunity to do a bridge ...and take another exray! I said ok to the bridge . But he can get the exrays from his specialist buddy.

Spending 400$ for a 6$ image.
If you have dental insurance kicking in a portion for work, the dentist has to send them an X-ray as proof of 1- need 2- completed work.
X-ray not exray.
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Old 05-12-2019, 02:04 PM
 
27,746 posts, read 19,595,732 times
Reputation: 48906
Quote:
Originally Posted by cb2008 View Post
When you go for your physical does your doctor want an x-ray of your whole body every two years regardless of whether you have problems or not? Often they can treat you without ANY x-rays by examining you, asking you questions.

X-rays are not harmless. To subject your patient, who has a healthy mouth, to x-rays without reason, and refuse to treat them if they don't comply is exploitative.

Not everyone has dental insurance. Medicare does not cover dental care.
Sure you can choose to be a pawn or choose be an intelligent consumer.
Have never had Dental insurance and have always found dentists to be the most reasonably priced and willing g to work with me than other health professions. My yearly exam with xrays was $150, I don’t think that’s bad at all. Teeth and gums can change significantly in a year, rather they catch stuff before it’s a several thousand dollar root canal. You are free to say you only want them every two years.

The majority of people probably don’t have dental insurance, and historically dental insurance has barely covered care costs, so dentists are used to people who have to pay out of pocket and at least mine keeps prices reasonable. My current dentist and others are now offering yearly plans. She charges $199. Year which includes 2 exams including xrays and two cleanings. I think that is more than reasonable.

At least with dentists they will tell you upfront what the costs will be. While medical offices and hospitals leave me with surprise bills all the time. Just recently I had to get a breast ultrasound and second mammogram. They charged me $354 upfront saying it’s cause I didn’t meet my deductible. I paid it, got the tests done, then two weeks later I get another bill from them for $157. They said they forgot to charge me something or other, I’m still not clear but have no choice but to pay it because they’re the only Radiology facility my insurance covers. That has never happened to me with a dentist.
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Old 05-12-2019, 03:14 PM
 
2,900 posts, read 1,631,977 times
Reputation: 12658
Quote:
Originally Posted by cb2008 View Post
When you go for your physical does your doctor want an x-ray of your whole body every two years regardless of whether you have problems or not?

It appears that you don't understand the difference between dental cavities and a physical exam. One requires dental x-rays and one does not.
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Old 05-12-2019, 04:17 PM
 
7,808 posts, read 3,761,162 times
Reputation: 20491
Quote:
Originally Posted by charmed hour View Post
If you have dental insurance kicking in a portion for work, the dentist has to send them an X-ray as proof of 1- need 2- completed work.
X-ray not exray.
Thank you! My phone thanks you too as the spellchecker is getting a good talking to.
No insurance. All cash. Thanks for explaining the process.
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Old 05-12-2019, 08:17 PM
 
Location: Boring suburb in the Northeast
4,476 posts, read 2,125,173 times
Reputation: 4228
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgardener View Post
It appears that you don't understand the difference between dental cavities and a physical exam. One requires dental x-rays and one does not.
When I am asked any problems and I say nope, everything is fine because everything IS fine why is he checking for cavities?
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Old 05-12-2019, 08:54 PM
 
27,746 posts, read 19,595,732 times
Reputation: 48906
Quote:
Originally Posted by cb2008 View Post
When I am asked any problems and I say nope, everything is fine because everything IS fine why is he checking for cavities?
You can’t feel or see cavities until they are far gone and causing pain. I haven’t been able to tell I had most of the cavities I’ve had. Because they catch them early via exam and x-rays. It’s like going to a doctor for a physical, would you expect him to skip the exam and declare you healthy based on you simply saying you feel fine? Medical professionals proclaim you fine or not fine based on a combination of your self report and their skilled exam.

There are things aside from cavities they are looking for in an exam too, oral cancer and gum health probably the most important of the two, plus also they look for areas the enamel is being worn thin, or teeth which are grinding down more in certain areas. Every dentist I go to tells me I grind my teeth when I sleep to the point I’m flattening my teeth down, basically filing them with my teeth. Then they offer a fix for whatever they see, you are free to decline if you wish. I declined the nightime mouth guard because it’s expensive and I doubt I could tolerate it.

Last edited by ocnjgirl; 05-12-2019 at 09:59 PM..
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