U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Health and Wellness > Dental Health
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-04-2019, 03:45 PM
 
15,926 posts, read 33,578,692 times
Reputation: 20261

Advertisements

I want to start by saying that sadly I have been battling more or less a losing battle when it comes to my teeth, for all of my life. Several times over the years I have had "reconstructive type dentistry which has involved extracting a few teeth and many crowns, root canals and bridgework. I am nearly 70 now, and the last time I had major work done was about 8 or 9 years ago, when I went to a general dentist who did a "roundhouse" bridge in my upper jaw. Sadly it was not well made or well fitting and it failed almost immediately by breaking apart in the middle. Despite that I have managed to keep it in my mouth despite always having problems due to poor fit, but it was very expensive and there was no way I could just go somewhere else for a do-over.

Now it is at the point where I MUST have something done - bridge is failing big time (loose, broken) I am getting infection and it is difficult to eat. I will not go back to original dentist, he is not even practicing now I don't think anyway. My question for those of you with experience (or the professionals here) is would it be best to start with a general dentist to evaluate my mouth and options? Or should I go straight to an oral surgeon or prosthodontist to look into impants or implant retained bridges? I am really confused what to do.

One thing for sure, is I will avoid any of those "chains". I think all the good professionals here in my area don't even bother with insurance and probably much of what I need won't be covered anyway.

I appreciate any and all advice.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-04-2019, 04:00 PM
 
3,501 posts, read 1,530,932 times
Reputation: 9477
Ask around for recommendations, then ask the dentist office. Many times they will work with you on payments. You will be happy, that you got it done.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-04-2019, 07:50 PM
 
1,572 posts, read 2,107,995 times
Reputation: 2455
Quote:
Originally Posted by marcandme View Post
Ask around for recommendations, then ask the dentist office. Many times they will work with you on payments. You will be happy, that you got it done.

Many dentists these days will use CareCredit and similar financing plans.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-05-2019, 10:36 AM
 
4,452 posts, read 2,168,093 times
Reputation: 9184
CareCredit is just a way for them to make you think you can "manage" those exorbitant charges. They still get their money up front and you get more debt.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-05-2019, 11:49 AM
 
15,926 posts, read 33,578,692 times
Reputation: 20261
Quote:
Originally Posted by gypsychic View Post
I want to start by saying that sadly I have been battling more or less a losing battle when it comes to my teeth, for all of my life. Several times over the years I have had "reconstructive type dentistry which has involved extracting a few teeth and many crowns, root canals and bridgework. I am nearly 70 now, and the last time I had major work done was about 8 or 9 years ago, when I went to a general dentist who did a "roundhouse" bridge in my upper jaw. Sadly it was not well made or well fitting and it failed almost immediately by breaking apart in the middle. Despite that I have managed to keep it in my mouth despite always having problems due to poor fit, but it was very expensive and there was no way I could just go somewhere else for a do-over.

Now it is at the point where I MUST have something done - bridge is failing big time (loose, broken) I am getting infection and it is difficult to eat. I will not go back to original dentist, he is not even practicing now I don't think anyway. My question for those of you with experience (or the professionals here) is would it be best to start with a general dentist to evaluate my mouth and options? Or should I go straight to an oral surgeon or prosthodontist to look into impants or implant retained bridges? I am really confused what to do.

One thing for sure, is I will avoid any of those "chains". I think all the good professionals here in my area don't even bother with insurance and probably much of what I need won't be covered anyway.

I appreciate any and all advice.
This is my original post - I am not concerned about the payment part of it. I have some savings, a credit card and a line of credit. I am looking for advice as to what type of specialist I should start with to evaluate my mouth - a regular dds, oral surgeon or prosthodontist. Thanks, again.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-05-2019, 01:24 PM
 
1,572 posts, read 2,107,995 times
Reputation: 2455
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYC refugee View Post
CareCredit is just a way for them to make you think you can "manage" those exorbitant charges. They still get their money up front and you get more debt.

CareCredit is a way to give you a loan from a lending institution that knows how to manage loans. Dental offices usually don't want to give loans unless it's a long-term patient they know they can trust.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-08-2019, 03:20 PM
 
615 posts, read 602,096 times
Reputation: 1041
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYC refugee View Post
CareCredit is just a way for them to make you think you can "manage" those exorbitant charges. They still get their money up front and you get more debt.

And???


CareCredit is a great tool to get the work (dental, med, vet, eye) you need. Like any other loan, you just have to manage it responsibly.


I have had dozens of patients get the dental implants they need because of CareCredit or another 3rd party lender. These are hardworking, run-of-the-mill folks who see the value in the treatment they need but just can't make a lump payment of a few thousand dollars because they have other financial obligations that are just a little more important than their teeth. I understand completely. We are happy to offer CareCredit or other financing options to these patients. IF they decide they can fit the monthly payment into their budget, great. If not, at least we gave them the option.


Also, why shouldn't the dentist get their money up front? The dentist has bills just like everyone else. Their staff expects to be paid their entire amount on payday, not a little every month. The rent is due in full on the 1st, not a little every month.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-09-2019, 12:20 PM
 
4,452 posts, read 2,168,093 times
Reputation: 9184
You two guys need to get over your God complex and stop acting like you're doing everyone a favor. Why don't you start by answering the OP's question?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-09-2019, 01:00 PM
 
1,572 posts, read 2,107,995 times
Reputation: 2455
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYC refugee View Post
CareCredit is just a way for them to make you think you can "manage" those exorbitant charges. They still get their money up front and you get more debt.

Then how do you propose the dental office should get paid?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-09-2019, 01:18 PM
 
4,287 posts, read 3,462,845 times
Reputation: 9581
OP when was the last time you had your teeth cleaned? If it's been a while, I think I would start with a general dentist. They may be able to give you a good referral and maybe give a general opinion on what your next steps would be. It might be helpful information to have when you go to the specialist.

If you've been seeing a general dentist regularly and if you have a good referral to a specialist, then I think I'd at least try starting there.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Health and Wellness > Dental Health

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top