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Old 10-03-2019, 10:57 AM
 
Location: Canada
6,415 posts, read 5,070,624 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WoodyWW View Post
I saw the dentist, & he said I definitely need a root canal & a crown, or to have it pulled. And at first he was saying: "Do you have an extra $3K laying around? BC an extraction would cost 1/10 of that." So I asked, what would you do?

He said; "well, for people who already have some missing teeth, another tooth pulled maybe wouldn't matter. But you still have all of your original teeth, sooo".......

BTW, I'm well into my 60's. And I'm way more afraid of having a tooth yanked out, & the recovery from that, than a root canal. But that's me; for many, just paying $200 or $300 for an extraction could be the best option.
Hell no! I've had both a root canal and an extraction on the same tooth. MUCH easier both for the procedure and recovery when you get it taken out. The only thing that bothered me was the sound. You adapt to chewing on the other side if that is your favoured side to chew on.

I wouldn't wish a root canal on anyone... the most uncomfortable procedure I've had done with a dentist. Not from pain, but for your position in the chair, what they do in your mouth and the length of time it takes until they say you're all done.
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Old 10-03-2019, 03:11 PM
 
615 posts, read 602,096 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
If you're considering having the tooth extracted, consider whether it's a back tooth or a tooth near the front where it will show. It does not hurt to have a tooth pulled. I had one pulled a few years ago and it's not this big ordeal you're scared about.

Even a root canal isn't that bad, really. And if the tooth is in a place where it would show, I'd get the root canal and get it over with. If the tooth is way in the back of your mouth, just have it pulled. Don't get all worked up over nothing.
Speaking as a dentist, I do not agree with this. For too many reasons to list here, back teeth are just as important as front teeth. It's not a simple matter of "does it show or not".


Every person is different and has different expectations/desires when it comes to their health. Talk to your dentist/get a second opinion to discuss the different options and the pros/cons of each one and use that information to make the best decision for YOU.
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Old 10-04-2019, 10:21 AM
 
550 posts, read 733,601 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
If the tooth is way in the back of your mouth, just have it pulled. Don't get all worked up over nothing.
I'm sure you mean well, but I've had 2 root canals so far, a really hideous "crown reduction" once (maybe that back tooth should've just been pulled?), & my wisdom teeth out (truly hideous). None of them were "nothing".

FYI, I'm not really "all worked up". It's more just dread: This again? I just had a root canal & crown about 18 months ago. But I'm glad I paid (a ton of $$) to save the tooth. If I'd of had it pulled, & now had this one pulled, I'd have 2 missing molars. I'm 68--& I still have, so far, all my original teeth. They're like a matched set.

BTW, I called a highly rated oral surgeon near me to get an idea of what an extraction would cost. The phone person absolutely refused to give me even a range of prices. After going a few rounds with her about that, I tried to get a price for just seeing that dentist--it took some doing to get a price out of her just for an evaluation--not cheap.

The receptionist at the endodondist I may see is so nice over the phone--& answers all my questions. That endodondist has great ratings. This may all sound silly to some here, but I take dental & medical issues very seriously........
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Old 10-05-2019, 09:15 AM
 
1,685 posts, read 2,173,205 times
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I have had 3 or 4 root canals and a crown. They takes some time to complete, but they deaden the area, so there really isn't much pain. Another route to go is a bridge, or a dental implant. I have read that implants last very well with rare complications.
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Old 10-05-2019, 10:29 AM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
27,964 posts, read 18,337,026 times
Reputation: 43598
Quote:
Originally Posted by WoodyWW View Post
I saw the dentist, & he said I definitely need a root canal & a crown, or to have it pulled. And at first he was saying: "Do you have an extra $3K laying around? BC an extraction would cost 1/10 of that." So I asked, what would you do?

He said; "well, for people who already have some missing teeth, another tooth pulled maybe wouldn't matter. But you still have all of your original teeth, sooo".......

BTW, I'm well into my 60's. And I'm way more afraid of having a tooth yanked out, & the recovery from that, than a root canal. But that's me; for many, just paying $200 or $300 for an extraction could be the best option.
I’ve had both. The root canal for me was not a big deal. Having teeth pulled was more of an ordeal. When they pull your tooth, they want to put in a screw which will anchor a new tooth. I had a lot of pain with that. I’d do a root canal if I had the choice. But an endodontist will give you advice on whether the tooth can be saved.

If they do an extraction, they can sedate you. You won’t feel a thing.
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Old 10-05-2019, 11:35 AM
 
27 posts, read 11,612 times
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OP. I am in my early 60s. I had an abcess on #15 this last spring that developed into a sinus infection. A round of antibiotics with steroids, a root canal, and a porcelain crown took care of it all. I was really nervous about the root canal, but the endodontist was great (sure, it was a little uncomfortable during the procedure, but the pain was minimal; they have new drugs nowadays to numb your tooth area). My regular dentist did the crown; this procedure was not too bad either. The root canal was $1,800 and the crown was $1,200.


I thought about just getting it pulled, but my wife said I am too young to start pulling teeth. Even if you are in your late 60s, that is still kind of young. I think you should go root canal and crown. BUT, have a nice talk with your endodontist.


I had all my wisdom teeth pulled in one sitting when I was about 30. Geez, I had to take a week off from work to recover, but still, it was worth it to avoid those infections from impacted wisdom teeth that got worse and worse as I got older.
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Old 10-06-2019, 11:12 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
11,510 posts, read 8,362,611 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeBear View Post
For what it's worth, I'm age 60 and just had my FIRST regular adult tooth pulled a few months back. Beyond wisdom teeth many years ago.

This tooth after a bad abscess back in 2009, need a root canal by my dentist, the root canal re-done from the side by an Endodontist, then capped. This year, 10 years later it started hurting again just like the run-up to the original abscess. I went in to see my dentist, (same one from 2009) and he checked it, started doing another root canal through the cap, said "it doesn't seem right". He took additional x-rays, still wasn't sure, took a few of the newer MRI pics for dentists, and finally realized that it had cracked deep inside.

He then said "there's nothing else for it, but to pull it". He then did so, which went quickly. It took a while to heal since it had had an infection, but it's great now, and the gum has hardened up nicely. I have to be careful not to bite down on something hard capable of getting in there edge-wise and hurting the gum (such as tortilla chips, etc.) otherwise, no issues at all.

I recommend getting it pulled. But it's your decision. You can spend the money for root canal and cap, and it might still need pulling soon afterwards. Or maybe you'll get another 10 years out of it before it gets pulled, like me.

I had a similar experience with a molar-the last one on the bottom right. It had been mildly painful on occasion for a couple years, then (naturally) erupted in intense pain as I was on vacation visiting family. X-rays showed there was an abscess under the root, and the dentist/endodontist did a root canal. I had my regular dentist at home put a crown on the tooth, and I thought (dumbly) that I'd never have any more issues with that tooth. About five years later, I started getting small abscesses or something erupting on each side of the jaw under that tooth, turned out they were coming from another abscess under the tooth. There was no pain, but I took it to my dentist (a new dentist where we now live), who in an attempt to salvage that tooth at least temporarily, did a deep cleaning and planing under the gumline. I ended up with a few stitches in the area from that planing, but the guy gave me enough novocaine (or whatever they use) so it wasn't painful. That did help and I had no more issues with that tooth for another two years. But after that the abscesses on the jaw under that tooth came back. The x-rays on that tooth showed the root canal and part of the tooth next to it had cracked, and that allowed access to the gum/bone tissue, causing the abscesses. Again, no pain, but as I understand it having active dental abscesses is not recommended for one's general health, so I took it back to the dentist.

The dentist gave me several options, including a second root canal on that tooth, another planing, but he recommended in light of the history that he just pull it, which would make the whole issue go away, so that is what we did. He had a bit of a challenge getting that molar out, and with the infection there the extraction was somewhat painful, but he gave me lots of novocaine and he was gentle, so it wasn't as bad as it could have been.

And that has taken care of those root canal, abscess issues, as there is no tooth left. The gum has healed nicely, though there is a big indented gap where the tooth had been. I wonder if the indentation is due to tissue and bone loss over time with those abscesses when the tooth was there. But whatever, it's ok now.

I never had an implant, or bridge, or anything that replaced that tooth. The dentist never mentioned anything like that to me after he pulled the tooth, and I believe that's due to its position, being the last molar. I know he would have recommended something to fill in that spot had it been in a more forward position and might have affected the other teeth.
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Old 10-07-2019, 11:48 AM
 
615 posts, read 602,096 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Travelassie View Post
I had a similar experience with a molar-the last one on the bottom right. It had been mildly painful on occasion for a couple years, then (naturally) erupted in intense pain as I was on vacation visiting family. X-rays showed there was an abscess under the root, and the dentist/endodontist did a root canal. I had my regular dentist at home put a crown on the tooth, and I thought (dumbly) that I'd never have any more issues with that tooth. About five years later, I started getting small abscesses or something erupting on each side of the jaw under that tooth, turned out they were coming from another abscess under the tooth. There was no pain, but I took it to my dentist (a new dentist where we now live), who in an attempt to salvage that tooth at least temporarily, did a deep cleaning and planing under the gumline. I ended up with a few stitches in the area from that planing, but the guy gave me enough novocaine (or whatever they use) so it wasn't painful. That did help and I had no more issues with that tooth for another two years. But after that the abscesses on the jaw under that tooth came back. The x-rays on that tooth showed the root canal and part of the tooth next to it had cracked, and that allowed access to the gum/bone tissue, causing the abscesses. Again, no pain, but as I understand it having active dental abscesses is not recommended for one's general health, so I took it back to the dentist.

The dentist gave me several options, including a second root canal on that tooth, another planing, but he recommended in light of the history that he just pull it, which would make the whole issue go away, so that is what we did. He had a bit of a challenge getting that molar out, and with the infection there the extraction was somewhat painful, but he gave me lots of novocaine and he was gentle, so it wasn't as bad as it could have been.

And that has taken care of those root canal, abscess issues, as there is no tooth left. The gum has healed nicely, though there is a big indented gap where the tooth had been. I wonder if the indentation is due to tissue and bone loss over time with those abscesses when the tooth was there. But whatever, it's ok now.

I never had an implant, or bridge, or anything that replaced that tooth. The dentist never mentioned anything like that to me after he pulled the tooth, and I believe that's due to its position, being the last molar. I know he would have recommended something to fill in that spot had it been in a more forward position and might have affected the other teeth.
Seems odd that the dentist felt the tooth was important enough to give you multiple options to save the tooth, but then when the tooth is gone, it's not important enough to replace?


Not saying that your dentist did this, but I have seen dozens of cases where a patient wasn't presented a treatment option simply because the dentist did not provide that type of treatment. In your case, you had a last molar that needed to be removed. The only replacement would have been a dental implant. If your dentist does not do dental implants, they may just tell you that you don't need the tooth. Again, not saying this is what happened to you specifically, but it is something I see a lot.


Typical scenario: Patient had a tooth extracted on one side and a bridge done about a year ago. They see me about a tooth that needs to be extracted on the other side. I tell them about implants vs bridges. They love the implant idea and it fits in their budget. Next question is always "Why didn't they tell me I could get an implant for THIS tooth?" and they point to their bridge. The short answer is that the dentist probably didn't do implants and therefore steered the patient toward something they knew they could make money on. Never made any sense to me - I don't do root canals, but if I see that a patient needs one, I send them to someone who will do it.
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Old 10-12-2019, 08:58 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
11,510 posts, read 8,362,611 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bart0323 View Post
Seems odd that the dentist felt the tooth was important enough to give you multiple options to save the tooth, but then when the tooth is gone, it's not important enough to replace?


Not saying that your dentist did this, but I have seen dozens of cases where a patient wasn't presented a treatment option simply because the dentist did not provide that type of treatment. In your case, you had a last molar that needed to be removed. The only replacement would have been a dental implant. If your dentist does not do dental implants, they may just tell you that you don't need the tooth. Again, not saying this is what happened to you specifically, but it is something I see a lot.


Typical scenario: Patient had a tooth extracted on one side and a bridge done about a year ago. They see me about a tooth that needs to be extracted on the other side. I tell them about implants vs bridges. They love the implant idea and it fits in their budget. Next question is always "Why didn't they tell me I could get an implant for THIS tooth?" and they point to their bridge. The short answer is that the dentist probably didn't do implants and therefore steered the patient toward something they knew they could make money on. Never made any sense to me - I don't do root canals, but if I see that a patient needs one, I send them to someone who will do it.
This dentist does do implants, I believe it was the position of the tooth ( #17) that made him think a replacement implant might not have been needed. He did an extraction of a more forward molar ( can't remember which one, perhaps #
18, 19, 30 or 31) on my husband, and informed him that he needed either an implant or bridge to fill in the space. He would have done either but left the choice up to my husband. I think there was some other work he did near that tooth that made a bridge one of the options, but I don't know the details. My husband went with the bridge and has been happy with that.

We also have a friend who was referred to this dentist for implants by an oral surgeon who had done multiple extractions and other work on him. Our dentist did multiple implants on our friend, they look great and our friend was very happy with the results. The population in our area has a high concentration of seniors, so I know there are no shortages of opportunities for this dentist to recommend and perform implants, and from what I have seen, or overheard, this dentist does his share of implants, and isn't reluctant to recommend them when he thinks they are indicated. And he's busy.

So I've got a space where #17 molar used to be, but far as I can tell I haven't had any other issues related to that. His office tells me this dentist will do root canals but tends to refer those on the back molars to an endodontist.

Perhaps most dentists consider their own pocketbooks first when they make recommendations, but for sure this guy is not of them. I've seen this guy reduce or do gratis for some part of his work ( ex., for an incidental x-ray he needed on a tooth he was working on) for patients having extensive dental work, and I know his office offers payment of services over time. I managed to crack the porcelain overlay on a couple crowns ( I'm afraid I've got a super gorilla bite) eating a Heath bar one time, these later broke. This dentist had put in those crowns, he replaced them with " Brux-Zirs", and since at least one of the originals had been put in less than five years before he offered me a substantial discount for the work. I didn't ask for this, nor did I expect it as figured it was my fault those crowns had cracked and broke. For the first crown replacement, he charged only what they paid for the materials ( think it was about $227), and the second one done at a later time about $ 800.

And I've been happy with those new crowns ever since.
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Old 10-12-2019, 09:13 AM
 
Location: Prepperland
15,116 posts, read 10,945,592 times
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Pain: remedy, thin slice of raw garlic. This worked surprisingly well - enough to be able to get some sleep. I had a cracked filling that was stimulating an infection up in the jawbone. Both resolved after tooth was pulled.
Loose molar: extracted. Healed up in short order.
Your dentist will remind you of the dangers of a 'dry socket' - where the scab falls off before its properly healed.

Meal suggestions: make a meat smoothie. Sounds gawful, but it is basically a soup or stew that is blended. No strain on the teeth. The only caveat is volume. If you're not sure, spoon it out in your favorite serving bowl to get the right amount - then blend it. It may whip up or not, so the blender's volume measurements may not reflect the desired serving size.
You can also make a "Frankenstein stew" from leftovers, a bit of meat or fish, and some stock (chicken or beef).
Trick: pour out the smoothie into a tall glass. If you leave it in the blender, chunks may get caught in the blade, as it sits.

Quick Spice Zingers:
_ _ Tabasco _ _ MSG _ _ Old Bay seasoning _ _ raw garlic _ _ salsa _ _ raw vegetables (celery, sprouts)

DANGER: Do not try to blend leaf lettuce. . . blech.
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